trans

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See also: trans., trans-, and trans*

English[edit]

English Wikipedia has articles on:
Wikipedia

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /tɹænz/
  • (file)
  • Rhymes: -ænz

Etymology 1[edit]

Borrowed from Latin trāns (on the other side of).

Adjective[edit]

trans (not comparable)

  1. (chemistry) In (or constituting, forming, or describing) a double bond in which the greater radical on both ends is on the opposite side of the bond.
    • 1973, Kert F. Ivie, The Effect of Peroxidase on Model Systems of Lipoxidase and Linoleic Acid
      A series of one electron shifts in this complex establish a new trans double bond at carbon ll which transfers the hydrogen to oxygen, forming the hydroperoxide and liberating the enzyme.
    • 2015, William P Edwards, The Science of Bakery Products, Royal Society of Chemistry (→ISBN), page 26:
      A cis double bond is one where the hydrogen atoms are both on the same side. In contrast, a trans double bond has them on the opposite side.
  2. (chemistry) In (or constituting, forming, or describing) a coordination compound in which the two instances of a particular ligand are on opposite sides of the central atom.
    The trans effect is the labilization of ligands which are trans to certain other ligands.
  3. (cytology) Of the side of the Golgi apparatus farther from the endoplasmic reticulum.
Usage notes[edit]

Compare trans- and its usage notes.

Antonyms[edit]
Derived terms[edit]

Verb[edit]

trans (third-person singular simple present transes, present participle transing, simple past and past participle transed)

  1. (rare, transitive, social sciences) To cross from one side to another of (gender, sex or something in that vein).
    • 2012, Trystan Cotten, Transgender Migrations: The Bodies, Borders, and Politics of Transition (→ISBN):
      [] as they interact with bodies transing gender (and other) borders and spaces.
    • 2012, Finn Enke, Transfeminist Perspectives in and beyond Transgender and Gender Studies (→ISBN), pages 4 and 20:
      Although they did so in sometimes very different ways and in different communities, transsexuals, drag queens, butch lesbians, cross-dressers, feminine men, and masculine women all in some senses crossed, or transed, gender[.] [] People who trans gender as well as people who do not may receive cis-privileges, and people who do not intentionally trans gender as well as people who do are denied cis-privileges if they fail to pass (or pass enough) in the sex/gender they are expected to be.

Etymology 2[edit]

Clipping of transgender or of transsexual (ultimately from Latin trāns).

Adjective[edit]

trans (not comparable)

  1. Transgender (or sometimes transsexual).
    trans rights are human rights
    • 2018, Shon Faye, The Guardian, 30 May:
      Last week, a study released in Belgium suggested that trans people’s brains – including those of trans children – more closely matched those belonging to other members of the gender they identified with than with members of the gender associated with their sex at birth.
  2. Alternative form of trans*
Usage notes[edit]

Compare trans- and its usage notes; see also trans*.

Derived terms[edit]
Related terms[edit]
Translations[edit]
See also[edit]

Noun[edit]

trans (plural transes)

  1. (informal, sometimes offensive, sometimes humorous) A trans person.
    • 2001 November 23, "D a#344", TS out and proud compensation for passabilty?, alt.support.srs, Usenet:
      Good thing about Thanksgiving with the transes is you don;t need to explain your need to dialate in the middle of a movie. ; ) Dana a#344.

Etymology 3[edit]

Clipping.

Noun[edit]

trans

  1. Clipping of transaction.
  2. Clipping of transmission.
    • 1998 May 14, Gary S. Callison, Trans change (was: Something I just deleted and forgot), alt.fan.cecil-adams, Usenet:
      Most of the transes I've seen die started out by losing a gear, usually the high one. If this happens to you, first check the trans fluid level, *then* panic.
    • 2005 September 13, Richard, Re: Valvoline Transmission Fluid ATF+3 Chrysler Approved?, rec.autos.makers.chrysler, Usenet, quoting another user:
      If there really had been a difference and the transes were so forgiving as to be able to tolerate it, then cheaper alternatives like Lubeguard and []

Etymology 4[edit]

Inflection.

Noun[edit]

trans

  1. plural of tran

References[edit]

  • trans at OneLook Dictionary Search
  • trans in Keywords for Today: A 21st Century Vocabulary, edited by The Keywords Project, Colin MacCabe, Holly Yanacek, 2018.
  • trans in The Century Dictionary, New York, N.Y.: The Century Co., 1911.

Anagrams[edit]


Esperanto[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Derived from Latin trāns (across, beyond), from Proto-Indo-European *terh₂- (through, throughout, over). Doublet of tra.

Pronunciation[edit]

Preposition[edit]

trans

  1. across, on the other side of
  2. over

Antonyms[edit]

  • cis (on this side of)
  • maltrans (on this side of)

See also[edit]


Finnish[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Learned borrowing from English trans, a clipping of English transgender.

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /ˈtrɑns/, [ˈt̪rɑns̠]
  • Rhymes: -ɑns
  • Syllabification: trans

Adjective[edit]

trans (not comparable)

  1. trans, transgender
    Synonyms: transsukupuolinen, (dated) transseksuaalinen

Usage notes[edit]

The adjective is mostly used predicatively. When an attribute, it is usually prefixed, so that *trans mies becomes transmies (transman).

Declension[edit]

Indeclinable.

French[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

Borrowed from Latin trans. Doublet of très.

Adjective[edit]

trans (invariable)

  1. (chemistry) trans

Related terms[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

Noun[edit]

trans m or f (plural trans)

  1. transsexual

Adjective[edit]

trans (invariable)

  1. transsexual

Further reading[edit]


Ido[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Esperanto trans, from Latin trans. Not to be confused with the paronym tra.

Preposition[edit]

trans

  1. on the other side of, beyond, across
    Il pasas trans la rivero per ponto.
    He goes across the river by bridge.

Derived terms[edit]

Synonyms[edit]

  • dop (behind, after)

Antonyms[edit]

  • cis (on this side of)

Paronyms[edit]

  • tra (through)

Interlingua[edit]

Preposition[edit]

trans

  1. across

Italian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

See English trans.

Noun[edit]

trans m or f (invariable)

  1. transsexual

Latin[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Italic *trānts, from Proto-Indo-European *tr̥h₂-n̥ts, from *terh₂- (through, throughout, over). Cognate with English through, Scots throch (through), West Frisian troch (through), Dutch door (through), German durch (through), Gothic 𐌸𐌰𐌹𐍂𐌷 (þairh, through), Albanian tërthor (through, around), Welsh tra (through). See also thorough.

Pronunciation[edit]

Preposition[edit]

trāns (+ accusative)

  1. across, beyond

Derived terms[edit]

Descendants[edit]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  • trans in Charlton T. Lewis and Charles Short (1879) A Latin Dictionary, Oxford: Clarendon Press
  • trans in Charlton T. Lewis (1891) An Elementary Latin Dictionary, New York: Harper & Brothers
  • trans in Gaffiot, Félix (1934) Dictionnaire illustré Latin-Français, Hachette
  • trans in Ramminger, Johann (accessed 16 July 2016) Neulateinische Wortliste: Ein Wörterbuch des Lateinischen von Petrarca bis 1700[1], pre-publication website, 2005-2016

Middle English[edit]

Noun[edit]

trans

  1. Alternative form of traunce

Polish[edit]

Polish Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia pl

Etymology[edit]

From French transe.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

trans m inan

  1. trance (dazed or unconscious condition)
  2. trance (state of low response to stimulus and diminished, narrow attention)
  3. (psychology) trance (such a state induced by hypnosis)

Declension[edit]

Derived terms[edit]

Further reading[edit]

  • trans in Wielki słownik języka polskiego, Instytut Języka Polskiego PAN
  • trans in Polish dictionaries at PWN

Portuguese[edit]

Adjective[edit]

trans (plural trans, comparable)

  1. Short for transexual.
  2. Short for transgênero.

Noun[edit]

trans m, f (plural trans)

  1. Short for transexual.
  2. Short for transgênero.

Spanish[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Clipping of transexual.

Adjective[edit]

trans (invariable)

  1. transgender, trans
    • 2015 July 30, Karla Avelar, ““Tengo miedo constantemente””, in El País (Spain)[2]:
      Internacionalmente, presentan al país como perfecto cumplidor en cuanto a la protección de los derechos humanos de la población LGBTI. Hablan de la recientemente creada línea de atención y de la contratación de mujeres trans en organismos públicos.
      Internationally, they present the country as a perfect complier regarding the protection of the LGBTI population's human rights. They talk about the recently created support line and the hiring of trans women in public organizations.
    • 2019 September 4, Claudio Andrade, “Es abogada y quiere convertirse en la primera jueza trans de la Argentina”, in Clarín (Argentina)[3]:
      En la Argentina solo existe un antecedente de una persona trans que haya aspirado a un cargo de juez.
      In Argentine only one precedent exists of a trans person who has aspired to the position of judge.

Derived terms[edit]


Swedish[edit]

Noun[edit]

trans c

  1. trance

Anagrams[edit]