pop

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See also: Pop, PoP, POP, pöp, and pop.

English[edit]

English Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia

Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Middle English pop, poppe (a blow; strike; buffet) (> Middle English poppen (to strike; thrust, verb)), of onomatopoeic origin – used to describe the sound, or short, sharp actions. The physics sense is part of a facetious sequence "snap, crackle, pop", after the mascots of Rice Krispies cereal.

Noun[edit]

pop (countable and uncountable, plural pops)

  1. (countable) A loud, sharp sound, as of a cork coming out of a bottle.
    Listen to the pop of a champagne cork.
  2. (uncountable, regional, Midwestern US, Canada, Inland North, Midlands, Northwestern US, Western Pennsylvania, Northern England) An effervescent or fizzy drink, most frequently nonalcoholic; soda pop.
    Lunch was sandwiches and a bottle of pop.
    • 1941 September 8, LIFE, page 27:
      The best thing on the table was a tray full of bottles of lemon pop.
  3. (countable, regional, Midwestern US, Inland North, Northwestern US, Canada, Western Pennsylvania) A bottle, can, or serving of effervescent or fizzy drink, most frequently nonalcoholic; a soda pop.
    Go in the store and buy us three pops.
  4. A pop shot: a quick, possibly unaimed, shot with a firearm.
    The man with the gun took a pop at the rabbit.
  5. (colloquial, in the phrase "a pop") A quantity dispensed; a portion; apiece.
    They cost 50 pence a pop.
    • 2008 January–February, Matt Bean, “Your cultural calendar: 7 things to look forward to this year”, in Men's Health, volume 23, number 1, →ISSN, page 134:
      British rockers Radiohead solved the "music is dead" dispute last year by allowing fans to name a price for the group's new album, In Rainbows. (More than a million albums sold in the first week alone, at an average $8 a pop).
  6. Something that stands out or is distinctive to the mind or senses.
    a white dress with a pop of red
    a pop of vanilla flavour
    • 2023 November 4, Kim Duong, Megan Uy, Tarah-Lynn Saint-Elien, “22 Best Shackets to Get You Through the Chilly Fall Weather”, in Cosmopolitan[1]:
      Nothing screams fall like corduroy! I'm loving this deep seafoam green shacket—made of the thick, ribbed material—that'll give a fab pop of color to a muted ensemble.
  7. (computing) The removal of a data item from the top of a stack.
    • 2011, Mark Lutz, Programming Python, page 1371:
      Pushes and pops change the stack; indexing just accesses it.
  8. A bird, the European redwing.
  9. (physics) The sixth derivative of the position vector with respect to time (after velocity, acceleration, jerk, jounce, crackle), i.e. the rate of change of crackle.
  10. (slang, dated) A pistol.
  11. (US, mostly in plural) A small, immature peanut, boiled as a snack.
    • 1986, Mid-America Folklore, volume 14, page 6:
      Immature peanuts, called "pops," are often included when the peanuts are boiled at home []
    • 2013, Becky Billingsley, A Culinary History of Myrtle Beach & the Grand Strand:
      If the peanuts weren't yet mature, boiling them would make the tiny nuts—or “pops,” as they're called at that immature stage—swell up and become more filling.
  12. (colloquial) Clipping of freeze pop.
    • 2017, Kenny Attaway, Black Cream: A Handful of Sky & a Pocketful of Confetti[2]:
      Although they go by many names across the world freezer pop, ice-pole, pop stick icy-pole ice pop, tip top and ice candy but in the hoods of America they are known and respected as Freeze Pops. The pops are made by freezing flavored liquid such as sugar water, Kool-Aid or some form of fruit juice or purée inside a plastic tube - at least the kinds we ate.
  13. (colloquial) A lollipop.
  14. (professional wrestling slang) A (usually very) loud audience reaction.
  15. (music) The pulling of a string away from the fretboard and releasing it so that it snaps back.
Synonyms[edit]
  • (soda pop): see the list at soda
Translations[edit]

Verb[edit]

pop (third-person singular simple present pops, present participle popping, simple past and past participle popped)

  1. (intransitive) To make a pop, or sharp, quick sound.
    The muskets popped away on all sides.
  2. (ergative) To burst (something) with a popping sound.
    The boy with the pin popped the balloon.
    This corn pops well.
    • 1922 October 26, Virginia Woolf, chapter 1, in Jacob’s Room, Richmond, London: [] Leonard & Virginia Woolf at the Hogarth Press, →OCLC; republished London: The Hogarth Press, 1960, →OCLC:
      The waves came round her. She was a rock. She was covered with the seaweed which pops when it is pressed. He was lost.
    • 2011 December 14, Steven Morris, “Devon woman jailed for 168 days for killing kitten in microwave”, in Guardian[3]:
      The court was told Robins had asked if she could use the oven to heat some baby food for her child. Knutton heard a loud popping noise "like a crisp packet being popped" coming from the kitchen followed by a "screeching" noise. When she saw what had happened to the kitten she was sick in the sink.
    • 2016 October 10, Dan Shive, El Goonish Shive (webcomic), Comic for Monday, Oct 10, 2016:
      "To torture another metaphor, it would be the difference between slowly letting the air out of a balloon, and popping it. Though the dam metaphor is more apt, what with the excess magic flooding outward."
  3. (intransitive, with in, out, upon, etc.) To enter, or issue forth, with a quick, sudden movement; to move from place to place suddenly; to dart.
    A rabbit popped out of the hole.
  4. (transitive, UK, Australia) To place (something) (somewhere); to move or position (something) with a short movement.
    Just pop it in the fridge for now.
    He popped his head around the door.
    • 1986, Christina Rossetti, edited by Alfred Knopf, Read-Aloud Rhymes for the Very Young, Mix a Pancake, page 50:
      Mix a pancake,
      Stir a pancake,
      Pop it in the pan; []
  5. (intransitive, UK, Canada, Australia, often with over, round, along, etc.) To make a short trip or visit.
    I'm just popping round to the newsagent.
    I'll pop by your place later today.
  6. (intransitive) To stand out; to be distinctive to the senses.
    This colour really pops.
    • 2011 July 18, Robert Costa, “The Battle from Waterloo: Representative Bachmann runs for president”, in National Review:
      She also looked like a star - and not the Beltway type. On a stage full of stiff suits, she popped.
  7. (transitive) To hit (something or someone).
    He popped me on the nose.
  8. (transitive, slang) To shoot (usually somebody) with a firearm.
  9. (intransitive, vulgar, slang) To ejaculate; to orgasm.
    • 1994 [1993], Irvine Welsh, “Bang to Rites”, in Trainspotting, London: Minerva, →ISBN, page 219:
      Ah concur wi Sharon’s wishes n fuck her in the fanny. [] Ah think aboot how close she is tae poppin and how far up ah am, []
  10. (transitive, computing) To remove (a data item) from the top of a stack.
    • 2010, Enrico Perla, Massimiliano Oldani, A Guide to Kernel Exploitation: Attacking the Core, page 55:
      Once the callee (the called function) terminates, it cleans the stack that it has been locally using and pops the next value stored on top of the stack.
    • 2011, John Mongan, Noah Kindler, Eric Giguère, Programming Interviews Exposed:
      The algorithm pops the stack to obtain a new current node when there are no more children (when it reaches a leaf).
  11. (intransitive, slang) To give birth.
  12. (transitive, slang) To pawn (something) (to raise money).
    I had to pop my watch to see me through until pay-day.
    • 1773, The Westminster Magazine, Or, The Pantheon of Taste:
      I often used to smile at a young Ensign of the Guards, who always popped his sword and watch when he wanted cash for an intrigue; []
  13. (transitive, slang) To swallow or consume (especially a tablet of a drug, sometimes extended to other small items such as sweets or candy).
    • 1994, Ruth Garner, Patricia A. Alexander, Beliefs about text and instruction with text:
      We were drinking beer and popping pills — some really strong downers. I could hardly walk and I had no idea what I was saying.
    • 2008 January–February, “70 Ways to Improve Every Day of the Week”, in Men's Health, volume 23, number 1, →ISSN, page 135:
      31 pop some chocolate You'll stay sharp and focused for that final lunge toward the weekend. Milk chocolate has been shown to boost verbal and visual memory, impulse control, and reaction time.
  14. (transitive, informal) To perform (a move or stunt) while riding a board or vehicle.
    Pop a U-turn. You missed the turnoff.
    • 1995, David Brin, Startide Rising:
      Huck spun along the beams and joists, making me gulp when she popped a wheelie or swerved past a gaping hole...
    • 2009, Ben Wixon, Skateboarding: Instruction, Programming, and Park Design:
      The tail is the back of the deck; this is the part that enables skaters to pop ollies...
  15. (intransitive, of the ears) To undergo equalization of pressure when the Eustachian tubes open.
    My ears popped as the aeroplane began to ascend.
    • 2021 June 30, Tim Dunn, “How we made... Secrets of the London Underground”, in RAIL, number 934, page 49:
      With its airtight seals, the pressure change as trains entered the black, dust-covered station areas caused our ears to pop and doors to flap and bang every time.
  16. (dance) To perform the popping style of dance.
    • 1985, “King of Rock”, performed by Run-DMC:
      Let the poppers pop and the breakers break / We're cool, cool cats, it's like that
  17. (transitive, slang) To arrest.
    He's on probation. We can pop him right now for gang association.
    • 2021, Brandon Taylor, “Filthy Animals”, in Filthy Animals, Daunt Books Originals, page 131:
      On the night Nolan got popped, the same cop delivered Milton home in the back of the cruiser, but didn’t turn the lights on.
  18. (music) To pull a string away from the fretboard and release it so that it snaps back.
Translations[edit]

Interjection[edit]

pop

  1. A loud, sharp sound, as of a cork coming out of a bottle.
    • 1899 February, Joseph Conrad, “The Heart of Darkness”, in Blackwood’s Edinburgh Magazine, volume CLXV, number M, New York, N.Y.: The Leonard Scott Publishing Company, [], →OCLC, part I, page 203:
      Pop, would go one of the eight-inch guns; a small flame would dart and vanish, a little white smoke would disappear, a tiny projectile would give a feeble screech - and nothing happened.
    • 1908, Kenneth Grahame, The Wind in the Willows, New York: Charles Scribner's Sons, page 2:
      So he scraped and scratched and scrabbled and scrooged and then he scrooged again and scrabbled and scratched and scraped, working busily with his little paws and muttering to himself, 'Up we go! Up we go!' till at last, pop! his snout came out into the sunlight, and he found himself rolling in the warm grass of a great meadow.
Translations[edit]

Derived terms[edit]

Terms derived from pop (Etymology 1, all parts of speech)

Etymology 2[edit]

From papa or poppa.

Noun[edit]

pop (plural pops)

  1. (colloquial, endearing) One's father.
    My pop used to tell me to do my homework every night.
Derived terms[edit]
Translations[edit]
See also[edit]

Etymology 3[edit]

Clipping of popular or population.

Adjective[edit]

pop (not comparable)

  1. (used attributively in set phrases) Popular.

Noun[edit]

pop (uncountable)

  1. Pop music.
  2. Population.
    (Can we add an example for this sense?)
Translations[edit]

Derived terms[edit]

Etymology 4[edit]

From colloquial Russian поп (pop) and Попъ (Pop), from Old Church Slavonic попъ (popŭ), from Byzantine Greek πάπας (pápas) (see pope). Doublet of pope.

Alternative forms[edit]

Noun[edit]

pop (plural pops)

  1. (Russian Orthodoxy, uncommon) A Russian Orthodox parish priest.
    • 1822, Mikhaïlov Vasiliï, Adventures of Michailow, section 4:
      There was at that time in the house of the Consul a Pop (or Russian Priest) named Iwan Afanassich.
    • 2001, Spas Raïkin, Rebel with a Just Cause, 292 n.28:
      The contemporary priest's... own children are ashamed and some abusers are openly "transmitting the pop" (a gesture of mocking the priest on the street, where a man would touch his private parts while smiling at other passers-by)
    • 2006, Peter Neville, A Traveller's History of Russia, section 123:
      By the end of 1809 she was declaring to all and sundry that she would sooner marry 'a pop than the sovereign of a country under the influence of France'. Since a pop was a Russian Orthodox parish priest, the reference was hardly likely to endear her family to the French.

Anagrams[edit]

Afrikaans[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Dutch pop.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

pop (plural poppe, diminutive poppie)

  1. doll

Catalan[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

Inherited from Latin polypus, from Ancient Greek πολύπους (polúpous).

Noun[edit]

pop m (plural pops)

  1. octopus
Alternative forms[edit]
See also[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

Abbreviation of popular.

Adjective[edit]

pop (invariable)

  1. popular

Further reading[edit]

Dutch[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Middle Dutch poppe, from Latin pupa; sense of “cocoon, pupa” from New Latin. The sense “guilder” derived from student slang as a reference to the image of the Dutch Maiden on guilders from 1694 until the early nineteenth century.

Noun[edit]

pop f (plural poppen, diminutive popje n or poppetje n)

  1. cocoon, pupa
    Synonym: cocon
  2. doll
    Synonym: (Belgium) poppemie
  3. As a term for a girl or woman:
    1. (often diminutive) A term of endearment: darling, sweetheart.
    2. A pretty girl or young woman.
      Synonym: (Belgium) poppemie
    3. (often derogatory) A girl or woman who wears a lot of make-up.
      Synonym: (Belgium) poppemie
  4. (Netherlands, colloquial) guilder
    Synonym: gulden
Derived terms[edit]
Descendants[edit]
  • Berbice Creole Dutch: pubiki (from the diminutive form)
  • Petjo: pop
  • Indonesian: pop
  • Papiamentu: pòpchi, pouchi (Aruba), poptsje
  • Sranan Tongo: popki (from the diminutive form)

Verb[edit]

pop

  1. inflection of poppen:
    1. first-person singular present indicative
    2. imperative

Etymology 2[edit]

From English pop, possibly through shortening of popmuziek.

Noun[edit]

pop f (uncountable)

  1. pop, pop music
Derived terms[edit]

Finnish[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From English pop.

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /ˈpop/, [ˈpo̞p]
  • Rhymes: -op
  • Syllabification(key): pop

Adjective[edit]

pop (not comparable)

  1. (chiefly in compounds) pop (popular)

Noun[edit]

pop

  1. pop (popular music)

Declension[edit]

Inflection of pop (Kotus type 5/risti, no gradation)
nominative pop popit
genitive popin popien
partitive popia popeja
illative popiin popeihin
singular plural
nominative pop popit
accusative nom. pop popit
gen. popin
genitive popin popien
partitive popia popeja
inessive popissa popeissa
elative popista popeista
illative popiin popeihin
adessive popilla popeilla
ablative popilta popeilta
allative popille popeille
essive popina popeina
translative popiksi popeiksi
abessive popitta popeitta
instructive popein
comitative See the possessive forms below.
Possessive forms of pop (Kotus type 5/risti, no gradation)
first-person singular possessor
singular plural
nominative popini popini
accusative nom. popini popini
gen. popini
genitive popini popieni
partitive popiani popejani
inessive popissani popeissani
elative popistani popeistani
illative popiini popeihini
adessive popillani popeillani
ablative popiltani popeiltani
allative popilleni popeilleni
essive popinani popeinani
translative popikseni popeikseni
abessive popittani popeittani
instructive
comitative popeineni
second-person singular possessor
singular plural
nominative popisi popisi
accusative nom. popisi popisi
gen. popisi
genitive popisi popiesi
partitive popiasi popejasi
inessive popissasi popeissasi
elative popistasi popeistasi
illative popiisi popeihisi
adessive popillasi popeillasi
ablative popiltasi popeiltasi
allative popillesi popeillesi
essive popinasi popeinasi
translative popiksesi popeiksesi
abessive popittasi popeittasi
instructive
comitative popeinesi
first-person plural possessor
singular plural
nominative popimme popimme
accusative nom. popimme popimme
gen. popimme
genitive popimme popiemme
partitive popiamme popejamme
inessive popissamme popeissamme
elative popistamme popeistamme
illative popiimme popeihimme
adessive popillamme popeillamme
ablative popiltamme popeiltamme
allative popillemme popeillemme
essive popinamme popeinamme
translative popiksemme popeiksemme
abessive popittamme popeittamme
instructive
comitative popeinemme
second-person plural possessor
singular plural
nominative popinne popinne
accusative nom. popinne popinne
gen. popinne
genitive popinne popienne
partitive popianne popejanne
inessive popissanne popeissanne
elative popistanne popeistanne
illative popiinne popeihinne
adessive popillanne popeillanne
ablative popiltanne popeiltanne
allative popillenne popeillenne
essive popinanne popeinanne
translative popiksenne popeiksenne
abessive popittanne popeittanne
instructive
comitative popeinenne
third-person possessor
singular plural
nominative popinsa popinsa
accusative nom. popinsa popinsa
gen. popinsa
genitive popinsa popiensa
partitive popiaan
popiansa
popejaan
popejansa
inessive popissaan
popissansa
popeissaan
popeissansa
elative popistaan
popistansa
popeistaan
popeistansa
illative popiinsa popeihinsa
adessive popillaan
popillansa
popeillaan
popeillansa
ablative popiltaan
popiltansa
popeiltaan
popeiltansa
allative popilleen
popillensa
popeilleen
popeillensa
essive popinaan
popinansa
popeinaan
popeinansa
translative popikseen
popiksensa
popeikseen
popeiksensa
abessive popittaan
popittansa
popeittaan
popeittansa
instructive
comitative popeineen
popeinensa

Further reading[edit]

French[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Adjective[edit]

pop (feminine pope, masculine plural pops, feminine plural popes)

  1. pop (popular)

Noun[edit]

pop m (plural pop)

  1. pop, pop music

Synonyms[edit]

Further reading[edit]

Hungarian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From English pop(ular).[1]

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

pop (plural popok)

  1. (music) pop, pop music

Declension[edit]

Inflection (stem in -o-, back harmony)
singular plural
nominative pop popok
accusative popot popokat
dative popnak popoknak
instrumental poppal popokkal
causal-final popért popokért
translative poppá popokká
terminative popig popokig
essive-formal popként popokként
essive-modal
inessive popban popokban
superessive popon popokon
adessive popnál popoknál
illative popba popokba
sublative popra popokra
allative pophoz popokhoz
elative popból popokból
delative popról popokról
ablative poptól popoktól
non-attributive
possessive - singular
popé popoké
non-attributive
possessive - plural
popéi popokéi
Possessive forms of pop
possessor single possession multiple possessions
1st person sing. popom popjaim
2nd person sing. popod popjaid
3rd person sing. popja popjai
1st person plural popunk popjaink
2nd person plural popotok popjaitok
3rd person plural popjuk popjaik

Derived terms[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Tótfalusi, István. Idegenszó-tár: Idegen szavak értelmező és etimológiai szótára (’A Storehouse of Foreign Words: an explanatory and etymological dictionary of foreign words’). Budapest: Tinta Könyvkiadó, 2005. →ISBN

Indonesian[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): [ˈpɔp̚]
  • Hyphenation: pop

Etymology 1[edit]

From clipping of populer.

Adjective[edit]

pop

  1. popular.

Etymology 2[edit]

From Dutch pop, from New Latin pupa. Doublet of pupa and popi.

Noun[edit]

pop (first-person possessive popku, second-person possessive popmu, third-person possessive popnya)

  1. (colloquial) doll.
    Synonym: boneka

Further reading[edit]

Jakaltek[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Mayan *pohp.

Noun[edit]

pop

  1. reed mat

References[edit]

  • Church, Clarence; Church, Katherine (1955) Vocabulario castellano-jacalteco, jacalteco-castellano[5] (in Spanish), Guatemala C. A.: Instituto Lingüístico de Verano, pages 47; 41

Navajo[edit]

Particle[edit]

pop

  1. (slang) flirting
    Shichʼįʼ nił pop!
    You’re flirting with me!

Polish[edit]

Polish Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia pl

Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

Borrowed from English pop music.

Noun[edit]

pop m inan

  1. pop music
Declension[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

Borrowed from Old Czech pop.

Noun[edit]

pop m pers

  1. Eastern Orthodox priest
    Synonym: (colloquial) batiuszka
Declension[edit]

Further reading[edit]

  • pop in Wielki słownik języka polskiego, Instytut Języka Polskiego PAN
  • pop in Polish dictionaries at PWN

Portuguese[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Unadapted borrowing from English pop.

Pronunciation[edit]

 

Noun[edit]

pop m (uncountable)

  1. pop (music intended for or accepted by a wide audience)
    Synonym: música pop

Related terms[edit]

Romanian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Unadapted borrowing from English pop.

Adjective[edit]

pop m or f or n (indeclinable)

  1. (music) pop

Declension[edit]

Noun[edit]

pop n (uncountable)

  1. (music) pop, pop music

Declension[edit]

Serbo-Croatian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old Church Slavonic попъ (popŭ), from Ancient Greek πάπας (pápas), variant of πάππας (páppas, daddy, papa).

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

pȍp m (Cyrillic spelling по̏п)

  1. priest (usually Catholic or Orthodox)

Declension[edit]

Slavomolisano[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Serbo-Croatian pop.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

pop m

  1. priest

Declension[edit]

References[edit]

  • Walter Breu and Giovanni Piccoli (2000), Dizionario croato molisano di Acquaviva Collecroce: Dizionario plurilingue della lingua slava della minoranza di provenienza dalmata di Acquaviva Collecroce in Provincia di Campobasso (Parte grammaticale)., pp. 395

Slovak[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

Derived from Old Church Slavonic попъ (popŭ), from Ancient Greek πάπας (pápas), variant of πάππας (páppas, daddy, papa).

Noun[edit]

pop m anim (genitive singular popa, nominative plural popi, declension pattern of chlap)

  1. priest (usually Catholic or Orthodox)
Declension[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

Borrowed from English pop.

Noun[edit]

pop m inan (genitive singular popu, declension pattern of dub)

  1. pop music, pop
Declension[edit]

Further reading[edit]

  • pop”, in Slovníkový portál Jazykovedného ústavu Ľ. Štúra SAV [Dictionary portal of the Ľ. Štúr Institute of Linguistics, Slovak Academy of Science] (in Slovak), https://slovnik.juls.savba.sk, 2024

Spanish[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /ˈpop/ [ˈpop]
  • Rhymes: -op
  • Syllabification: pop

Noun[edit]

pop m (plural pops)

  1. (Uruguay) popcorn
    Synonyms: see Thesaurus:palomita
  2. pop, pop music

Derived terms[edit]

Further reading[edit]

Swedish[edit]

Noun[edit]

pop c

  1. pop (pop music)
    Synonym: popmusik
    • 1965, Thore Skogman (lyrics and music), “Pop opp i topp [Pop (up) to the top]”, performed by Thore Skogman and Lill-Babs:
      Pop opp [alternative form of upp] i topp, det är toppen i år. Pop, pop, pop opp i topp, pop. Pop opp i topp, så att pulsarna slår. Pop opp i topp, pop.
      Pop to the top, it's great this year. Pop, pop, pop to the top, pop. Pop to the top, so that the pulses beat. Pop to the top, pop.

Declension[edit]

Declension of pop 
Singular Plural
Indefinite Definite Indefinite Definite
Nominative pop popen, poppen - -
Genitive pops popens, poppens - -

Derived terms[edit]

Noun[edit]

pop c

  1. a pop (Russian Orthodox priest)

Declension[edit]

Declension of pop 
Singular Plural
Indefinite Definite Indefinite Definite
Nominative pop popen poper poperna
Genitive pops popens popers popernas

References[edit]

Tok Pisin[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From English Pope.

Noun[edit]

pop

  1. Pope

Turkish[edit]

Noun[edit]

pop (definite accusative popu, plural poplar)

  1. pop
  2. Pop music

Declension[edit]

Inflection
Nominative pop
Definite accusative popu
Singular Plural
Nominative pop poplar
Definite accusative popu popları
Dative popa poplara
Locative popta poplarda
Ablative poptan poplardan
Genitive popun popların
Possessive forms
Nominative
Singular Plural
1st singular popum poplarım
2nd singular popun popların
3rd singular popu popları
1st plural popumuz poplarımız
2nd plural popunuz poplarınız
3rd plural popları popları
Definite accusative
Singular Plural
1st singular popumu poplarımı
2nd singular popunu poplarını
3rd singular popunu poplarını
1st plural popumuzu poplarımızı
2nd plural popunuzu poplarınızı
3rd plural poplarını poplarını
Dative
Singular Plural
1st singular popuma poplarıma
2nd singular popuna poplarına
3rd singular popuna poplarına
1st plural popumuza poplarımıza
2nd plural popunuza poplarınıza
3rd plural poplarına poplarına
Locative
Singular Plural
1st singular popumda poplarımda
2nd singular popunda poplarında
3rd singular popunda poplarında
1st plural popumuzda poplarımızda
2nd plural popunuzda poplarınızda
3rd plural poplarında poplarında
Ablative
Singular Plural
1st singular popumdan poplarımdan
2nd singular popundan poplarından
3rd singular popundan poplarından
1st plural popumuzdan poplarımızdan
2nd plural popunuzdan poplarınızdan
3rd plural poplarından poplarından
Genitive
Singular Plural
1st singular popumun poplarımın
2nd singular popunun poplarının
3rd singular popunun poplarının
1st plural popumuzun poplarımızın
2nd plural popunuzun poplarınızın
3rd plural poplarının poplarının

Volapük[edit]

Noun[edit]

pop (nominative plural pops)

  1. (obsolete, Volapük Rigik) people, nation

Declension[edit]

Synonyms[edit]

  • pöp (Volapük Nulik)

Derived terms[edit]

Welsh[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From English pop.

Pronunciation[edit]

Adjective[edit]

pop (feminine singular pop, plural pop, not comparable)

  1. pop (popular)

Derived terms[edit]

Noun[edit]

pop m

  1. pop (pop music)
    Synonym: cerddoriaeth bop

Mutation[edit]

Welsh mutation
radical soft nasal aspirate
pop bop mhop phop
Note: Some of these forms may be hypothetical. Not every possible mutated form of every word actually occurs.

Further reading[edit]

  • R. J. Thomas, G. A. Bevan, P. J. Donovan, A. Hawke et al., editors (1950–present), “pop”, in Geiriadur Prifysgol Cymru Online (in Welsh), University of Wales Centre for Advanced Welsh & Celtic Studies

West Frisian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

(This etymology is missing or incomplete. Please add to it, or discuss it at the Etymology scriptorium.)

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

pop c (plural poppen, diminutive popke)

  1. baby
  2. doll, dummy, puppet
  3. dear, darling

Further reading[edit]

  • pop”, in Wurdboek fan de Fryske taal (in Dutch), 2011