bop

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See also: BOP, Bop, bóp, bớp, and вор

English[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /bɒp/
  • (file)
  • Rhymes: -ɒp

Etymology 1[edit]

Imitative of the sound made.

Noun[edit]

bop (plural bops)

  1. (colloquial, onomatopoeia) A very light smack, blow or punch.

Verb[edit]

bop (third-person singular simple present bops, present participle bopping, simple past and past participle bopped)

  1. (colloquial, transitive) To strike gently or playfully.
    • 2013, Karin Tanabe, The List, page 37:
      “Better him than me,” I said while my mother fluttered her blue eyes at me and bopped me on the nose with a wooden spoon.
Synonyms[edit]
Derived terms[edit]
Translations[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

Shortened from bebop.

Noun[edit]

bop (countable and uncountable, plural bops)

  1. (uncountable, music) A style of improvised jazz from the 1940s.
    • 1957, Jack Kerouac, chapter 13, in On the Road, Viking Press, OCLC 43419454:
      That grand wild sound of bop floated from beer parlors; it mixed medleys with every kind of cowboy and boogie-woogie in the American night.
  2. (countable, Oxbridge slang) A party hosted by a college's JCR or MCR.
    • 2005, Johnny Rich, Push Guide to Which University, page 472:
      Theatres; Music House used for bands; May Ball; very popular weekly bops in JCR and MCR; library (57,000 books); 40 networked PCs, 24-hrs.
    • 2012, Owen Jones, Chavs: The Demonization of the Working Class, page 120:
      At universities like Oxford, middle-class students hold 'chav bops' where they dress up as this working-class caricature.
  3. (slang, countable) A good song.
    • 2020, Paper Idol, an E-Mail quoted by Genius contributors on the said single[1]:
      Clouds is a little bop I wrote during quarantine. The melody came out of nowhere and the song came together magically. A song about my confusion made me much less confused, and I hope you all feel the same when you hear it.
Derived terms[edit]

Verb[edit]

bop (third-person singular simple present bops, present participle bopping, simple past and past participle bopped)

  1. To dance to this music, or any sort of music with a marked beat.
    • 2019 February 17, Chris Mench, “Blueface Wants People To Pay Attention To His Lyrics, Not Just Bop To His Music”, in Genius News[2]:
      I’d rather you be stiff with a stuck look on your face than just bopping, not even listening to what a nigga saying.
    • 2020 October 8, Tall Boy Special (lyrics and music), “Clothes”‎[3]:
      The hat was sorta dancing, just bopping around
      Floating in the air six feet above the ground

Etymology 3[edit]

Variant of whop (to move around quickly with an impact) as well as from the dances above interpreted as a manner of locomotion.

Verb[edit]

bop (third-person singular simple present bops, present participle bopping, simple past and past participle bopped)

  1. (slang, MLE, transitive, intransitive) To walk the streets while socializing.
    • 2019 July 31, Aitch (lyrics), “Taste (Make It Shake)”‎[4]:
      I'm just bopping, give a fuck who's in the place

      In the music video around this line, he is walking on road and barely dancing.

  2. (slang, transitive, intransitive) To have sex.
    Synonyms: see Thesaurus:copulate
    • 2002, Tim Cockey, The Hearse You Came In On:
      I'm here because your wife and I have been bopping like bunnies. Here are the pictures to prove it.
    • 2012, Taylor, Terrence Oral, Dancing with the Boogie Man, page 196:
      [] You aren't the Boy Scout you pretend to be. I'll bet you two bopped all night long.” Colin shook his head. “You're wrong. We didn't.” “You just took her home?” “That's about it.”
  3. (slang, transitive, intransitive) To fellate.
    • 2016 June 28, Loski (lyrics), “Hazards”‎[5], performed by Loski, 2:39:
      Squa' said she just done the 6, now she on the ends just boppin' (Bad, she bad)
      Now she on the ends just boppin (Boppin')

      The rapper's gestures do not leave room for ambiguity.

Anagrams[edit]


Swedish[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Unadapted borrowing from English bop.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

bop c (uncountable)

  1. (jazz) bebop

Declension[edit]

Declension of bop 
Uncountable
Indefinite Definite
Nominative bop bopen
Genitive bops bopens

References[edit]


Welsh[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

bop

  1. Soft mutation of pop.

Mutation[edit]

Welsh mutation
radical soft nasal aspirate
pop bop mhop phop
Note: Some of these forms may be hypothetical. Not every possible mutated form of every word actually occurs.