gos

Definition from Wiktionary, the free dictionary
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See also: GOS, GoS, , gös, goç, goş, and Goś

Catalan[edit]

A dog (a Labrador)

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Onomatopoeic word used to call dogs.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

gos m (plural gossos, feminine gossa)

  1. dog

Synonyms[edit]

Further reading[edit]


Icelandic[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

gos n (genitive singular goss, nominative plural gos)

  1. (geology) eruption (of a geyser, volcano, etc.)
  2. soda (US), fizzy pop (UK)

Declension[edit]

Synonyms[edit]

Derived terms[edit]

Anagrams[edit]


Irish[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /ɡɔsˠ/, /ɡəsˠ/

Preposition[edit]

gos (plus dative, triggers no mutation)

  1. (archaic, otherwise rare) Alternative form of go (until, up to) (used before the definite article)
    gos an lá inniuup to today, until the present day

Usage notes[edit]

The preposition go (until) is very rarely used before the definite article except in a few fixed phrases like gos an lá inniu. Otherwise, the synonym go dtí is usually used before the article.


Middle English[edit]

Noun[edit]

gos

  1. Alternative form of goos

Northern Sami[edit]

Etymology[edit]

(This etymology is missing or incomplete. Please add to it, or discuss it at the Etymology scriptorium.)

Pronunciation[edit]

  • (Kautokeino) IPA(key): /ˈkos/

Adverb[edit]

gos

  1. where, in what place (interrogative)
  2. whence, from where (interrogative)
  3. where (relative)
  4. whence, from where (relative)

Further reading[edit]

  • Koponen, Eino; Ruppel, Klaas; Aapala, Kirsti, editors (2002-2008) Álgu database: Etymological database of the Saami languages[1], Helsinki: Research Institute for the Languages of Finland
  • Koponen, Eino; Ruppel, Klaas; Aapala, Kirsti, editors (2002-2008) Álgu database: Etymological database of the Saami languages[2], Helsinki: Research Institute for the Languages of Finland

Occitan[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

gos m (plural gosses)

  1. dog

Old English[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Anglo-Frisian *gą̄s [ɣɑ̃ːs], from West Germanic *gans [ɣɑns], from Proto-Germanic *gans, from Proto-Indo-European *ǵʰans-.

Germanic cognates include Old Frisian gōs (West Frisian goes), Old Saxon gās (Low German Goos), Old Dutch gans (Dutch gans), Old High German gans (German Gans), Old Norse gás (Swedish gås), and Gothic *𐌲𐌰𐌽𐍃 (*gans).

Indo-European cognates include Avestan 𐬰𐬁(), Ancient Greek χήν (khḗn), Latin ānser, Old Church Slavonic гѫсь (gǫsĭ), Lithuanian zùoss, and Old Irish géis (swan).

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /ɡoːs/, [ɣoːs] (early Old English)
  • IPA(key): /ɡoːs/, [ɡoːs] (late Old English)

Noun[edit]

gōs f

  1. goose
    • Exeter Book:
      Hwīlum iċ grǣde swā gōs.
      Sometimes I cry like a goose.

Declension[edit]

Descendants[edit]

  • Middle English: goos, gosse, goce, gos, gose
    • English: goose
    • Scots: guse

Old Saxon[edit]

Noun[edit]

gos n

  1. Alternative form of gās

Slovene[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Slavic *gǫsь, from Proto-Indo-European *ǵʰans-.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

gọ̑s f

  1. goose

Inflection[edit]

Feminine, i-stem, mobile accent
nom. sing. gós
gen. sing. gosí
singular dual plural
nominative gós gosí gosí
accusative gós gosí gosí
genitive gosí gosí gosí
dative gósi goséma gosém
locative gósi goséh goséh
instrumental gosjó goséma gosmí

Swedish[edit]

Noun[edit]

gos n (informal)

  1. cuddliness
  2. (action of) cuddling, snuggling

Declension[edit]

Declension of gos 
Uncountable
Indefinite Definite
Nominative gos goset
Genitive gos gosets

Zazaki[edit]

Noun[edit]

gos ?

  1. ear