duce

From Wiktionary, the free dictionary
Jump to navigation Jump to search
See also: Duce

English[edit]

English Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia

Etymology[edit]

Borrowed from Italian duce. Doublet of duke.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

duce (usually uncountable, plural duci)

  1. (fascism) an authoritarian leader, especially Benito Mussolini

Translations[edit]

Italian[edit]

Italian Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia it

Etymology[edit]

Borrowed from Latin ducem (leader), from the nomen agentis form of Proto-Indo-European *dewk-, whence also dūcō (to lead). Compare the likewise borrowed doublets duca and doge.

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /ˈdu.t͡ʃe/
  • Rhymes: -utʃe
  • Hyphenation: dù‧ce

Noun[edit]

duce m (plural duci)

  1. (archaic or literary) captain, leader, helm
    Synonyms: capitano, capo, condottiero
  2. (by extension, after the Fascist era) an authoritarian leader
    Synonyms: autocrate, despota, dittatore, oppressore, tiranno

Derived terms[edit]

Related terms[edit]

Latin[edit]

Verb[edit]

dūce

  1. Alternative form of dūc (lead!, guide!), second-person singular present active imperative of dūcō.

Usage notes[edit]

While common in Plautus, dūc is the far more common variant in the classical period.

Noun[edit]

duce

  1. ablative singular of dux

Old English[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From the original meaning of "diver," from Proto-West Germanic *dūkan (to duck, dive).

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /ˈduː.ke/, /ˈdu.ke/

Noun[edit]

dū̆ce f

  1. duck (bird)
    Synonym: ened

Declension[edit]

Descendants[edit]

Romanian[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /ˈdu.t͡ʃe/
  • (file)
  • Rhymes: -ut͡ʃe
  • Hyphenation: du‧ce

Etymology 1[edit]

Inherited from Latin dūcere,[1] present active infinitive of dūcō, from Proto-Italic *doukō, from Proto-Indo-European *déwketi, from the root *dewk-.

Verb[edit]

a duce (third-person singular present duce, past participle dus) 3rd conj.

  1. (transitive) to carry, lead, take
    Trebuie să fie duși copiii la școală.
    The children must be taken to school.
  2. (intransitive) to lead, to go
    Drumul ăsta duce la casa mea.
    This road leads to my house.
  3. (reflexive) to go
    Mă duc acasă.I’m going home.
  4. (reflexive, figuratively) to die
  5. (transitive or intransitive; mildly informal) to withstand, handle, weather, deal with
    O să-ți dau de lucru de să nu poți duce.
    I’ll give you so much to do that you won’t be able to take it.
Usage notes[edit]

The negative imperative is known to always be identical to the infinitive. However, like many of the verbs with a short imperative, duce often does not follow this rule in colloquial usage, keeping the same form as the imperative: Nu (te) duce (prescribed); nu (te) du (common in practice).[2]

The same applies to the derived verbs.

Conjugation[edit]
Derived terms[edit]
Related terms[edit]

See also[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

Modified, to be adapted to the Latin, from the older form ducă, itself from Italian duca, and partly through Byzantine Greek δούκα (doúka), ultimately from Latin dux, ducem.

Alternative forms[edit]

Noun[edit]

duce m (plural duci)

  1. duke
Declension[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ duce in DEX online—Dicționare ale limbii române (Dictionaries of the Romanian language)
  2. ^ Gramatica limbii române [Grammar of the Romanian language], volume 1, Bucharest: Romanian Academy, 2005, →ISBN, page 380