rigid

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See also: rígid

English[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Middle English rigide, from Latin rigidus (stiff), from rigeō (I am stiff). Compare rigor. Merged with Middle English rigged, rygged, rugged (upright like a spine, rigid, literally ridged), from ridge +‎ -ed.

Pronunciation[edit]

Adjective[edit]

rigid (comparative rigider or more rigid, superlative rigidest or most rigid)

  1. Stiff, rather than flexible.
  2. Fixed, rather than moving.
    • 2011,David Foster Wallace, The Pale King,Penguin Books, page 5:
      A sunflower, four more, one bowed, and horses in the distance standing rigid and still as toys.
  3. Rigorous and unbending.
  4. Uncompromising.

Synonyms[edit]

Antonyms[edit]

Derived terms[edit]

Related terms[edit]

Translations[edit]

The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables, removing any numbers. Numbers do not necessarily match those in definitions. See instructions at Wiktionary:Entry layout#Translations.

Noun[edit]

rigid (plural rigids)

  1. A bicycle with no suspension system.

References[edit]


Old Irish[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Celtic *rigeti (bind), from Proto-Indo-European *reyǵ- (to bind, reach).

Verb[edit]

rigid

  1. to stretch, to distend

Inflection[edit]

Derived terms[edit]

References[edit]

  • rigid” in Dictionary of the Irish Language, Royal Irish Academy, 1913–76.