disc

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See also: Disc.

English[edit]

Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From French disque, from Latin discus, from Ancient Greek δίσκος (dískos, disk, quoit, platter).

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

disc (plural discs)

  1. A thin, flat, circular plate or similar object.
    A coin is a disc of metal.
  2. (anatomy) An intervertebral disc.
  3. Something resembling a disc.
    Venus's disc cut off light from the Sun.
  4. A vinyl phonograph / gramophone record.
    Turn the disc over, after it has finished.

Usage notes[edit]

See usage notes at the disk entry.

Translations[edit]

Anagrams[edit]


Catalan[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Borrowed from Latin discus, originally from Ancient Greek δίσκος (dískos, disk, quoit, platter).

Noun[edit]

disc m (plural discs or discos)

  1. disc
  2. (computing) disk
  3. (sports) discus

Derived terms[edit]


Old English[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Germanic *disk-, from Latin discus, originally from Ancient Greek δίσκος (dískos, disk, quoit, platter). Cognate with Old Saxon disk, Old Dutch disc (Dutch dis (table)), Old High German tisc (German Tisch (table)), Old Norse diskr (plate).

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

disċ m (nominative plural disċas)

  1. plate, bowl

Descendants[edit]


Old Saxon[edit]

Noun[edit]

disc m

  1. Alternative spelling of disk

Romanian[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

Borrowed from French disque, Latin discus, originally from Ancient Greek δίσκος (dískos, disk, quoit, platter).

Noun[edit]

disc n (plural discuri)

  1. (technology) disk, disc
  2. (music) disk
  3. (sports) discus
  4. (anatomy) disc

Etymology 2[edit]

From Greek δίσκος (dískos), partly through a Slavic intermediate disk(o)ŭ.

Noun[edit]

disc n (plural discuri)

  1. disk (flat round object), especially one used in church services to collect money
See also[edit]