calcar

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See also: calçar

English[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From the Italian calcara (lime-kiln).

Noun[edit]

calcar (plural calcars)

  1. A small oven or furnace, used for the calcination of sand and potash, and converting them into frit.
Related terms[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

From the Latin calcar (spur).

Noun[edit]

calcar (plural calcars)

  1. (botany, anatomy) A spur-like projection.
Derived terms[edit]
Related terms[edit]

Asturian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin calcāre, present active infinitive of calcō.

Verb[edit]

calcar (first-person singular indicative present calco, past participle calcáu)

  1. to press, push
  2. to hit, strike

Conjugation[edit]


Galician[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin calcāre (to press), present active infinitive of calcō.

Pronunciation[edit]

Verb[edit]

calcar (first-person singular present calco, first-person singular preterite calquei, past participle calcado)

  1. to press
  2. to trample

Conjugation[edit]

Derived terms[edit]

Related terms[edit]

References[edit]

  • calc” in Xavier Varela Barreiro & Xavier Gómez Guinovart: Corpus Xelmírez - Corpus lingüístico da Galicia medieval. SLI / Grupo TALG / ILG, 2006-2016.
  • calcar” in Dicionario de Dicionarios da lingua galega, SLI - ILGA 2006-2013.
  • calcar” in Tesouro informatizado da lingua galega. Santiago: ILG.
  • calcar” in Álvarez, Rosario (coord.): Tesouro do léxico patrimonial galego e portugués, Santiago de Compostela: Instituto da Lingua Galega.

Latin[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Possibly from an extension of the Proto-Indo-European *(s)kel- (heel). Cognate of calx, calcō.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

calcar n (genitive calcāris); third declension

  1. spur (equestrian, or of a cock)
  2. (figuratively) incitement, stimulus

Declension[edit]

Third declension neuter “pure” i-stem.

Case Singular Plural
Nominative calcar calcāria
Genitive calcāris calcārium
Dative calcārī calcāribus
Accusative calcar calcāria
Ablative calcārī calcāribus
Vocative calcar calcāria

Descendants[edit]

References[edit]

  • calcar in Charlton T. Lewis and Charles Short (1879) A Latin Dictionary, Oxford: Clarendon Press
  • calcar in Charlton T. Lewis (1891) An Elementary Latin Dictionary, New York: Harper & Brothers
  • calcar in Gaffiot, Félix (1934) Dictionnaire Illustré Latin-Français, Hachette
  • Carl Meissner; Henry William Auden (1894) Latin Phrase-Book[1], London: Macmillan and Co.
    • to put spurs to a horse: calcaribus equum concitare
  • calcar in Harry Thurston Peck, editor (1898) Harper's Dictionary of Classical Antiquities, New York: Harper & Brothers
  • calcar in William Smith et al., editor (1890) A Dictionary of Greek and Roman Antiquities, London: William Wayte. G. E. Marindin
  • New Latin Grammar, Allen and Greenough, 1903.

Portuguese[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin calcāre, present active infinitive of calcō.

Pronunciation[edit]

Verb[edit]

calcar (first-person singular present indicative calco, past participle calcado)

  1. to trample, to crush
  2. to press (grapes, etc.)
  3. (figuratively) to humiliate, to subjugate
  4. (transitive) to base a work on (a previous one)
  5. (transitive) to copy a work

Usage notes[edit]

Conjugation[edit]

Related terms[edit]

Noun[edit]

calcar m (plural calcares)

  1. (botany) spur
  2. (zoology) in arthropods, a mobile process similar to a spike
  3. (zoology) in certain insects, the strongest spur located in the tibia

Spanish[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Latin calcāre, present active infinitive of calcō.

Verb[edit]

calcar (first-person singular present calco, first-person singular preterite calqué, past participle calcado)

  1. to trace, copy (copy by means of carbon paper or tracing paper)
  2. to trample
Conjugation[edit]
  • c becomes qu before e.
Related terms[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

Noun[edit]

calcar m (plural calcares)

  1. (anatomy, botany) calcar (a spur-like projection)
Derived terms[edit]

Further reading[edit]