gas

Definition from Wiktionary, the free dictionary
Jump to: navigation, search
See also: Gas, gás, gås, gås', gãs, gaś, gą̊s, gæs, and gæs'

Contents

English[edit]

Wikipedia has an article on:

Wikipedia

Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Dutch gas, a word coined by chemist Van Helmont. From Ancient Greek χάος ‎(kháos, chasm, void).

Noun[edit]

gas ‎(countable and uncountable, plural gases or gasses)

  1. (uncountable, chemistry) Matter in a state intermediate between liquid and plasma that can be contained only if it is fully surrounded by a solid (or in a bubble of liquid) (or held together by gravitational pull); it can condense into a liquid, or can (rarely) become a solid directly.
    • 2013 July-August, Lee S. Langston, “The Adaptable Gas Turbine”, American Scientist: 
      Turbines have been around for a long time—windmills and water wheels are early examples. The name comes from the Latin turbo, meaning vortex, and thus the defining property of a turbine is that a fluid or gas turns the blades of a rotor, which is attached to a shaft that can perform useful work.
    A lot of gas had escaped from the cylinder.
  2. (countable, chemistry) A chemical element or compound in such a state.
    The atmosphere is made up of a number of different gases.
  3. (uncountable) A flammable gaseous hydrocarbon or hydrocarbon mixture (typically predominantly methane) used as a fuel, e.g. for cooking, heating, electricity generation or as a fuel in internal combustion engines in vehicles.
    Gas-fired power stations have largely replaced coal-burning ones.
  4. (countable) A hob on a gas cooker.
    She turned the gas on, put the potatoes on, then lit the oven.
  5. (US) Methane or other waste gases trapped in one's belly as a result of the digestive process.
    My tummy hurts so bad, I have gas.
  6. (slang) A humorous or entertaining event or person.
    He is such a gas!
  7. (baseball) A fastball.
    The closer threw him nothing but gas.
Synonyms[edit]
  • (state of matter): vapor / vapour
  • (digestive process): wind, fart (when gas is released) (US, slang)
Derived terms[edit]
Translations[edit]
See also[edit]

Verb[edit]

gas ‎(third-person singular simple present gases, present participle gassing, simple past and past participle gassed)

  1. (transitive) To kill with poisonous gas.
  2. (intransitive) To talk, chat.
    • 1899, Stephen Crane, chapter 1, Twelve O'Clock:
      […] (it was the town's humour to be always gassing of phantom investors who were likely to come any moment and pay a thousand prices for everything) — “[…] Them rich fellers, they don't make no bad breaks with their money. […]”
  3. (intransitive) To emit gas.
    The battery cell was gassing.
  4. (transitive) To impregnate with gas.
    to gas lime with chlorine in the manufacture of bleaching powder
  5. (transitive) To singe, as in a gas flame, so as to remove loose fibers.
    to gas thread
Translations[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

Shortening of gasoline.

Noun[edit]

gas ‎(uncountable)

  1. (uncountable, US) Gasoline; a derivative of petroleum used as fuel.
  2. (US) Gas pedal.
Synonyms[edit]
Derived terms[edit]
Translations[edit]

Verb[edit]

gas ‎(third-person singular simple present gases or gasses, present participle gassing, simple past and past participle gassed)

  1. (US) To give a vehicle more fuel in order to accelerate it.
    The cops are coming. Gas it!
  2. (US) To fill (a vehicle's fuel tank) with fuel.
Synonyms[edit]
Derived terms[edit]
Translations[edit]

Etymology 3[edit]

Compare the slang usage of "a gas", above.

Adjective[edit]

gas ‎(not comparable)

  1. (Ireland, colloquial) comical, zany.
    Mary's new boyfriend is a gas man.
    It was gas when the bird flew into the classroom.
Usage notes[edit]
  • This is common in speech, but rarely used in writing.

Anagrams[edit]


Basque[edit]

Basque Wikipedia has an article on:

Wikipedia eu

Noun[edit]

gas

  1. gas

Declension[edit]

Derived terms[edit]


Dutch[edit]

Dutch Wikipedia has an article on:

Wikipedia nl

Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

Coined by chemist Van Helmont. Perhaps inspired by geest ‎(breath, vapour, spirit) or by chaos ‎(chaos), from Ancient Greek χάος ‎(kháos, chasm, void).

Noun[edit]

gas n ‎(plural gassen, diminutive gasje n)

  1. gas
  2. (automotive) liquefied petroleum gas
Synonyms[edit]
Derived terms[edit]

Verb[edit]

gas

  1. first-person singular present indicative of gassen
  2. imperative of gassen

Etymology 2[edit]

From Middle Dutch gasse ‎(unpaved street), from Middle High German gazze, from Old High German gazza, from Proto-Germanic *gatwǭ. Cognate with English gate and German Gasse ‎(unpaved street). Related to Dutch gat ‎(hole).

Noun[edit]

gas f ‎(plural gassen, diminutive gasje n)

  1. unpaved street

Galician[edit]

Noun[edit]

gas m ‎(plural gases)

  1. gas

Synonyms[edit]

Derived terms[edit]

Related terms[edit]


Icelandic[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Dutch gas.

Noun[edit]

gas n ‎(genitive singular gass, nominative plural gös)

  1. gas (state of matter)
Declension[edit]
Derived terms[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

From French gaze

Noun[edit]

gas n ‎(genitive singular gass, no plural)

  1. gauze
Declension[edit]
Derived terms[edit]

Anagrams[edit]


Indonesian[edit]

Noun[edit]

gas

  1. gas

Interlingua[edit]

Noun[edit]

gas

  1. gas

Irish[edit]

Etymology[edit]

EB1911 - Volume 01 - Page 001 - 1.svg This entry lacks etymological information. If you are familiar with the origin of this term, please add it to the page as described here.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

gas m ‎(genitive singular gais, nominative plural gais)

  1. stalk, stem
  2. sprig, shoot, frond
  3. (figuratively) stripling; scion

Declension[edit]

Derived terms[edit]

Mutation[edit]

Irish mutation
Radical Lenition Eclipsis
gas ghas ngas
Note: Some of these forms may be hypothetical. Not every
possible mutated form of every word actually occurs.

Italian[edit]

Noun[edit]

gas m

  1. gas (state of matter, petroleum)
  2. petrol
  3. poison gas

Synonyms[edit]

Related terms[edit]


Latin[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

Latin Wikipedia has an article on:

Wikipedia la

gas n ‎(genitive gasis); third declension

  1. (physics) gas (state of matter)

Inflection[edit]

Third declension.

Number Singular Plural
nominative gas gasēs
genitive gasis gasum
dative gasī gasibus
accusative gasem gasēs
ablative gase gasibus
vocative gas gasēs

Lojban[edit]

Rafsi[edit]

gas

  1. rafsi of ganse.

Norman[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old French gars, nominative singular form of garçon.

Noun[edit]

gas m (plural gas)

  1. (Jersey) chap

Old Saxon[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Germanic *gans, whence also Old English gōs, Old Frisian gōs, Old High German gans, Old Norse gás. Ultimately from Proto-Indo-European *ǵʰans-.

Noun[edit]

gās f

  1. a goose

Declension[edit]

Descendants[edit]


Rohingya[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Bengali.

Noun[edit]

gas

  1. tree

Serbo-Croatian[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

gȃs m (Cyrillic spelling га̑с)

  1. (chiefly Bosnia, Serbia or colloquial) gas (state of matter)
  2. gas (as fuel for combustion engines)
  3. (figuratively) acceleration
    • dȁti gȃs - “give gas”: accelerate
  4. gas pedal, accelerator

Declension[edit]

Synonyms[edit]

  • (gaseous state of matter): plȋn (Croatian)

Spanish[edit]

Spanish Wikipedia has an article on:

Wikipedia es

Etymology[edit]

From Dutch gas, coined by Belgian chemist Jan Baptist van Helmont. Perhaps inspired by Middle Dutch gheest (Modern Dutch geest) "breath, vapour, spirit", or from Ancient Greek χάος ‎(kháos, chasm, void).

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

gas m ‎(plural gases)

  1. gas

Derived terms[edit]

Anagrams[edit]


Swedish[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

gas c

  1. gas; a state of matter
  2. gas; a compound or element in such a state
  3. gas; gaseous fuels
  4. (plural only: gaser) gas; waste gas

Declension[edit]

Derived terms[edit]


Welsh[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Verb[edit]

gas

  1. Soft mutation of cas.

West Frisian[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

gas n

  1. gas