gas

Definition from Wiktionary, the free dictionary
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See also: Gas, gás, gaś, gãs, gås, gą̊s, gæs, gæs', gås', and Gaś

English[edit]

English Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia

Pronunciation[edit]

  • enPR: găs, IPA(key): /ɡæs/
  • (file)
  • Rhymes: -æs

Etymology 1[edit]

Borrowed from Dutch gas [1650s], coined by chemist Jan Baptist van Helmont. Derived from Dutch chaos (chaos), from Ancient Greek χάος (kháos, chasm, void, empty space); perhaps inspired by geest (breath, vapour, spirit).

Noun[edit]

gas (countable and uncountable, plural gases or gasses)

  1. (uncountable, chemistry) Matter in an intermediate state between liquid and plasma that can be contained only if it is fully surrounded by a solid (or in a bubble of liquid, or held together by gravitational pull); it can condense into a liquid, or can (rarely) become a solid directly by deposition.
    • 2013 July–August, Lee S. Langston, “The Adaptable Gas Turbine”, in American Scientist[1]:
      Turbines have been around for a long time—windmills and water wheels are early examples. The name comes from the Latin turbo, meaning vortex, and thus the defining property of a turbine is that a fluid or gas turns the blades of a rotor, which is attached to a shaft that can perform useful work.
    A lot of gas had escaped from the cylinder.
    Synonyms: vapor, vapour
    1. (uncountable) A flammable gaseous hydrocarbon or hydrocarbon mixture used as a fuel, e.g. for cooking, heating, electricity generation or as a fuel in internal combustion engines in vehicles, especially natural gas.
      Gas-fired power stations have largely replaced coal-burning ones.
    2. (uncountable, military) Poison gas.
      The artillery fired gas shells into the enemy trenches.
  2. (countable, chemistry) A chemical element or compound in such a state.
    The atmosphere is made up of a number of different gases.
  3. (countable) A hob on a gas cooker.
    She turned the gas on, put the potatoes on, then lit the oven.
  4. (uncountable) Methane or other waste gases trapped in one's belly as a result of the digestive process; flatus.
    Synonym: wind
    My tummy hurts so bad – I have gas.
    • 2008, Nicholas Drayson, A Guide to the Birds of East Africa, page 72:
      But anyone with that many large brown birds aroost in his cranium and that much gas in his bottom was clearly not a well person.
  5. (Hiberno-English slang) A humorous or entertaining event or person.
    • 1963 May, Gloria Steinem, “A Bunny's Tale”, in Show Magazine[2], archived from the original on 2017-10-04:
      Two more girls came in, one in bright pink stretch pants and the other in purple. “Man this place is a gas,” said pink.
    • 1971, Marc Bolan (lyrics and music), “Life's a Gas”, in Electric Warrior, performed by T. Rex:
      No it really doesn't matter at all / Life's a gas / I hope it's going to last
    • 1978, “Heart of Glass”, in Parallel Lines, performed by Blondie:
      Once I had a love and it was a gas / Soon turned out had a heart of glass
    • 1979, “Belsen Was a Gas”, in The Great Rock ‘n’ Roll Swindle, performed by Sex Pistols:
      Be a man, Be a man / Belsen was a gas / Be a man, kill someone
  6. (slang) Frothy talk; chatter.
  7. (baseball) A fastball.
    The closer threw him nothing but gas.
  8. (medicine, colloquial) Arterial or venous blood gas.
  9. (slang, uncountable) Marijuana, typically of high quality.
Derived terms[edit]
Translations[edit]
See also[edit]

Verb[edit]

gas (third-person singular simple present gases or gasses, present participle gassing, simple past and past participle gassed)

  1. (transitive) To attack or kill with poison gas.
    The Nazis gassed millions of Jews during the Holocaust.
    He never fully recovered after he was gassed on the Western Front.
  2. (intransitive, slang) To talk in a boastful or vapid way; chatter.
    • 1899, Stephen Crane, chapter 1, in Twelve O'Clock:
      [] (it was the town's humour to be always gassing of phantom investors who were likely to come any moment and pay a thousand prices for everything) — “ [] Them rich fellers, they don't make no bad breaks with their money. []
    • 1955, C. S. Lewis, The Magician's Nephew, Collins, 1998, Chapter 3,
      "Well don't keep on gassing about it," said Digory.
  3. (transitive, slang) To impose upon by talking boastfully.
  4. (intransitive) To emit gas.
    The battery cell was gassing.
  5. (transitive) To impregnate with gas.
    to gas lime with chlorine in the manufacture of bleaching powder
  6. (transitive) To singe, as in a gas flame, so as to remove loose fibers.
    to gas thread
Translations[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

Clipping of gasoline.

Noun[edit]

gas (countable and uncountable, plural gases or gasses)

  1. (uncountable, Canada, US) Gasoline; a derivative of petroleum used as fuel.
    Synonyms: (US) gasoline, (British) petrol; see also Thesaurus:petroleum
  2. (uncountable, cryptocurrencies) An internal virtual currency used in Ethereum to pay for certain operations, such as blockchain transactions.
    Coordinate term: Ether
    • 2018, Andreas M. Antonopoulos; Gavin Wood, Mastering Ethereum: Building Smart Contracts and DApps[3], O'Reilly Media, →ISBN:
      Gas is the fuel of Ethereum. Gas is not ether–it's a separate virtual currency with its own exchange rate against ether. Ethereum uses gas to control the amount of resources that transactions can use []
    • 2021 November 6, Ben Butler, “Australian banks are opening up to cryptocurrency: what does it mean for you?”, in The Guardian[4]:
      The average “gas fee” – transaction cost – of an Ethereum transaction is between US$85 and US $156, according to crypto.com data.
Derived terms[edit]
Terms derived from gas (gasoline)
Translations[edit]

Verb[edit]

gas (third-person singular simple present gases or gasses, present participle gassing, simple past and past participle gassed)

  1. (US) To give a vehicle more fuel in order to accelerate it.
    The cops are coming. Gas it!
    Synonyms: hit the gas, step on the gas
  2. (US) To fill (a vehicle's fuel tank) with fuel.
    Synonym: refuel
Derived terms[edit]
Translations[edit]

Etymology 3[edit]

Compare the slang usage of "a gas", above.

Adjective[edit]

gas (comparative gasser, superlative gassest)

  1. (Ireland, colloquial) Comical, zany; fun, amusing.
    • 2016, Liz Nugent, Lying In Wait, →ISBN, page 113:
      The other models were gas fun, though they were all a bit hoity-toity.
    Mary's new boyfriend is a gas man.
    It was gas when the bird flew into the classroom.

Anagrams[edit]


Afrikaans[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Dutch gast.

Noun[edit]

gas (plural gaste)

  1. guest

Etymology 2[edit]

From Dutch gas.

Noun[edit]

gas (plural gasse)

  1. gas (substance in gaseous phase)

Basque[edit]

Basque Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia eu

Noun[edit]

gas inan

  1. gas

Declension[edit]

Declension of gas (inanimate, ending in consonant)
indefinite singular plural
absolutive gas gasa gasak
ergative gasek gasak gasek
dative gasi gasari gasei
genitive gasen gasaren gasen
comitative gasekin gasarekin gasekin
causative gasengatik gasarengatik gasengatik
benefactive gasentzat gasarentzat gasentzat
instrumental gasez gasaz gasez
insessive gasetan gasean gasetan
locative gasetako gaseko gasetako
allative gasetara gasera gasetara
terminative gasetaraino gaseraino gasetaraino
directive gasetarantz gaserantz gasetarantz
destinative gasetarako gaserako gasetarako
ablative gasetatik gasetik gasetatik
partitive gasik
prolative gastzat

Derived terms[edit]


Catalan[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

gas m (plural gasos)

  1. gas

Derived terms[edit]

Related terms[edit]

Further reading[edit]


Dutch[edit]

Dutch Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia nl

Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

Coined by chemist Van Helmont. Perhaps inspired by geest (breath, vapour, spirit) or by chaos (chaos), from Ancient Greek χάος (kháos, chasm, void).

Noun[edit]

gas n (plural gassen, diminutive gasje n)

  1. gas
  2. liquefied petroleum gas
    Synonyms: autogas, LPG
Derived terms[edit]
Descendants[edit]
  • Afrikaans: gas
  • English: gas
  • French: gaz
  • German: Gas
  • West Frisian: gas

Etymology 2[edit]

From Middle Dutch gasse (unpaved street), from Middle High German gazze, from Old High German gazza, from Proto-Germanic *gatwǭ.

Noun[edit]

gas f (plural gassen, diminutive gasje n)

  1. unpaved street

Etymology 3[edit]

See the etymology of the corresponding lemma form.

Verb[edit]

gas

  1. first-person singular present indicative of gassen
  2. imperative of gassen

Galician[edit]

Noun[edit]

gas m (plural gases)

  1. gas
    Synonym: vapor

Derived terms[edit]

Related terms[edit]


Icelandic[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

Borrowed from Dutch gas.

Noun[edit]

gas n (genitive singular gass, nominative plural gös)

  1. gas (state of matter)
Declension[edit]
Derived terms[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

Borrowed from French gaze.

Noun[edit]

gas n (genitive singular gass, no plural)

  1. gauze
Declension[edit]
Derived terms[edit]

Anagrams[edit]


Indonesian[edit]

Indonesian Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia id

Etymology[edit]

From Dutch gas (gas), a term coined by chemist Jan Baptist van Helmont. Perhaps inspired by geest (breath, vapour, spirit) or by chaos (chaos), from Ancient Greek χάος (kháos, chasm, void).

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): [ˈɡas]
  • Hyphenation: gas

Noun[edit]

gas (plural gas-gas, first-person possessive gasku, second-person possessive gasmu, third-person possessive gasnya)

  1. gas,
    1. (chemistry, physics) Matter in a state intermediate between liquid and plasma that can be contained only if it is fully surrounded by a solid (or in a bubble of liquid) (or held together by gravitational pull); it can condense into a liquid, or can (rarely) become a solid directly.
    2. A flammable gaseous hydrocarbon or hydrocarbon mixture (typically predominantly methane) used as a fuel, e.g. for cooking, heating, electricity generation or as a fuel in internal combustion engines in vehicles.

Derived terms[edit]

Compounds[edit]

Verb[edit]

gas

  1. (colloquial) to hit the gas, to accelerate.
    Synonym: mengegas

Further reading[edit]


Interlingua[edit]

Noun[edit]

gas (plural gases)

  1. gas

Irish[edit]

Etymology[edit]

(This etymology is missing or incomplete. Please add to it, or discuss it at the Etymology scriptorium.)

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

gas m (genitive singular gais, nominative plural gais or gasa)

  1. stalk, stem
  2. sprig, shoot, frond
  3. (figuratively) stripling; scion

Declension[edit]

Derived terms[edit]

Mutation[edit]

Irish mutation
Radical Lenition Eclipsis
gas ghas ngas
Note: Some of these forms may be hypothetical. Not every possible mutated form of every word actually occurs.

Further reading[edit]

  • "gas" in Foclóir Gaeilge–Béarla, An Gúm, 1977, by Niall Ó Dónaill.
  • Entries containing “gas” in English-Irish Dictionary, An Gúm, 1959, by Tomás de Bhaldraithe.
  • Entries containing “gas” in New English-Irish Dictionary by Foras na Gaeilge.

Italian[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /ˈɡas/
  • Rhymes: -as
  • Hyphenation: gàs

Noun[edit]

gas m (uncountable)

  1. gas (state of matter, petroleum)
  2. carbon dioxide (in fizzy drinks)
  3. petrol
    Synonym: benzina
  4. poison gas

Related terms[edit]

Further reading[edit]

  • gas in Treccani.it – Vocabolario Treccani on line, Istituto dell'Enciclopedia Italiana

Latin[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Coined by chemist Jan Baptist van Helmont (appearing in his Ortus Medicinae as an invariable noun).

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

Latin Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia la

gas n (genitive gasis); third declension

  1. (physics) gas (state of matter)
    Synonyms: gasum, gasium

Declension[edit]

Third-declension noun (neuter, imparisyllabic non-i-stem).

Case Singular Plural
Nominative gas gasa
Genitive gasis gasum
Dative gasī gasibus
Accusative gas gasa
Ablative gase gasibus
Vocative gas gasa

Norman[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old French gars, nominative singular form of garçon.

Noun[edit]

gas m (plural gas)

  1. (Jersey) chap

Norwegian Bokmål[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From French gaze

Noun[edit]

gas m (definite singular gasen, indefinite plural gaser, definite plural gasene)

  1. gauze

See also[edit]

References[edit]


Norwegian Nynorsk[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From French gaze

Noun[edit]

gas m (definite singular gasen, indefinite plural gasar, definite plural gasane)

  1. gauze

See also[edit]

References[edit]


Old Saxon[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Germanic *gans, from Proto-Indo-European *ǵʰh₂éns.

Noun[edit]

gās f

  1. a goose

Declension[edit]


Descendants[edit]


Old Swedish[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old Norse gás, from Proto-Germanic *gans.

Noun[edit]

gās f

  1. goose

Declension[edit]

Descendants[edit]


Rohingya[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Sanskrit.

Noun[edit]

gas

  1. tree

Romagnol[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Dutch gas (gas), invented by Jan Baptiste van Helmont, from Latin chaos (chaos).

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

gas m (plural ghës)

  1. gas

Serbo-Croatian[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

gȃs m (Cyrillic spelling га̑с)

  1. (chiefly Bosnia, Serbia or colloquial) gas (state of matter)
    Synonym: (Croatian) plȋn
  2. gas (as fuel for combustion engines)
  3. (figuratively) acceleration
    • dȁti gȃs - “give gas”: accelerate
  4. gas pedal, accelerator

Declension[edit]


Spanish[edit]

Spanish Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia es

Etymology[edit]

Borrowed from Dutch gas, coined by Belgian chemist Jan Baptist van Helmont. Perhaps inspired by Middle Dutch gheest (Modern Dutch geest (breath, vapour, spirit), or from Ancient Greek χάος (kháos, chasm, void).

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /ˈɡas/, [ˈɡas]
  • (file)

Noun[edit]

gas m (plural gases)

  1. gas (matter between liquid and plasma)
  2. gas (an element or compound in such a state)
  3. gas (flammable gas used for combustion)
  4. (in the plural) gas (waste gases trapped in one's belly)

Derived terms[edit]

Related terms[edit]

Further reading[edit]

Anagrams[edit]


Swedish[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

gas c

  1. gas; a state of matter
  2. gas; a compound or element in such a state
  3. gas; gaseous fuels
  4. (plural only: gaser) gas; waste gas

Declension[edit]

Declension of gas 
Singular Plural
Indefinite Definite Indefinite Definite
Nominative gas gasen gaser gaserna
Genitive gas gasens gasers gasernas

Derived terms[edit]

Anagrams[edit]


Tagalog[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Either from Spanish gas or English gas, ultimately from Dutch gas.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

gas

  1. gasoline
    Synonym: gasolina
  2. kerosene; petroleum; gas
    Synonym: petrolyo
  3. gaseous substance; vapor; fume
    Synonyms: singaw, asngaw

Derived terms[edit]


Welsh[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Verb[edit]

gas

  1. Soft mutation of cas.

Mutation[edit]

Welsh mutation
radical soft nasal aspirate
cas gas nghas chas
Note: Some of these forms may be hypothetical. Not every
possible mutated form of every word actually occurs.

West Frisian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Borrowed from Dutch gas.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

gas n (plural gassen)

  1. gas

Further reading[edit]

  • gas”, in Wurdboek fan de Fryske taal (in Dutch), 2011

Westrobothnian[edit]

Pronunciation 1[edit]

Noun[edit]

gas n

  1. Romping, cry (of joy.)
Related terms[edit]

Pronunciation 2[edit]

  • IPA(key): /ɡoːs/, /ɡɒːs/, /ɡɑːs/

Noun[edit]

gas f

  1. Goose.
  2. A round piece of butter with a depression created with the thumb.
  3. = klening m
Derived terms[edit]