latter

Definition from Wiktionary, the free dictionary
Jump to navigation Jump to search
See also: łatter

English[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old English lætra, comparative form of læt (late). Doublet of later; also, cognate with last, whose doublet is latest.

Pronunciation[edit]

Adjective[edit]

latter (not comparable)

  1. Relating to or being the second of two items.
    • March 2017, Jennifer S. Holland, “For These Monkeys, It’s a Fight for Survival.”, in National Geographic[1]:
      On sale next to dried fish and chicken feet were rats and bats (the latter's wings in a pile like leather scraps, also for sale), plus cut-up pigs and monkeys, their faces intact.
    • 1725, Isaac Watts, Logick, or The Right Use of Reason in the Enquiry After Truth With a Variety of Rules to Guard:
  2. Near (or nearer) to the end.
  3. In the past, but close (or closer) to the present time.

Antonyms[edit]

Derived terms[edit]

Related terms[edit]

Translations[edit]

Anagrams[edit]


Danish[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old Norse hlátr, from Proto-Germanic *hlahtraz (laughter), cognate with Norwegian lått, English laughter and German Gelächter. Derived from the verb *hlahjaną (to laugh), cf. Danish le, English laugh, German lachen.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

latter c (singular definite latteren, not used in plural form)

  1. laughter

Inflection[edit]


Norman[edit]

Etymology[edit]

(This etymology is missing or incomplete. Please add to it, or discuss it at the Etymology scriptorium.)

Verb[edit]

latter

  1. (Jersey) to beat, spank, cane

Synonyms[edit]


Norwegian Bokmål[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old Norse hlátr

Noun[edit]

latter m (definite singular latteren) (uncountable)

  1. laughter
  2. laugh
    en god lattera good laugh

Synonyms[edit]

Derived terms[edit]

References[edit]


French[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Verb[edit]

latter

  1. to lath

Conjugation[edit]

Further reading[edit]