trance

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See also: Trance and trancé

English[edit]

English Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia

Etymology 1[edit]

From Middle English traunce, from Anglo-Norman transe (fear of coming evil; passage from life to death), from transir (to be numb with fear; to die, pass on), from Latin trānseō (to cross over).

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

trance (countable and uncountable, plural trances)

  1. (countable) A dazed or unconscious condition.
  2. (countable) A state of awareness, concentration, or focus that filters experience and information (for example, a state of meditation or possession by some being).
  3. (countable, psychology) A state of low response to stimulus and diminished, narrow attention; particularly one induced by hypnosis.
  4. (uncountable, music) Short for trance music (genre of electronic dance music).
Alternative forms[edit]
Derived terms[edit]
Descendants[edit]
  • French: trance
Translations[edit]
The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables, removing any numbers. Numbers do not necessarily match those in definitions. See instructions at Wiktionary:Entry layout § Translations.

Verb[edit]

trance (third-person singular simple present trances, present participle trancing, simple past and past participle tranced)

  1. (transitive, intransitive) To (cause to) be in a trance; to entrance.
  2. (transitive, rare) To create in or via a trance.
    • 2014, Geoffrey Benjamin, Temiar Religion, 1964-2012, page 64:
      The Horned Toad (kɛŋkak) tranced the rivers into being. A bakɔh bird tranced the mountains. The Scrub Bulbul (ˀɛsˀããs) drilled fire into existence with its beak. And, finally, the Bronzed Black Drongo (tɛrhɛɛh) tranced the year []
    • 1995, Sue Jennings, Kevin Jennings, Theatre, Ritual, and Transformation: The Senoi Temiars, page 111:
      What is interesting for us here is that Chingkai and her familiars dreamed and tranced the Temiar world into being. []

Etymology 2[edit]

The verb is derived from Middle English traunce, trauncen, trancen (to move about (?); to prance (?); to trample the ground) (whence modern English trounce with the same senses, which see for more).[1] The noun is probably derived from the verb.

Verb[edit]

trance (third-person singular simple present trances, present participle trancing, simple past and past participle tranced)

  1. (obsolete outside Britain, dialectal, intransitive) To walk heavily or with some difficulty; to tramp, to trudge.
    Synonym: (dialectal) trounce
  2. (obsolete outside Britain, dialectal, intransitive) To pass across or over; to traverse.
    Synonym: (dialectal) trounce
  3. (obsolete outside Britain, dialectal, intransitive) To travel quickly over a long distance.
    Synonym: (dialectal) trounce

Noun[edit]

trance (plural trances)

  1. (obsolete outside Britain, dialectal) A tedious journey.
    Synonym: (dialectal) trounce
    • 1824, Sir Walter Scott, Redgauntlet:
      So saying, he led the way out through halls and trances that were weel kend to my gudesire, and into the auld oak parlour; []

References[edit]

  1. ^ Compare “trance, v.2”, in OED Online Paid subscription required, Oxford, Oxfordshire: Oxford University Press, 1914; “trounce, v.2”, in OED Online Paid subscription required, Oxford, Oxfordshire: Oxford University Press, 1915.

Part or all of this entry has been imported from the 1913 edition of Webster’s Dictionary, which is now free of copyright and hence in the public domain. The imported definitions may be significantly out of date, and any more recent senses may be completely missing.
(See the entry for trance in
Webster’s Revised Unabridged Dictionary, G. & C. Merriam, 1913.)

Anagrams[edit]


Finnish[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Borrowed from English trance.

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /ˈtræns/, [ˈt̪ræns̠]
  • IPA(key): /ˈtrɑnse/, [ˈt̪rɑns̠e̞]

Noun[edit]

trance

  1. trance (genre of electronic dance music)

Declension[edit]

Inflection of trance (Kotus type 8/nalle, no gradation)
nominative trance trancet
genitive trancen trancejen
partitive trancea tranceja
illative tranceen tranceihin
singular plural
nominative trance trancet
accusative nom. trance trancet
gen. trancen
genitive trancen trancejen
tranceinrare
partitive trancea tranceja
inessive trancessa tranceissa
elative trancesta tranceista
illative tranceen tranceihin
adessive trancella tranceilla
ablative trancelta tranceilta
allative trancelle tranceille
essive trancena tranceina
translative tranceksi tranceiksi
instructive trancein
abessive trancetta tranceitta
comitative tranceineen
Possessive forms of trance (type nalle)
possessor singular plural
1st person tranceni trancemme
2nd person trancesi trancenne
3rd person trancensa

French[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Borrowed from English trance.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

trance f (uncountable)

  1. trance (music genre)

Anagrams[edit]


Italian[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

Borrowed from English trance.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

trance f (invariable)

  1. trance (music genre)

Etymology 2[edit]

See the etymology of the corresponding lemma form.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

trance

  1. plural of trancia

References[edit]

  1. ^ trance in Luciano Canepari, Dizionario di Pronuncia Italiana (DiPI)

Anagrams[edit]


Middle English[edit]

Noun[edit]

trance

  1. Alternative form of traunce

Norwegian Bokmål[edit]

Noun[edit]

trance m (definite singular trancen, indefinite plural trancer, definite plural trancene)

  1. form removed by a 1984 spelling decision; superseded by transe

Norwegian Nynorsk[edit]

Noun[edit]

trance m (definite singular trancen, indefinite plural trancar, definite plural trancane)

  1. form removed by a 1984 spelling decision; superseded by transe

Polish[edit]

Polish Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia pl

Etymology[edit]

Borrowed from English trance.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

trance m inan

  1. trance music

Declension[edit]

References[edit]

  • Wielki słownik wyrazów obcych, M. Bańko, PWN 2003, →ISBN

Portuguese[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

Borrowed from English trance.

Noun[edit]

trance m (uncountable)

  1. (music) trance (a genre of electronic dance music)

Etymology 2[edit]

Verb[edit]

trance

  1. first-person singular (eu) present subjunctive of trançar
  2. third-person singular (ele and ela, also used with você and others) present subjunctive of trançar
  3. third-person singular (você) affirmative imperative of trançar
  4. third-person singular (você) negative imperative of trançar

Etymology 3[edit]

Noun[edit]

trance m (plural trances)

  1. Obsolete form of transe.



Spanish[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Borrowed from English trance.

Noun[edit]

trance m (plural trances)

  1. trance

Derived terms[edit]

Further reading[edit]