induce

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English[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Middle English enducen, borrowed from Latin indūcere, present active infinitive of indūcō (lead in, bring in, introduce), from in + dūcō (lead, conduct). Compare also abduce, adduce, conduce, deduce, produce, reduce etc. Doublet of endue.

Pronunciation[edit]

Verb[edit]

induce (third-person singular simple present induces, present participle inducing, simple past and past participle induced)

  1. (transitive) To lead by persuasion or influence; incite or prevail upon.
  2. (transitive) To cause, bring about, lead to.
    His meditation induced a compromise.   Opium induces sleep.
  3. (physics) To cause or produce (electric current or a magnetic state) by a physical process of induction.
  4. (transitive, logic) To infer by induction.
  5. (transitive, obsolete) To lead in, bring in, introduce.
  6. (transitive, obsolete) To draw on, place upon. (Can we add an example for this sense?)

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Anagrams[edit]


Italian[edit]

Verb[edit]

induce

  1. third-person singular present indicative of indurre

Anagrams[edit]


Latin[edit]

Verb[edit]

indūce

  1. second-person singular present active imperative of indūcō

Romanian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Borrowed from Latin indūcere, present active infinitive of indūcō, with senses based off French induire.

Verb[edit]

a induce (third-person singular present induce, past participle indus3rd conj.

  1. to induce, incite, cause or push to do something

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Spanish[edit]

Verb[edit]

induce

  1. Informal second-person singular () affirmative imperative form of inducir.
  2. Formal second-person singular (usted) present indicative form of inducir.
  3. Third-person singular (él, ella, also used with usted?) present indicative form of inducir.