dis

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English[edit]

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Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

Abbreviation of disrespect.

Verb[edit]

dis ‎(third-person singular simple present disses, present participle dissing, simple past and past participle dissed)

  1. (informal) Alternative spelling of diss
Translations[edit]

Noun[edit]

dis ‎(plural disses)

  1. Alternative form of diss
Translations[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

From Old Norse dís.

Noun[edit]

dis ‎(plural disir)

  1. Any of a group of minor female deities in Scandinavian folklore.
    • 1851, Thorpe, Benjamin, Northern Mythology, E Lumley, page 116:
      In Norway the Dîsir appear to have been held in great veneration.
    • 1993, Davidson, Hilda Ellis, The Lost Beliefs of Northern Europe, Routledge, page 113:
      A number of places in Norway and Sweden were also named after the Disir
    • 1997, ‘Egil's Saga’, tr. Bernard Scudder, The Sagas of Icelanders (Penguin 2001, p. 67)
      Bard had prepared a feast for him, because a sacrifice was being made to the disir.

Etymology 3[edit]

Representing a colloquial or dialectal pronunciation of this.

Determiner[edit]

dis

  1. (slang or eye dialect) This.

Pronoun[edit]

dis

  1. (slang or eye dialect) This.

Anagrams[edit]


Afrikaans[edit]

Abbreviation[edit]

dis

  1. Abbreviation of dit is (this's, that's, it's)

Danish[edit]

Verb[edit]

dis

  1. imperative of disse

Dutch[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Cognate with German Tisch(table).

Noun[edit]

dis m ‎(plural dissen, diminutive disje n)

  1. (dated) table

Synonyms[edit]

Derived terms[edit]


French[edit]

Verb[edit]

dis

  1. first-person singular present indicative of dire
  2. second-person singular present indicative of dire
  3. first-person singular past historic of dire
  4. second-person singular past historic of dire
  5. second-person singular imperative of dire

Galician[edit]

Verb[edit]

dis

  1. second-person singular present indicative of dicir

German[edit]

Pronoun[edit]

dis

  1. Obsolete spelling of dies

Haitian Creole[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From French dix.

Numeral[edit]

dis

  1. (cardinal) ten

Ladin[edit]

Noun[edit]

dis

  1. plural of

Latin[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

Contracted form of dīves.

Adjective[edit]

dīs m, f, n ‎(genitive dītis); third declension

  1. rich, wealthy
    Apud Helvetios longe nobilissimus fuit et ditissimus Orgetorix.
    By far the noblest and wealthiest man among the Helvetii was Orgetorix. — Caesar, The Gallic War, I.ii
Inflection[edit]

Third declension.

Number Singular Plural
Case / Gender Masc./Fem. Neuter Masc./Fem. Neuter
nominative dīs dītēs dītia
genitive dītis dītium
dative dītī dītibus
accusative dītem dīs dītēs dītia
ablative dītī dītibus
vocative dīs dītēs dītia

Etymology 2[edit]

Inflected form of deus(god).

Noun[edit]

dīs

  1. dative plural of deus
  2. ablative plural of deus

References[edit]

  • dis in Charlton T. Lewis and Charles Short (1879) A Latin Dictionary, Oxford: Clarendon Press
  • dis in Charlton T. Lewis (1891) An Elementary Latin Dictionary, New York: Harper & Brothers
  • DIS in Charles du Fresne du Cange’s Glossarium Mediæ et Infimæ Latinitatis (augmented edition, 1883–1887)
  • Meissner, Carl; Auden, Henry William (1894) Latin Phrase-Book[1], London: Macmillan and Co.
    • (ambiguous) to give thanks to heaven: grates agere (dis immortalibus)
    • (ambiguous) to thank, glorify the immortal gods: grates, laudes agere dis immortalibus
    • (ambiguous) with the help of the gods: dis bene iuvantibus (Fam. 7. 20. 2)
    • (ambiguous) to sacrifice: rem divinam facere (dis)
  • dis in William Smith, editor (1848) A Dictionary of Greek Biography and Mythology, London: John Murray

Louisiana Creole French[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From French dix(ten).

Numeral[edit]

dis

  1. (cardinal) ten

Mauritian Creole[edit]

Mauritian Creole cardinal numbers
 <  9 10 11  > 
    Cardinal : dis
    Ordinal : diziem

Etymology[edit]

From French dix.

Numeral[edit]

dis

  1. (cardinal) ten

Nigerian Pidgin[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From English this.

Determiner[edit]

dis

  1. this

Norman[edit]

Verb[edit]

dis

  1. first-person singular preterite of dithe

Northern Sami[edit]

Pronoun[edit]

dis

  1. locative of dii

Norwegian Bokmål[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From German Low German dis

Noun[edit]

dis m ‎(definite singular disen)

  1. haze

Related terms[edit]

References[edit]


Norwegian Nynorsk[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From German Low German dis

Noun[edit]

dis m ‎(definite singular disen)

  1. haze

Related terms[edit]

References[edit]


Novial[edit]

Determiner[edit]

dis

  1. shortened form of disi

Old French[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Latin decem.

Numeral[edit]

dis

  1. ten
Descendants[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

From the verb dire

Verb[edit]

dis

  1. first-person singular present indicative of dire
  2. second-person singular present indicative of dire
  3. Second-person singular present imperative of dire

Polish[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

dis n ‎(indeclinable)

  1. (music) D sharp

Swedish[edit]

Noun[edit]

dis n ‎(uncountable)

  1. haze; a thin fog
  2. indefinite genitive singular of di

Declension[edit]

Synonyms[edit]

Related terms[edit]


Volapük[edit]

Preposition[edit]

dis

  1. under