stimulus

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See also: Stimulus

English[edit]

Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia

Etymology[edit]

From Latin stimulus (goad, prick)

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

stimulus (plural stimuli)

  1. (Can we clean up(+) this sense?) Anything that may have an impact or influence on a system.
    an economic stimulus
    • 2012 November 7, Matt Bai, “Winning a Second Term, Obama Will Confront Familiar Headwinds”, in New York Times[1]:
      Democrats, meanwhile, point out that Republicans seem to have made a conscious decision, beginning with the stimulus, to oppose anything the president put forward, dooming any chance of renewed cooperation between the parties.
  2. (Can we clean up(+) this sense?) (physiology) Something external that elicits or influences a physiological or psychological activity or response.
  3. (Can we clean up(+) this sense?) (psychology) Anything effectively impinging upon any of the sensory apparatuses of a living organism, including physical phenomena both internal and external to the body.
  4. (Can we clean up(+) this sense?) Anything that induces a person to take action.

Synonyms[edit]

Translations[edit]

The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables, removing any numbers. Numbers do not necessarily match those in definitions. See instructions at Wiktionary:Entry layout#Translations.

Esperanto[edit]

Verb[edit]

stimulus

  1. conditional of stimuli

French[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Borrowing from Latin stimulus.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

stimulus m (plural stimulus or stimuli)

  1. stimulus

Further reading[edit]


Latin[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Indo-European *steyǵ- (to pierce, prick, be sharp). Cognate with Ancient Greek στίζω (stízō, I mark).

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

stimulus m (genitive stimulī); second declension

  1. A goad, prick
  2. A sting
  3. (figuratively) stimulus, incentive

Inflection[edit]

Second declension.

Case Singular Plural
nominative stimulus stimulī
genitive stimulī stimulōrum
dative stimulō stimulīs
accusative stimulum stimulōs
ablative stimulō stimulīs
vocative stimule stimulī

Related terms[edit]

Descendants[edit]

References[edit]

  • stimulus in Charlton T. Lewis and Charles Short (1879) A Latin Dictionary, Oxford: Clarendon Press
  • stimulus in Charlton T. Lewis (1891) An Elementary Latin Dictionary, New York: Harper & Brothers
  • du Cange, Charles (1883), “stimulus”, in G. A. Louis Henschel, Pierre Carpentier, Léopold Favre, editors, Glossarium Mediæ et Infimæ Latinitatis (in Latin), Niort: L. Favre
  • stimulus” in Félix Gaffiot’s Dictionnaire Illustré Latin-Français, Hachette (1934)
  • Carl Meissner; Henry William Auden (1894) Latin Phrase-Book[2], London: Macmillan and Co.
    • to be spurred on by ambition: stimulis gloriae concitari
    • to spur, urge a person on: calcaria alicui adhibere, admovere; stimulos alicui admovere
  • stimulus in Harry Thurston Peck, editor (1898) Harper's Dictionary of Classical Antiquities, New York: Harper & Brothers

Norwegian Bokmål[edit]

Norwegian Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia no

Etymology[edit]

Probably from Latin

Noun[edit]

stimulus m (definite singular stimulusen, indefinite plural stimuli, definite plural stimuliene)

  1. a stimulus

Related terms[edit]

References[edit]


Norwegian Nynorsk[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Probably from Latin

Noun[edit]

stimulus m (definite singular stimulusen, indefinite plural stimuli or stimulusar, definite plural stimuliane or stimulusane)

  1. a stimulus

References[edit]