vinyl

Definition from Wiktionary, the free dictionary
Jump to navigation Jump to search
See also: Vinyl

English[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin vīnum (wine) +‎ -yl. Derived from Latin vīnum because ethyl alcohol is the ordinary alcohol present in wine.

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /ˈvaɪ.nəl/, /ˈvaɪ.nɪl/
  • enPR: vīʹnəl, vīʹnĭl
  • (file)
  • Rhymes: -aɪnəl, -aɪnɪl

Noun[edit]

vinyl (countable and uncountable, plural vinyls)

  1. (chemistry, uncountable) The univalent radical CH2=CH−, derived from ethylene.
  2. (countable) Any of various compounds and substances containing the vinyl radical, especially various tough, flexible, shiny plastics.
    Hyponyms: polyvinyl chloride, PVC
  3. (music, collectively, uncountable) Phonograph records as a medium.
    Many DJs prefer vinyl to CDs.
  4. (music, countable) A phonograph record.
    Coordinate term: acetate
    • 2011, David Eagleman, Why the Net Matters, Canongate Books (→ISBN)
      This is a tangible example of the net's natural flow toward improved environmental outcomes. Although some people lament the loss of flipping through CDs, or eight-tracks, or vinyls, there is a clear upside to dematerialization.

Derived terms[edit]

Descendants[edit]

Translations[edit]

Adjective[edit]

vinyl (not comparable)

  1. (chemistry) Containing the vinyl radical.
    Synonym: vinylic
  2. Made of polyvinyl chloride.
  3. (music) Pertaining to a phonograph record.
    • 1979, “Boogie Wonderland”, in I Am, performed by Earth, Wind & Fire:
      Dance, boogie wonderland / Sound fly through the night / I chase my vinyl dreams to boogie wonderland
    • 2015, Dominik Bartmanski, Ian Woodward, Vinyl: The Analogue Record in the Digital Age, Bloomsbury Publishing (→ISBN), page 48:
      After being gifted a turntable and investing in relatively inexpensive speakers, he talks about becoming reacquainted with the Impulse vinyl version of John Coltrane's celebrated jazz album, A Love Supreme.

Translations[edit]

Further reading[edit]