dier

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See also: Dier

English[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From die +‎ -er.

Noun[edit]

dier (plural diers)

  1. One who dies.
    • 1985, Don DeLillo, White Noise
      It's a way of controlling death. A way of gaining the ultimate upper hand. Be the killer for a change. Let someone else be the dier.
    • 2006, Shankar Mokashi Punekar, Awadheswari:
      Since other languages are structurally constrained to say who it was who died and since the original leaves the identity of the dier unexpressed, any translation in the target language is going to be incorrect.

Usage notes[edit]

  • Used in abstract and philosophical contexts, rather than in discussing a known individual who has died. Compare deceased.

Anagrams[edit]


Afrikaans[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Dutch dier, from Middle Dutch dier, from Old Dutch *dior, from Proto-West Germanic *deuʀ, from Proto-Germanic *deuzą, from Proto-Indo-European *dʰewsóm.

Noun[edit]

dier (plural diere)

  1. animal
  2. beast; brute

Dutch[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /dir/, [diːr], [diər]
  • (file)
  • Hyphenation: dier
  • Rhymes: -ir

Etymology 1[edit]

From Middle Dutch dier, from Old Dutch dier, from Proto-West Germanic *deuʀ, from Proto-Germanic *deuzą, from Proto-Indo-European *dʰewsóm.

Noun[edit]

dier n (plural dieren, diminutive diertje n)

  1. animal, any member of the kingdom Animalia
Usage notes[edit]

Sometimes used as a term of endearment or flirtation, as in the phrase lekker dier.

Derived terms[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

From Middle Dutch dier.

Determiner[edit]

dier

  1. (demonstrative) her, their, the latter's (genitive feminine singular and genitive plural of die).
    De verdachte heeft zich samen met een vriend, haar dochter en dier vriend schuldig gemaakt aan de moord op haar echtgenoot [...] (from a verdict of the Court of Justice at 's-Gravenhage, 2011 [1])
    The accused (woman) is guilty of having murdered her husband in cooperation with a friend, her daughter and the latter's friend [...]
Usage notes[edit]

Dier is used in a similar way as the possessive determiners haar and hun. It is rare in spoken Dutch, but used occasionally in writing to avoid confusion. Compare:

  • Zij vertelde van haar dochter en haar man.She told of her daughter and her (own) husband.
  • Zij vertelde van haar dochter en dier man.She told of her daughter and the latter's husband.

The corresponding masculine and neuter singular form is diens.

Etymology 3[edit]

Adjective[edit]

dier (comparative dierder, superlative dierst)

  1. (dialectal, archaic) Alternative form of duur
Derived terms[edit]

Anagrams[edit]


Elfdalian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old Norse þeir, þær, from Proto-Germanic *þai. Cognate with Swedish de.

Pronoun[edit]

dier

  1. they

Luxembourgish[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old High German durri, from Proto-Germanic *þursuz. Cognate with German dürr, Dutch dor, Swedish torr, Icelandic þurr.

Pronunciation[edit]

Adjective[edit]

dier (masculine dieren, neuter diert, comparative méi dier, superlative am diersten)

  1. (of plants and trees) dry, dead

Declension[edit]


Middle Dutch[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Old Dutch dier, from Proto-West Germanic *deuʀ, from Proto-Germanic *deuzą, from Proto-Indo-European *dʰewsóm.

Noun[edit]

dier n

  1. animal
Inflection[edit]

This noun needs an inflection-table template.

Descendants[edit]
  • Dutch: dier
  • Limburgish: deer

Etymology 2[edit]

See the etymology of the main entry.

Determiner[edit]

dier

  1. inflection of die:
    1. feminine genitive/dative singular
    2. genitive plural

Further reading[edit]


Norwegian Bokmål[edit]

Verb[edit]

dier

  1. present tense of die

Old Dutch[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-West Germanic *deuʀ, from Proto-Germanic *deuzą, from Proto-Indo-European *dʰewsóm.

Noun[edit]

dier n

  1. animal

Inflection[edit]

This noun needs an inflection-table template.

Descendants[edit]

Further reading[edit]

  • dier”, in Oudnederlands Woordenboek, 2012

Slovak[edit]

Noun[edit]

dier

  1. genitive plural of diera

West Frisian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old Frisian diār, from Proto-West Germanic *deuʀ, from Proto-Germanic *deuzą, from Proto-Indo-European *dʰewsóm.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

dier n (plural dieren, diminutive dierke)

  1. animal

Derived terms[edit]

Further reading[edit]

  • dier”, in Wurdboek fan de Fryske taal (in Dutch), 2011