dis

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English[edit]

English Wikipedia has articles on:
Wikipedia

Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

Abbreviation of disrespect.

Verb[edit]

dis (third-person singular simple present disses, present participle dissing, simple past and past participle dissed)

  1. (informal) Alternative spelling of diss
Translations[edit]

Noun[edit]

dis (plural disses)

  1. Alternative form of diss
Translations[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

From Old Norse dís.

Noun[edit]

dis (plural disir)

  1. Any of a group of minor female deities in Scandinavian folklore.
    • 1851, Thorpe, Benjamin, Northern Mythology, E Lumley, page 116:
      In Norway the Dîsir appear to have been held in great veneration.
    • 1993, Davidson, Hilda Ellis, The Lost Beliefs of Northern Europe, Routledge, page 113:
      A number of places in Norway and Sweden were also named after the Disir
    • 1997, ‘Egil's Saga’, tr. Bernard Scudder, The Sagas of Icelanders (Penguin 2001, p. 67)
      Bard had prepared a feast for him, because a sacrifice was being made to the disir.

Etymology 3[edit]

Representing a colloquial or dialectal pronunciation of this.

Determiner[edit]

dis

  1. (slang or pronunciation spelling) This.

Pronoun[edit]

dis

  1. (slang or pronunciation spelling) This.

Anagrams[edit]


Afrikaans[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Contraction[edit]

dis

  1. Contraction of dit is (this's, that's, it's)

Cimbrian[edit]

Pronoun[edit]

dis

  1. (Sette Comuni) Alternative form of ditzan

References[edit]

  • “dis” in Martalar, Umberto Martello; Bellotto, Alfonso (1974) Dizionario della lingua Cimbra dei Sette Communi vicentini, 1st edition, Roana, Italy: Instituto di Cultura Cimbra A. Dal Pozzo

Danish[edit]

Verb[edit]

dis

  1. imperative of disse

Dutch[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Middle Dutch disch, from Old Dutch disk, from Proto-Germanic *diskuz (table; dish; bowl), from Latin discus. Cognate with English dish and German Tisch (table).

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /dɪs/
  • (file)
  • Hyphenation: dis
  • Rhymes: -ɪs
  • Homophone: diss

Noun[edit]

dis m (plural dissen, diminutive disje n)

  1. (dated) table
    Synonyms: tafel, berd
  2. (rare) meal, dish

Derived terms[edit]


Finnish[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

dis

  1. (music) D-sharp

Declension[edit]

Inflection of dis (Kotus type 5/risti, no gradation)
nominative dis disit
genitive disin disien
partitive disiä disejä
illative disiin diseihin
singular plural
nominative dis disit
accusative nom. dis disit
gen. disin
genitive disin disien
partitive disiä disejä
inessive disissä diseissä
elative disistä diseistä
illative disiin diseihin
adessive disillä diseillä
ablative disiltä diseiltä
allative disille diseille
essive disinä diseinä
translative disiksi diseiksi
instructive disein
abessive disittä diseittä
comitative diseineen

French[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Verb[edit]

dis

  1. first-person singular present indicative of dire
  2. second-person singular present indicative of dire
  3. first-person singular past historic of dire
  4. second-person singular past historic of dire
  5. second-person singular imperative of dire

Galician[edit]

Verb[edit]

dis

  1. second-person singular present indicative of dicir

German[edit]

Pronoun[edit]

dis

  1. Obsolete spelling of dies

Haitian Creole[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From French dix.

Numeral[edit]

dis

  1. (cardinal) ten

Ladin[edit]

Noun[edit]

dis

  1. plural of

Latin[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

Contracted form of dīves.

Adjective[edit]

dīs (genitive dītis); third declension

  1. rich, wealthy
    Apud Helvetios longe nobilissimus fuit et ditissimus Orgetorix.
    By far the noblest and wealthiest man among the Helvetii was Orgetorix. — Caesar, The Gallic War, I.ii
Inflection[edit]

Third declension.

Number Singular Plural
Case / Gender Masc./Fem. Neuter Masc./Fem. Neuter
Nominative dīs dīs dītēs dītia
Genitive dītis dītis dītium dītium
Dative dītī dītī dītibus dītibus
Accusative dītem dīs dītēs dītia
Ablative dītī dītī dītibus dītibus
Vocative dīs dīs dītēs dītia

Etymology 2[edit]

Inflected form of deus (god).

Noun[edit]

dīs

  1. dative plural of deus
  2. ablative plural of deus

References[edit]

  • dis in Charlton T. Lewis and Charles Short (1879) A Latin Dictionary, Oxford: Clarendon Press
  • dis in Charlton T. Lewis (1891) An Elementary Latin Dictionary, New York: Harper & Brothers
  • dis in Charles du Fresne du Cange’s Glossarium Mediæ et Infimæ Latinitatis (augmented edition, 1883–1887)
  • Carl Meissner; Henry William Auden (1894) Latin Phrase-Book[1], London: Macmillan and Co.
    • (ambiguous) to give thanks to heaven: grates agere (dis immortalibus)
    • (ambiguous) to thank, glorify the immortal gods: grates, laudes agere dis immortalibus
    • (ambiguous) with the help of the gods: dis bene iuvantibus (Fam. 7. 20. 2)
    • (ambiguous) to sacrifice: rem divinam facere (dis)
  • dis in William Smith, editor (1848) A Dictionary of Greek Biography and Mythology, London: John Murray

Louisiana Creole French[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From French dix (ten).

Numeral[edit]

dis

  1. (cardinal) ten

Mauritian Creole[edit]

Mauritian Creole cardinal numbers
 <  9 10 11  > 
    Cardinal : dis
    Ordinal : diziem

Etymology[edit]

From French dix.

Numeral[edit]

dis

  1. (cardinal) ten

Nigerian Pidgin[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From English this.

Determiner[edit]

dis

  1. this

Norman[edit]

Verb[edit]

dis

  1. first-person singular preterite of dithe

Northern Sami[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

  • (Kautokeino) IPA(key): /ˈtiːs/

Pronoun[edit]

dīs

  1. locative of dii

Norwegian Bokmål[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From German Low German dis

Noun[edit]

dis m (definite singular disen)

  1. haze

Related terms[edit]

References[edit]


Norwegian Nynorsk[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From German Low German dis

Noun[edit]

dis m (definite singular disen)

  1. haze

Related terms[edit]

References[edit]


Novial[edit]

Determiner[edit]

dis

  1. shortened form of disi

Old French[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Latin decem.

Pronunciation[edit]

Numeral[edit]

cardinal number
10 Previous: nuef
Next: onze

dis

  1. ten
Descendants[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

From the verb dire

Verb[edit]

dis

  1. first-person singular present indicative of dire
  2. second-person singular present indicative of dire
  3. Second-person singular present imperative of dire

Polish[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

dis n (indeclinable)

  1. (music) D sharp

Swedish[edit]

Noun[edit]

dis n (uncountable)

  1. haze; a thin fog
  2. indefinite genitive singular of di

Declension[edit]

Declension of dis 
Uncountable
Indefinite Definite
Nominative dis diset
Genitive dis disets

Synonyms[edit]

Related terms[edit]


Tok Pisin[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From English dish.

Noun[edit]

dis

  1. dish; bowl

Volapük[edit]

Preposition[edit]

dis

  1. under