longe

Definition from Wiktionary, the free dictionary
Jump to: navigation, search
See also: longé and long e

English[edit]

Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From French allonger (to lengthen), or Latin longa (long).

EB1911 - Volume 01 - Page 001 - 1.svg This entry lacks etymological information. If you are familiar with the origin of this term, please add it to the page per etymology instructions. You can also discuss it at the Etymology scriptorium.
Particularly: “this doesn’t explain much, how did it come from ‘long’ to ‘work a horse’??”

Pronunciation[edit]

Verb[edit]

longe (third-person singular simple present longes, present participle longeing, simple past and past participle longed)

  1. (US) To work a horse in a circle at the end of a long line or rope.

Translations[edit]

Noun[edit]

longe (plural longes)

  1. A long rope or flat web line, more commonly referred to as a longe line, approximately 20-30 feet long, attached to the bridle, longeing cavesson, or halter of a horse and used to control the animal while longeing.
  2. (obsolete) A lunge; a thrust.
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Smollett to this entry?)
  3. The training ground for a horse.
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Farrow to this entry?)

Translations[edit]

References[edit]


Esperanto[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Adverb[edit]

longe

  1. lengthily

Derived terms[edit]


French[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

  • (file)

Verb[edit]

longe

  1. first-person singular present indicative of longer
  2. third-person singular present indicative of longer
  3. first-person singular present subjunctive of longer
  4. first-person singular present subjunctive of longer
  5. second-person singular imperative of longer

Interlingua[edit]

Adjective[edit]

longe (comparative plus longe, superlative le plus longe)

  1. long

Latin[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From longus (far, long) + . Compare English long and Icelandic langt and lengi.

Pronunciation[edit]

Adverb[edit]

longē (comparable longius, superlative longissimē)

  1. (of space) long, a long way off, far, far off, at a distance
    Longe absum.
    I’m far away.
    Longe absum ab ejus crimine.
    I’m far away from my crimes.
  2. (of time) long, for a long period of time
  3. widely, greatly, much, very much

Synonyms[edit]

Derived terms[edit]

Related terms[edit]

Descendants[edit]

Adjective[edit]

longe

  1. vocative masculine singular of longus

References[edit]

  • longe in Charlton T. Lewis and Charles Short (1879) A Latin Dictionary, Oxford: Clarendon Press
  • longe in Charlton T. Lewis (1891) An Elementary Latin Dictionary, New York: Harper & Brothers
  • longe” in Félix Gaffiot’s Dictionnaire Illustré Latin-Français, Hachette (1934)
  • Carl Meissner; Henry William Auden (1894) Latin Phrase-Book[1], London: Macmillan and Co.
    • (ambiguous) to be far from town: longe, procul abesse ab urbe
    • (ambiguous) far and wide; on all sides; everywhere: longe lateque, passim (e.g. fluere)
    • (ambiguous) the case is exactly similar (entirely different): eadem (longe alia) est huius rei ratio
    • (ambiguous) this is quite another matter: hoc longe aliter, secus est
    • (ambiguous) a wide-spread error: error longe lateque diffusus
    • (ambiguous) to be quite uncivilised: ab omni cultu et humanitate longe abesse (B. G. 1. 1. 3)
    • (ambiguous) Pythagoras' principles were widely propagated: Pythagorae doctrina longe lateque fluxit (Tusc. 4. 1. 2)
    • (ambiguous) to go a long way back (in narrative): longe, alte (longius, altius) repetere (either absolute or ab aliqua re)
    • (ambiguous) to foresee political events long before: longe prospicere futuros casus rei publicae (De Amic. 12. 40)

Neapolitan[edit]

Adjective[edit]

longe

  1. feminine plural of luongo

Old English[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Germanic *langaz (long), from Proto-Indo-European *dl̥h₁gʰós (long).

Pronunciation[edit]

Adjective[edit]

longe

  1. long

This entry needs an inflection-table template.

Adverb[edit]

longe

  1. long

Portuguese[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old Portuguese longe, from Latin longe.

Pronunciation[edit]

Adverb[edit]

longe (comparative mais longe superlative o mais longe)

  1. far, a long way

Antonyms[edit]