dire

Definition from Wiktionary, the free dictionary
Jump to: navigation, search
See also: diré

English[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin dirus (fearful, ominous).

Pronunciation[edit]

Adjective[edit]

dire (comparative direr or more dire, superlative direst or most dire)

  1. Warning of bad consequences: ill-boding; portentous.
    dire omens
  2. Requiring action to prevent bad consequences: urgent, pressing.
    dire need
  3. Expressing bad consequences: dreadful; dismal; horrible; terrible; lamentable.
    dire consequences
    be in dire straits
  4. (Informal) Bad in quality, awful, terrible.
    • 2011 December 10, Arindam Rej, “Norwich 4 - 2 Newcastle”, BBC Sport:
      A second Norwich goal in four minutes arrived after some dire Newcastle defending. Gosling gave the ball away with a sloppy back-pass, allowing Crofts to curl in a cross that the unmarked Morison powered in with a firm, 12-yard header.

Quotations[edit]

Derived terms[edit]

Translations[edit]

See also[edit]

Anagrams[edit]


French[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin dīcere, present active infinitive of dīcō.

Pronunciation[edit]

Verb[edit]

dire

  1. to say, to tell

Conjugation[edit]

Derived terms[edit]

Noun[edit]

dire m (plural dires)

  1. saying (that which is said)
  2. belief, opinion

Anagrams[edit]


Italian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin dīcere, present active infinitive of dīcō.

Pronunciation[edit]

Verb[edit]

dire

  1. (transitive, intransitive) to say, tell
  2. (transitive, intransitive) to recite
  3. (transitive, intransitive) to mean
  4. (transitive, intransitive) to think
  5. (transitive, intransitive) to admit

Conjugation[edit]

Related terms[edit]

Anagrams[edit]


Latin[edit]

Adjective[edit]

dīre

  1. vocative masculine singular of dīrus

Middle French[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin dīcere, present active infinitive of dīcō.

Verb[edit]

dire

  1. to say (express using language)

Occitan[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin dīcere, present active infinitive of dīcō.

Verb[edit]

dire

  1. to say (express using language)
  2. to mean; to signify

Old French[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin dīcere, present active infinitive of dīcō.

Verb[edit]

dire

  1. (chiefly intransitive) to say
  2. (transitive) to recount (a story)

Descendants[edit]


Old Provençal[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin dīcere, present active infinitive of dīcō.

Verb[edit]

dire

  1. to say

Walloon[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old French dire, from Latin dīcō, dīcere.

Verb[edit]

dire

  1. to say