pauper

Definition from Wiktionary, the free dictionary
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English[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Learned borrowing from Latin pauper (poor). Originally a legal term.[1] Doublet of poor.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

pauper (plural paupers)

  1. One who is extremely poor.
    Synonyms: see Thesaurus:pauper
  2. One living on or eligible for public charity.

Derived terms[edit]

Related terms[edit]

Translations[edit]

The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables, removing any numbers. Numbers do not necessarily match those in definitions. See instructions at Wiktionary:Entry layout § Translations.

Verb[edit]

pauper (third-person singular simple present paupers, present participle paupering, simple past and past participle paupered)

  1. (transitive) To make a pauper of; to drive into poverty.
    • 2017, Naomi Rawlings, Love's Christmas Hope
      “There's no sense in you paupering yourself because you're too stubborn to take my money.”

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Douglas Harper (2001–2022), “pauper”, in Online Etymology Dictionary.

Further reading[edit]


Dalmatian[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Learned borrowing from Latin pauper.

Adjective[edit]

pauper

  1. poor

Dutch[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Borrowed from Latin pauper.

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /ˈpɑu̯.pər/
  • Hyphenation: pau‧per

Noun[edit]

pauper m (plural paupers)

  1. (chiefly historical) A pauper.

Derived terms[edit]


Latin[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Italic *pawoparos (a thematic adjective, which was switched to the third declension in Latin analogically), from a compound beginning with Proto-Indo-European *peh₂w- (few, small) (compare English few). The origin of the second element, -per, is less certain, but probably *perh₃- (to grant, bestow, provide) (compare Ancient Greek ἔπορον (époron, to supply, grant, pay)), therefore the compound meant “providing little”.[1]

Pronunciation[edit]

Adjective[edit]

pauper (genitive pauperis, comparative pauperior, superlative pauperrimus); third-declension one-termination adjective (non-i-stem)

  1. poor
    Synonyms: egens, inops, exiguus
    Antonyms: opulentus, dives, dis, ditis, opulens, locuples

Declension[edit]

Third-declension one-termination adjective (non-i-stem).

Number Singular Plural
Case / Gender Masc./Fem. Neuter Masc./Fem. Neuter
Nominative pauper pauperēs paupera
Genitive pauperis pauperum
Dative pauperī pauperibus
Accusative pauperem pauper pauperēs paupera
Ablative paupere pauperibus
Vocative pauper pauperēs paupera
  • In Late or Vulgar Latin, this third declension adjective seems to have been regularized to first/second declension, like in the attested forms pauperus and paupera

Derived terms[edit]

Related terms[edit]

Descendants[edit]

Learned borrowings

References[edit]

  1. ^ De Vaan, Michiel (2008), “pauper”, in Etymological Dictionary of Latin and the other Italic Languages (Leiden Indo-European Etymological Dictionary Series; 7), Leiden, Boston: Brill, →ISBN, page 451: “PIt. *pau(o)-pa/oro-; PIE *peh₂u-(o-)p(o)rh₃-o-”

Further reading[edit]


Middle English[edit]

Noun[edit]

pauper

  1. Alternative form of paper

Romanian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin pauper.

Adjective[edit]

pauper m or n (feminine singular pauperă, masculine plural pauperi, feminine and neuter plural paupere)

  1. poor

Declension[edit]