duce

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See also: Duce

Italian[edit]

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Etymology[edit]

Borrowed from Latin dux, ducem (leader), from the nomen agentis form of Proto-Indo-European *dewk-, whence also dūcō (I lead). Compare the likewise borrowed doublets duca and doge.

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /ˈdu.t͡ʃe/
  • Rhymes: -utʃe
  • Hyphenation: dù‧ce

Noun[edit]

duce m (plural duci)

  1. (archaic or literary) captain, leader, helm
    Synonyms: capitano, capo, condottiero
  2. (by extension, after the Fascist era) an authoritarian leader
    Synonyms: autocrate, despota, dittatore, oppressore, tiranno

Derived terms[edit]

Related terms[edit]


Latin[edit]

Verb[edit]

dūce

  1. Alternative form of dūc (lead!, guide!), second-person singular present active imperative of dūcō.

Usage notes[edit]

While common in Plautus, dūc is the far more common variant in the classical period.

Noun[edit]

duce

  1. ablative singular of dux

Old English[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From the original meaning of "diver," from Proto-West Germanic *dūkan (to duck, dive).

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /ˈduː.ke/, /ˈdu.ke/

Noun[edit]

dū̆ce f

  1. duck (bird)

Declension[edit]


Romanian[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): [ˈdu.t͡ʃe]
  • (file)

Etymology 1[edit]

From Latin dūcere, present active infinitive of dūcō, from Proto-Italic *doukō, from Proto-Indo-European *déwketi, from the root *dewk-.

Verb[edit]

a duce (third-person singular present duce, past participle dus3rd conj.

  1. (transitive) to carry, to lead
    a duce de nas
    to lead by the nose
  2. (intransitive) to lead, to go
    Drumul ăsta duce la casa mea.
    this road leads to my house
  3. (reflexive, with accusative) to go
    duc acasă.
    I'm going home.
  4. (reflexive, with accusative; figuratively) to die
Conjugation[edit]
Derived terms[edit]
Related terms[edit]

See also[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

Modified, to be adapted to the Latin, from the older form ducă, itself from Italian duca, and partly through Byzantine Greek δούκα (doúka), ultimately from Latin dux, ducem.

Alternative forms[edit]

Noun[edit]

duce m (plural duci)

  1. duke