pauper

Definition from Wiktionary, the free dictionary
Jump to navigation Jump to search

English[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Borrowed from Latin pauper (poor)[1] (whence also poor), ultimately from Proto-Indo-European *peh₂w- (few, small) (English few).

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

pauper (plural paupers)

  1. One who is extremely poor.
  2. One living on or eligible for public charity.

Synonyms[edit]

Related terms[edit]

Related terms[edit]

Translations[edit]

The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables, removing any numbers. Numbers do not necessarily match those in definitions. See instructions at Wiktionary:Entry layout#Translations.

References[edit]

  1. ^ pauper” in Douglas Harper, Online Etymology Dictionary, 2001–2019.

Further reading[edit]


Dalmatian[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin pauper.

Adjective[edit]

pauper

  1. poor

Latin[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Ultimately from Proto-Indo-European *peh₂w- (few, small) (English few).

Pronunciation[edit]

Adjective[edit]

pauper (genitive pauperis); third declension

  1. poor

Inflection[edit]

Third declension, non-i-stem (genitive plural in -um).

Number Singular Plural
Case / Gender Masc./Fem. Neuter Masc./Fem. Neuter
Nominative pauper pauper pauperēs paupera
Genitive pauperis pauperis pauperum pauperum
Dative pauperī pauperī pauperibus pauperibus
Accusative pauperem pauper pauperēs paupera
Ablative paupere paupere pauperibus pauperibus
Vocative pauper pauper pauperēs paupera
  • comparative: pauperior, superlative: pauperrimus
  • In Late or Vulgar Latin, this third declension adjective seems to be regularized to first/second declension, like in the attested forms pauperus and paupera

Derived terms[edit]

Related terms[edit]

Descendants[edit]

References[edit]


Middle English[edit]

Noun[edit]

pauper

  1. Alternative form of paper