smack

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English[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Middle English smac, smak, smacke, from Old English smæċ ‎(taste, smatch), from Proto-Germanic *smakkuz ‎(a taste), from Proto-Indo-European *smegʰ-, *smeg- ‎(to taste). Cognate with English dialectal smatch, Scots smak ‎(scent, smell, taste, flavour), Saterland Frisian Smoak ‎(taste), West Frisian smaak ‎(taste), Dutch smaak ‎(taste), German Schmack, Geschmack ‎(taste), Swedish smak ‎(taste). Akin to Old English smæccan ‎(to taste, smack). More at smake, smatch.

Noun[edit]

smack ‎(plural smacks)

  1. A distinct flavor.
  2. A slight trace of something; a smattering.
  3. (slang) Heroin.
Derived terms[edit]
Translations[edit]

Verb[edit]

smack ‎(third-person singular simple present smacks, present participle smacking, simple past and past participle smacked)

  1. To indicate or suggest something.
    Her reckless behavior smacks of pride.
    • Shakespeare
      All sects, all ages, smack of this vice.
  2. To have a particular taste.
Derived terms[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

From Middle Low German smack (Low German Schmacke, Schmaake ‎(small ship)) or Dutch smak.

Noun[edit]

smack ‎(plural smacks)

  1. A small sailing vessel, commonly rigged as a sloop, used chiefly in the coasting and fishing trade and often called a fishing smack.

Etymology 3[edit]

From or akin to Dutch smakken ‎(to fling down), Plautdietsch schmaksen ‎(to smack the lips), regional German schmacken, Schmackes ‎(vigour) (compare Swedish smak ‎(slap), Middle Low German smacken, the first part of Saterland Frisian smakmuulje ‎(smack)).

Noun[edit]

smack ‎(plural smacks)

  1. A sharp blow; a slap. See also: spank.
  2. A loud kiss.
    • Shakespeare
      a clamorous smack
  3. A quick, sharp noise, as of the lips when suddenly separated, or of a whip.
Translations[edit]

Verb[edit]

smack ‎(third-person singular simple present smacks, present participle smacking, simple past and past participle smacked)

  1. To slap someone, or to make a smacking sound.
    • Benjamin Disraeli
      A horse neighed, and a whip smacked, there was a whistle, and the sound of a cart wheel.
  2. (New Zealand) To strike a child (usually on the buttocks) as a form of discipline. (US spank)
  3. To wetly separate the lips, making a noise, after tasting something or in expectation of a treat.
    • 1763, Robert Lloyd, “A Familiar Epistle” in St. James Magazine:
      But when, obedient to the mode / Of panegyric, courtly ode / The bard bestrides, his annual hack, / In vain I taste, and sip and smack, / I find no flavour of the Sack.
  4. To kiss with a close compression of the lips, so as to make a sound when they separate.
Translations[edit]

Adverb[edit]

smack ‎(comparative more smack, superlative most smack)

  1. As if with a smack or slap
    Right smack bang in the middle.
Derived terms[edit]

Anagrams[edit]


Swedish[edit]

Noun[edit]

smack n

  1. (in the phrase "inte ett smack") smidgeon, piece, small bit

See also[edit]