trample

Definition from Wiktionary, the free dictionary
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English[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Middle English trample, from tramp +‎ -le (frequentative).

Attested in the original sense 'walk heavily' since early 14th century.

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /ˈtɹæmpəl/
    • (file)
  • Rhymes: -æmpəl

Verb[edit]

trample (third-person singular simple present tramples, present participle trampling, simple past and past participle trampled)

  1. (transitive) To crush something by walking on it.
    to trample grass or flowers
    • Neither cast ye your pearls before swine, lest they trample them under their feet.
    • 1963, Margery Allingham, “Foreword”, in The China Governess[1]:
      Everything a living animal could do to destroy and to desecrate bed and walls had been done. […]  A canister of flour from the kitchen had been thrown at the looking-glass and lay like trampled snow over the remains of a decent blue suit with the lining ripped out which lay on top of the ruin of a plastic wardrobe.
  2. (by extension) To treat someone harshly.
  3. (intransitive) To walk heavily and destructively.
    • June 9, 1960, Charles Dickens, All the Year Round
      [] horses proud of the crimson and yellow shaving-brushes on their heads, and of the sharp tingling bells upon their harness that chime far along the glaring white road along which they trample []
  4. (by extension) To cause emotional injury as if by trampling.
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Cowper to this entry?)

Translations[edit]

The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables, removing any numbers. Numbers do not necessarily match those in definitions. See instructions at Wiktionary:Entry layout § Translations.

Noun[edit]

trample (plural tramples)

  1. A heavy stepping.
    • 2015, Lucy Corne, Josephine Quintero, Lonely Planet Canary Islands
      Newly harvested grapes are poured into a vast vat for everyone to have a good trample upon []
  2. The sound of heavy footsteps.

Translations[edit]

Anagrams[edit]


German[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Verb[edit]

trample

  1. inflection of trampeln:
    1. first-person singular present
    2. singular imperative
    3. first/third-person singular subjunctive I

Hunsrik[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Middle High German *trampen, itself borrowed from Middle Low German trampen, from Old Saxon *trampan, from Proto-West Germanic *trampan (to step).

Pronunciation[edit]

Verb[edit]

trample

  1. to tread
  2. to trample

Further reading[edit]