ce

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Translingual[edit]

Symbol[edit]

ce

  1. (international standards) ISO 639-1 language code for Chechen.

English[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

ce (plural ces)

  1. Alternative form of cee (the letter C)
    • 2003, David Sacks, The Alphabet: Unraveling the Mystery of the Alphabet from A to Z, page 89:
      [T]hat spelling, but not the pronunciation, supplies our own name for the letter: “ce” or “cee.”

Anagrams[edit]

Catalan[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

ce f (plural ces)

  1. The name of the Latin-script letter C.

Derived terms[edit]

Central Nahuatl[edit]

Central Nahuatl cardinal numbers
 <  0 1 2  > 
    Cardinal : ce
    Ordinal : inic ce

Etymology[edit]

Cognate to Classical Nahuatl ce

Numeral[edit]

ce

  1. one.

Classical Nahuatl[edit]

Classical Nahuatl numbers (edit)
10
1 2  →  10  → 
    Cardinal: ce
    Ordinal: ic ce
    Adverbial: ceppa
    Distributive: cēcen, cehcen

Etymology[edit]

(This etymology is missing or incomplete. Please add to it, or discuss it at the Etymology scriptorium.)

Pronunciation[edit]

Numeral[edit]

ce

  1. (it is) one in number.

Usage notes[edit]

  • The combing form of ce is cen- (or cem- before m and p).

Derived terms[edit]

References[edit]

Eastern Huasteca Nahuatl[edit]

Eastern Huasteca Nahuatl cardinal numbers
 <  0 1 2  > 
    Cardinal : ce
    Ordinal : achtohui

Etymology[edit]

Cognate to Classical Nahuatl ce

Numeral[edit]

ce

  1. one.

French[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /sə/
  • (Parisian) IPA(key): /sø/
  • (file)
  • Rhymes:
  • Homophone: se

Etymology 1[edit]

Inherited from Middle French, from Old French cel, cil, from Vulgar Latin *ecce ille. See also celui, derived from the oblique cases of the same.

The inflected forms continue Old French cest, cist, from Vulgar Latin *ecce iste.

Determiner[edit]

ce m (before a vowel or mute h cet, feminine cette, plural ces)

  1. this, that
Usage notes[edit]

To distinguish between the this and that senses, one may use the particles -ci and -là, respectively. See also celui-ci and celui-là, or ceci and cela.

Etymology 2[edit]

Inherited from Old French ço, from Late Latin ecce hoc.

Alternative forms[edit]

Pronoun[edit]

ce m or f (plural ce)

  1. (subject of être, with predicative adjectives or relative clauses, singular only) it, this, that (see § Usage notes, below)
    C’est beau !It is beautiful!
    est-ce que...?forms yes–no questions (literally, “is it that...?”)
    ce dont je parlaisthat which I was speaking of
    C’eût été avec plaisir, mais...It would have been with pleasure, but...
    C’eût été dommage...It would have been a pity...
  2. (subject of être, with predicate nouns) he, she, it, this, that
    C’est un/une célébrité.He/she is a celebrity.
    Ce sont des célébrités.These are celebrities.
    Ce sont des gens bien.These are good people.
    • 1897, Edmond Rostand, Cyrano de Bergerac :
      C'est un roc ! ... c'est un pic ! ... c'est un cap ! Que dis-je, c'est un cap ? ... C'est une péninsule !
      It's a rock! ... it's a peak! ... it's a cape! What am I saying, a cape? ... It's a peninsula!
  3. (archaic, subject of verbs other than être) it, this, that
    ce sembleit seems
    ce peuvent être...these may be...
    • 1866, Guérineau de Boisvillette, Ce qu'il a laissé![2], page 56:
      [...] ce paraissent être encore là des points à noter [...]
      [] these seem to be more points worth noting []
Usage notes[edit]

(1): To convey the plural with a predicative adjective, one must use ils m or elles f (they):

Ils/Elles sont beaux/belles !They are beautiful!

And to convey the plural with a relative clause, one must use ceux m or celles f (plural forms of celui m and celle f):

ceux/celles que...those which...
ceux/celles qui...those who/that...
ceux/celles dont je parlais...those which I was speaking of...
Derived terms[edit]
Related terms[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Louis Philipon De La Madelaine (1802) Des homonymes français ou mots qui dans notre langue se ressemblent par le son et diffèrent par le sens[1], page 85

Further reading[edit]

Friulian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin quid. Compare Italian che, Venetian ché, Romanian ce.

Pronoun[edit]

ce

  1. what

See also[edit]

Gun[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Cognates include Fon

Pronunciation[edit]

Determiner[edit]

(Benin)

  1. my (first-person singular possessive adjective)

See also[edit]

Gungbe personal pronouns
Number Person Emphatic Pronoun Subject Pronoun Object Pronoun Possessive Determiner
Singular First nyɛ́, yẹ́n ùn, n mi , ṣié
Second jɛ̀, jẹ̀, yẹ̀, hiẹ̀ à tòwè
Third éɔ̀, úɔ̀, éwọ̀ é è étɔ̀n, étọ̀n
Plural First mílɛ́, mílẹ́ mítɔ̀n, mítọ̀n
Second mìlɛ́, mìlẹ́ mìtɔ̀n, mìtọ̀n
Third yélɛ́, yélẹ́ yétɔ̀n, yétọ̀n

Ido[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

ce (plural ce-i)

  1. The name of the Latin script letter C/c.

See also[edit]

Indonesian[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /ˈt͡ʃe/, [ˈt͡ʃe]

Noun[edit]

  1. The name of the Latin-script letter C/c.

Synonyms[edit]

  • si (Standard Malay)

See also[edit]

Further reading[edit]

Italian[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /ˈt͡ʃe/
  • Rhymes: -e
  • Hyphenation:

Pronoun[edit]

ce

  1. Alternative form of ci (us)

Usage notes[edit]

  • Used when followed by a third-person direct object clitic (lo, la, li, le, or ne).

See also[edit]

Adverb[edit]

ce

  1. here

Italiot Greek[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Ancient Greek καί (kaí).

Conjunction[edit]

ce

  1. and

Latin[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

 f (indeclinable)

  1. The name of the letter C.

Coordinate terms[edit]

References[edit]

  • ce”, in Charlton T. Lewis and Charles Short (1879) A Latin Dictionary, Oxford: Clarendon Press
  • ce”, in Charlton T. Lewis (1891) An Elementary Latin Dictionary, New York: Harper & Brothers
  • ce in Gaffiot, Félix (1934) Dictionnaire illustré latin-français, Hachette.
  • Arthur E. Gordon, The Letter Names of the Latin Alphabet (University of California Press, 1973; volume 9 of University of California Publications: Classical Studies), part III: “Summary of the Ancient Evidence”, page 32: "Clearly there is no question or doubt about the names of the vowels A, E, I, O, U. They are simply long A, long E, etc. (ā, ē, ī, ō, ū). Nor is there any uncertainty with respect to the six mutes B, C, D, G, P, T. Their names are bē, cē, dē, gē, pē, tē (each with a long E). Or about H, K, and Q: they are hā, kā, kū—each, again, with a long vowel sound."

Mandarin[edit]

Romanization[edit]

ce

  1. Nonstandard spelling of .
  2. Nonstandard spelling of cê̄.

Usage notes[edit]

  • Transcriptions of Mandarin into the Latin script often do not distinguish between the critical tonal differences employed in the Mandarin language, using words such as this one without indication of tone.

Mapudungun[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

  • che (Unified Alphabet)

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

ce (Raguileo spelling)

  1. person
  2. people

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  • Wixaleyiñ: Mapucezugun-wigkazugun pici hemvlcijka (Wixaleyiñ: Small Mapudungun-Spanish dictionary), Beretta, Marta; Cañumil, Dario; Cañumil, Tulio, 2008.

Middle English[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Old English .

Noun[edit]

ce

  1. Alternative form of see (sea)
Descendants[edit]
  • English: sea

Etymology 2[edit]

From Old French sei.

Noun[edit]

ce

  1. Alternative form of see (see)
Descendants[edit]

Middle French[edit]

Adjective[edit]

ce m (feminine singular ceste, masculine and feminine plural ces, masculine singular before a vowel cest)

  1. this (the one in question)
    • 1571, Pedro Díaz, Dallier, Nouueaux advertissemens trescertains venus du paÿs des Indes Meridionales [] page 5
      Mais considerant que les Chrestiens nouvellement faits en ce pays, estoient en si grand nombre que nous ne les pouvions visiter
      But considering that the newly made Christians in this country were so numerous that we couldn't visit all of them

Neapolitan[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Akin to Italian ci; see there for more.

Pronunciation[edit]

Pronoun[edit]

ce (adverbial)

  1. there (at a place)

Occitan[edit]

Noun[edit]

ce f (plural ces)

  1. cee (the letter c)

Old Irish[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Pronoun[edit]

ce

  1. Alternative form of cía

Conjunction[edit]

ce

  1. Alternative form of cía
    • c. 800, Würzburg Glosses on the Pauline Epistles, published in Thesaurus Palaeohibernicus (reprinted 1987, Dublin Institute for Advanced Studies), edited and with translations by Whitley Stokes and John Strachan, vol. I, pp. 499–712, Wb. 10c21
      Ba torad sa⟨í⟩thir dúun in chrud so ce du·melmis cech túari et ce du·gnemmis a ndu·gníat ar céli, act ní bad nertad na mbráithre et frescsiu fochricce as móo.
      It would be a fruit of our labor in this way if we consumed every food and if we did what our fellows do, but it would not be a strengthening of the brothers and a hope of a greater reward.
    • c. 800, Würzburg Glosses on the Pauline Epistles, published in Thesaurus Palaeohibernicus (reprinted 1987, Dublin Institute for Advanced Studies), edited and with translations by Whitley Stokes and John Strachan, vol. I, pp. 499–712, Wb. 34a4
      ɔrabad cech bráthair post alium .i. is huisse ce ru·samaltar fri Críst
      so that each brother should be after the other, i.e. it is right that he be compared to Christ

Pochutec[edit]

Etymology[edit]

C.f. Classical Nahuatl .

Pronunciation[edit]

Numeral[edit]

ce

  1. one

References[edit]

Romanian[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Inherited from Latin quid, from Proto-Indo-European *kʷid, compare *kʷis.

Pronunciation[edit]

Pronoun[edit]

ce

  1. what
    Ce vrei faci?
    What do you want to do?

Related terms[edit]

Spanish[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

ce f (plural ces)

  1. The name of the Latin-script letter C.

Derived terms[edit]

Further reading[edit]

Tagalog[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Spanish ce, the Spanish name of the letter C/c.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

ce (Baybayin spelling ᜐᜒ)

  1. (historical) The name of the Latin-script letter C/c, in the Abecedario.
    Synonym: (in the Filipino alphabet) si

Tarantino[edit]

Pronoun[edit]

ce (relative)

  1. who

Conjunction[edit]

ce

  1. if

Tocharian B[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Clipping of kuce, used colloquially and informally.

Pronoun[edit]

ce

  1. (interrogative) who, what, which

Turkish[edit]

Noun[edit]

ce

  1. The name of the Latin-script letter C.

See also[edit]

Welsh[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

ce f (plural ceau)

  1. The name of the Latin-script letter K.

Mutation[edit]

This word cannot be mutated.

See also[edit]

Zarma[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Cognate with Koyraboro Senni cee (foot).

Noun[edit]

ce

  1. foot, leg