apud

Definition from Wiktionary, the free dictionary
Jump to: navigation, search

English[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin apud (at, by, in the presence of, in the writings of).

Preposition[edit]

apud

  1. Used in scholarly works to cite a reference at second hand
    Jones apud Smith means that the original source is Jones, but that the author is relying on Smith for that reference.

Translations[edit]

Anagrams[edit]


Esperanto[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Borrowed from Latin apud.

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /ˈapud/
  • Hyphenation: a‧pud

Preposition[edit]

apud

  1. near
    • 1910, L. L. Zamenhof, "Proverbaro Esperanta":
      Apud propra domo ŝtelisto ne ŝtelas.
      A thief doesn't steal near their own house.
  2. next to, beside, alongside, adjacent to
    • 1910, L. L. Zamenhof, "Proverbaro Esperanta":
      Apud plena manĝotablo ĉiu estas tre afabla.
      Next to a full table of food, everyone is very friendly.

Derived terms[edit]

See also[edit]

  • cis (on this side of)
  • trans (across, on the other side of)

Ido[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Esperanto apud, from Latin apud.

Preposition[edit]

apud

  1. next to, beside, by, immediate vicinity
    La glaso es apud la krucho.
    The glass is next to the picher.

Derived terms[edit]

  • apuda (adjacent, near, neighboring)
  • apude (adjacently)

Synonyms[edit]

  • an (at, on (indicates contiguity, juxtaposition))
  • che (at, in, to)

Antonyms[edit]

  • for (far from, away from)

Interlingua[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Preposition[edit]

apud

  1. next to; together with

Latin[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Connected with Sanskrit अपि (ápi), Ancient Greek ἐπί (epí), and Latin ad, old form ar, thus its strict meaning would be "on to", "unto". Confer Latin ob.

Pronunciation[edit]

Preposition[edit]

apud (+accusative)

  1. at, by, near, among
  2. chez (at the house of)
  3. before, in the presence of, in the writings of, in view of
    • Pliny the Elder
      Libros...natos apud me..
      [These] books [that] I have completed (completed in the writings of myself).

Descendants[edit]

References[edit]

  • apud in Charlton T. Lewis and Charles Short (1879) A Latin Dictionary, Oxford: Clarendon Press
  • apud in Charlton T. Lewis (1891) An Elementary Latin Dictionary, New York: Harper & Brothers
  • du Cange, Charles (1883), “apud”, in G. A. Louis Henschel, Pierre Carpentier, Léopold Favre, editors, Glossarium Mediæ et Infimæ Latinitatis (in Latin), Niort: L. Favre
  • apud” in Félix Gaffiot’s Dictionnaire Illustré Latin-Français, Hachette (1934)
  • Carl Meissner; Henry William Auden (1894) Latin Phrase-Book[1], London: Macmillan and Co.
    • to be popular with; to stand well with a person: gratiosum esse alicui or apud aliquem
    • to be popular with; to stand well with a person: in gratia esse apud aliquem
    • to be highly favoured by; to be influential with..: multum valere gratia apud aliquem
    • to gain a person's esteem, friendship: gratiam inire ab aliquoor apud aliquem
    • to have great influence with a person; to have considerable weight: multum auctoritate valere, posse apud aliquem
    • to have great influence with a person; to have considerable weight: magna auctoritas alicuius est apud aliquem
    • to have great influence with a person; to have considerable weight: alicuius auctoritas multum valet apud aliquem
    • to be honoured, esteemed by some one: esse in honore apud aliquem
    • the matter speaks for itself: res ipsa (pro me apud te) loquitur
    • we read in history: apud rerum scriptores scriptum videmus, scriptum est
    • in Sophocles' Ajax: in Sophoclis (not Sophoclea) Aiace or apud Sophoclem in Aiace
    • to address a meeting of the people: verba facere apud populum, in contione
    • to introduce a person (into a dialogue) discoursing on..: aliquem disputantem facere, inducere, fingere (est aliquid apud aliquem disputans)
    • to speak on a subject: verba facere (de aliqua re, apud aliquem)
    • we have no expression for that: huic rei deest apud nos vocabulum
    • we read in Plato: apud Platonem scriptum videmus, scriptum est or simply est
    • to lose one's head, be beside oneself: non esse apud se (Plaut. Mil. 4. 8. 26)
    • to be hated by some one: in odio esse apud aliquem
    • to hurt some one's feelings: offendere apud aliquem (Cluent. 23. 63)
    • to be in the lower world: apud inferos esse
    • I felt quite at home in his house: apud eum sic fui tamquam domi meae (Fam. 13. 69)
    • to be at some one's house: apud aliquem esse
    • to live in some one's house: habitare in domo alicuius, apud aliquem (Acad. 2. 36. 115)
    • to stop with a person, be his guest for a short time when travelling: deversari apud aliquem (Att. 6. 1. 25)
    • to gain some one's favour: gratiam inire apud aliquem, ab aliquo (cf. sect. V. 12)
    • to conduct a person's case (said of an agent, solicitor): causam alicuius agere (apud iudicem)
    • to accuse, denounce a person: nomen alicuius deferre (apud praetorem) (Verr. 2. 38. 94)
    • to harangue the soldiers: contionari apud milites (B. C. 1. 7)
    • to harangue the soldiers: contionem habere apud milites
  • apud in Ramminger, Johann (accessed 16 July 2016) Neulateinische Wortliste: Ein Wörterbuch des Lateinischen von Petrarca bis 1700[2], pre-publication website, 2005-2016

Portuguese[edit]

Preposition[edit]

apud

  1. apud (introduces an indirect citation)