disco

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See also: discó

English[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From a shortening of discotheque, from French discothèque.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

disco ‎(countable and uncountable, plural discos)

  1. (countable, slightly dated) A short form of discotheque, a nightclub for dancing.
  2. (uncountable) A genre of dance music that was popular in the 1970s, characterized by elements of soul music with a strong Latin-American beat and often accompanied by pulsating lights.

Synonyms[edit]

Translations[edit]

Verb[edit]

disco ‎(third-person singular simple present discos, present participle discoing, simple past and past participle discoed)

  1. (intransitive) To dance disco-style dances.
  2. (intransitive) To go to discotheques.
    • 2009 February 16, Cathy Horyn, “Designers Square Off: Sexy vs. Classy”, New York Times:
      Learning that a discoing sex appeal has returned to the runways is a little like hearing that Barbra Streisand and Barry Gibb are reuniting.

Anagrams[edit]


Finnish[edit]

Noun[edit]

disco

  1. Alternative form of disko

Declension[edit]

Inflection of disco (Kotus type 1/valo, no gradation)
nominative disco discot
genitive discon discojen
partitive discoa discoja
illative discoon discoihin
singular plural
nominative disco discot
accusative nom.? disco discot
gen. discon
genitive discon discojen
partitive discoa discoja
inessive discossa discoissa
elative discosta discoista
illative discoon discoihin
adessive discolla discoilla
ablative discolta discoilta
allative discolleˣ discoilleˣ
essive discona discoina
translative discoksi discoiksi
instructive discoin
abessive discotta discoitta
comitative discoineen

Italian[edit]

Italian Wikipedia has an article on:

Wikipedia it

Etymology[edit]

Borrowed from Latin discus, whence also Italian desco (an inherited doublet).

Pronunciation[edit]

disco, /ˈdisko/, /"disko/

Noun[edit]

disco m ‎(plural dischi)

  1. disc, disk
  2. (anatomy) disc

Synonyms[edit]

Related terms[edit]

Anagrams[edit]


Latin[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Proto-Italic *dikskō, reduplicated form of Proto-Indo-European *deḱ-. Cognates include Ancient Greek διδάσκω ‎(didáskō), δεδαώς ‎(dedaṓs), δαῆναι ‎(daênai), δέχομαι ‎(dékhomai). Also compare doceō.

Verb[edit]

discō ‎(present infinitive discere, perfect active didicī, supine discitum); third conjugation

  1. I learn
    Aut disce aut discede.
    Either learn or go away.
  2. (drama) I study, practice
Inflection[edit]
   Conjugation of disco (third conjugation)
indicative singular plural
first second third first second third
active present discō discis discit discimus discitis discunt
imperfect discēbam discēbās discēbat discēbāmus discēbātis discēbant
future discam discēs discet discēmus discētis discent
perfect didicī didicistī didicit didicimus didicistis didicērunt, didicēre
pluperfect didiceram didicerās didicerat didicerāmus didicerātis didicerant
future perfect didicerō didiceris didicerit didicerimus didiceritis didicerint
passive present discor disceris, discere discitur discimur disciminī discuntur
imperfect discēbar discēbāris, discēbāre discēbātur discēbāmur discēbāminī discēbantur
future discar discēris, discēre discētur discēmur discēminī discentur
perfect discitus + present active indicative of sum
pluperfect discitus + imperfect active indicative of sum
future perfect discitus + future active indicative of sum
subjunctive singular plural
first second third first second third
active present discam discās discat discāmus discātis discant
imperfect discerem discerēs disceret discerēmus discerētis discerent
perfect didicerim didicerīs didicerit didicerīmus didicerītis didicerint
pluperfect didicissem didicissēs didicisset didicissēmus didicissētis didicissent
passive present discar discāris, discāre discātur discāmur discāminī discantur
imperfect discerer discerēris, discerēre discerētur discerēmur discerēminī discerentur
perfect discitus + present active subjunctive of sum
pluperfect discitus + imperfect active subjunctive of sum
imperative singular plural
first second third first second third
active present disce discite
future discitō discitō discitōte discuntō
passive present discere disciminī
future discitor discitor discuntor
non-finite forms active passive
present perfect future present perfect future
infinitives discere didicisse discitūrus esse discī discitus esse discitum īrī
participles discēns discitūrus discitus discendus
Derived terms[edit]
Related terms[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

Noun[edit]

discō

  1. dative singular of discus
  2. ablative singular of discus

Portuguese[edit]

Noun[edit]

disco m (plural discos)

  1. disc (a thin, flat, circular plate)
  2. (uncountable) disco (type of music)

Related terms[edit]


Spanish[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

Short for discoteca.

Noun[edit]

disco f ‎(plural discos)

  1. club, discotheque

Etymology 2[edit]

Borrowed from Latin discus, from Ancient Greek δίσκος ‎(dískos).

Noun[edit]

disco m ‎(plural discos)

  1. disc
  2. phonograph record or disc
  3. rotary dial
  4. (sports) discus

Related terms[edit]

Verb[edit]

disco

  1. First-person singular (yo) present indicative form of discar.

Swedish[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Noun[edit]

disco n

  1. a disco, a discotheque
  2. disco; a type of music

Declension[edit]

Synonyms[edit]

Related terms[edit]