latter

Definition from Wiktionary, the free dictionary
Jump to navigation Jump to search
See also: łatter

English[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old English lætra, comparative form of læt (late). Doublet of later; also, cognate with last, whose doublet is latest.

Pronunciation[edit]

Adjective[edit]

latter (not comparable)

  1. Relating to or being the second of two items.
    • March 2017, Jennifer S. Holland, “For These Monkeys, It’s a Fight for Survival.”, in National Geographic[1]:
      On sale next to dried fish and chicken feet were rats and bats (the latter's wings in a pile like leather scraps, also for sale), plus cut-up pigs and monkeys, their faces intact.
    • 1725, Isaac Watts, Logick: Or, The Right Use of Reason in the Enquiry after Truth, [], 2nd edition, London: [] John Clark and Richard Hett, [], Emanuel Matthews, [], and Richard Ford, [], published 1726, →OCLC:
      the difference between reason and revelation, and in what sense the latter is superior
  2. Near (or nearer) to the end.
  3. In the past, but close (or closer) to the present time.

Antonyms[edit]

Derived terms[edit]

Related terms[edit]

Translations[edit]

Anagrams[edit]

Danish[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old Norse hlátr, from Proto-Germanic *hlahtraz (laughter), cognate with Norwegian lått, English laughter and German Gelächter. Derived from the verb *hlahjaną (to laugh), cf. Danish le, English laugh, German lachen.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

latter c (singular definite latteren, not used in plural form)

  1. laughter

Declension[edit]

French[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Verb[edit]

latter

  1. to lath

Conjugation[edit]

Further reading[edit]

Norman[edit]

Etymology[edit]

(This etymology is missing or incomplete. Please add to it, or discuss it at the Etymology scriptorium.)

Verb[edit]

latter

  1. (Jersey) to beat, spank, cane

Synonyms[edit]

Norwegian Bokmål[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old Norse hlátr.

Noun[edit]

latter m (definite singular latteren) (uncountable)

  1. laughter
  2. laugh
    en god lattera good laugh

Synonyms[edit]

Derived terms[edit]

References[edit]