subjugate

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English[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Romans Under the Yoke (1858), Charles Gleyre

From Latin subiugatus, past participle of subiugare (to bring under the yoke, subjugate), from sub (under) + iugum (yoke). See yoke.

Pronunciation[edit]

  • (verb)
    • (UK) IPA(key): /ˈsʌbdʒuɡeɪt/, /ˈsʌbdʒəɡeɪt/
    • (US) IPA(key): /ˈsʌbdʒəɡeɪt/
  • (file)
  • (adjective)
    • (UK) IPA(key): /ˈsʌbdʒuɡət/, /ˈsʌbdʒəɡət/
    • (US) IPA(key): /ˈsʌbdʒəɡət/
  • Hyphenation: sub‧ju‧gate

Verb[edit]

subjugate (third-person singular simple present subjugates, present participle subjugating, simple past and past participle subjugated)

  1. (transitive) To forcibly impose obedience or servitude upon.
    • 1782, William Cowper, “Hope”, in Poems, London: [] J[oseph] Johnson, [], OCLC 1029672464, page 151:
      From infancy through childhood's giddy maze, / Frovvard at ſchool, and fretful in his plays, / The puny tyrant burns to ſubjugate / The free republic of the vvhip-gig ſtate.

Synonyms[edit]

Related terms[edit]

Translations[edit]

Adjective[edit]

subjugate (not comparable)

  1. In a subjugated position.
    • 2010, James M. Volo, A History of War Resistance in America (page 17)
      Each nationalist struggle assumed the complexion of a Communist versus non-Communist conflict rather than one between a colonial imperium and a subjugate indigenous population intent on their independence.

Further reading[edit]


Latin[edit]

Verb[edit]

subjugāte

  1. second-person plural present active imperative of subjugō