me

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English[edit]

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Wikipedia

Etymology 1[edit]

From Middle English me, from Old English ‎(me, originally dative, but later also accusative), from Proto-Germanic *miz ‎(me), from Proto-Indo-European *(e)me-, *(e)me-n- ‎(me). Cognate with Scots me ‎(me), North Frisian me ‎(me), Saterland Frisian mie ‎(me), Dutch me, mij ‎(me), Low German mi ‎(me), German mir ‎(me, dative), Icelandic mér ‎(me, dative), Latin ‎(me), Ancient Greek μέ ‎(), ἐμέ ‎(emé, me), Sanskrit मा ‎(, me).

Pronunciation[edit]

Pronoun[edit]

me ‎(first-person singular pronoun, referring to the speaker)

  1. As the direct object of a verb.
    Can you hear me?
  2. (obsolete) Myself; as a reflexive direct object of a verb.
  3. As the object of a preposition.
    Come with me.
  4. As the indirect object of a verb.
    He gave me this.
  5. (US, colloquial) Myself; as a reflexive indirect object of a verb; the ethical dative.
    • 1993 April, Harper’s Magazine,
      When I get to college, I’m gonna get me a white Nissan Sentra.
  6. (colloquial) As the complement of the copula (“be” or “is”).
    It wasn't me.
  7. (Australia, Britain, New Zealand, colloquial) My; preceding a noun, marking ownership.
    • a. 1918, Wilfred Owen, The Letter, in 1994, Douglas Kerr (editor), The Works of Wilfred Owen, page 54,
      There don′t seem much to say just now. / (Yer what? Then don′t, yer ruddy cow! / And give us back me cigarette!)
  8. (colloquial, with "and") As the subject of a verb.
    Me and my friends played a game.
  9. (nonstandard, not with "and") As the subject of a verb.
    • 1844, Charles Wilkes, Narrative of the United States Exploring Expedition, Vol. II,
      One of them, whose sobriquet was Big-headed Blackboy, was stretched out before the fire, and no answer could be obtained from him, but a drawling repetition, in grunts of displeasure, of “Bel (not) me want to go.”
    • 2005, Michael Chapman & Matthew Chapman, Teen Girl Squad Issue 10 (cartoon), part of Homestar Runner
      Strong Bad: Me gotta see that again.
Usage notes[edit]
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You can help Wiktionary verify this information by introducing appropriate citations.

Me is traditionally described as the accusative pronoun, meaning it should be used as the object of verbs and prepositions, while the nominative pronoun I should be used as the subject of verbs. However, “accusative” pronouns are widely used as the subject of verbs in colloquial speech if they are accompanied by and, for example, "me and her are friends". This usage is traditionally considered incorrect, and "she and I are friends" would be the preferred construction.

Using me as the lone subject (without and) of a verb (e.g. "me want", "me like") is a feature of various types of both pidgin English and that of infant English-learners, and is sometimes used by speakers of standard English for jocular effect (e.g. "me likee", "me wantee").

Although in the spoken version of some dialects 'me' is commonly used as a possessive, in writing, speakers of these dialects usually use my.

Some prescriptivists object to the use of me following the verb to be, as in “It wasn’t me”. The phrase “It was not I” is considered to be correct, though this may be seen as extreme and used for jocular effect.

Synonyms[edit]
  • (subject of a verb): I; my ass (vulgar or slang)
  • (reflexive object): myself
  • (complement of the copula): I
  • (indirect object): us (Australia, UK)
  • (marking ownership): my; mine (archaic)
Translations[edit]
The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables, removing any numbers. Numbers do not necessarily match those in definitions. See instructions at Help:How to check translations.

Etymology 2[edit]

Determiner[edit]

me

  1. (dialectal) Eye dialect spelling of my.

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  • A Dictionary of North East Dialect, Bill Griffiths, 2005, Northumbria University Press, ISBN 1904794165
  • Newcastle 1970s, Scott Dobson and Dick Irwin, [1]

Statistics[edit]

Most common English words before 1923: their · one · so · #40: me · an · we · who

Anagrams[edit]


Albanian[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Proto-Albanian *me(t). Cognate to Ancient Greek μετά ‎(metá, after, beyond;in the middle, between), Gothic miþ ‎(miþ, with), Old Norse með.

Preposition[edit]

me (+accusative)

  1. with (accompanied by)
    Shkoj me tim vëlla.
    I'm going with my brother.
  2. with (possessing)
    E sheh djalin me sytë e kaltër?
    Do you see the guy with blue eyes?
  3. with (by means of)
    Preferoj të shkruaj me penë.
    I prefer to write with a pen.

Etymology 2[edit]

From Proto-Indo-European *manu, compare Ancient Greek (Hom.) μανός ‎(manós, thin), Old Armenian մանր ‎(manr, small). Alternatively it could represent a continuation of Proto-Indo-European *mṇi̯ō, to be compared with Latin minuō ‎(lessen), Slavic *mьnь 'smaller' and the like.

Adjective[edit]

me m ‎(feminine mee)

  1. insufficient, scanty, not full
Derived terms[edit]
Derived terms[edit]

Annobonese[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Portuguese mãe ‎(mother), from Old Portuguese mãy, madre ‎(mother), from Latin mātrem, accusative singular of māter ‎(mother, matron), ultimately from Proto-Indo-European *méh₂tēr ‎(mother).

Noun[edit]

me

  1. mother

References[edit]

  • 2005, John H. McWhorter, Defining Creole

Asturian[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

  • m' (before a vowel)

Etymology[edit]

From Latin , accusative singular of ego. As an indirect pronoun, possibly in part from Latin mihi (dative singular of ego), through a Vulgar Latin *mi.

Pronoun[edit]

me

  1. me (first-person plural direct pronoun)
  2. me (first-person plural indirect pronoun)

Carolinian[edit]

Conjunction[edit]

me

  1. and

Catalan[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin (accusative of ego), from Proto-Indo-European *(e)me-.

Pronoun[edit]

me ‎(enclitic, contracted 'm, proclitic em, contracted proclitic m')

  1. me (direct or indirect object)

Declension[edit]

Related terms[edit]


Chuukese[edit]

Conjunction[edit]

me

  1. and

Preposition[edit]

me

  1. from

Dutch[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Pronoun[edit]

me

  1. me; First-person singular, objective, mute form of mij

Inflection[edit]



Estonian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Finnic *me.

Pronoun[edit]

me ‎(genitive me, partitive meid)

  1. we

Declension[edit]

This pronoun needs an inflection-table template.


Finnish[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Finnic *mek, From Proto-Uralic *me. Cognate with Estonian me, Hungarian mi.

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /ˈme/
  • Hyphenation: me
  • Rhymes: -e

Pronoun[edit]

me ‎(stem mei-)

  1. we

Inflection[edit]

Usage notes[edit]

  • Although usually omitted in written language (the verb shows both the person and the number), the pronoun is in spoken language practically always used. (compare the usage of minä ‎(I))

Synonyms[edit]

See also[edit]


French[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Middle French me, from Old French me, from Latin (accusative of ego), from Proto-Indo-European *(e)me-, *(e)me-n- ‎(me). Northern dialects have preserved a form mi for the indirect object (also found in Old French in the Oaths of Strasbourg), from Latin mihi, dative singular of ego, through a Vulgar Latin *mi, whereas in standard French, it has merged into me.

Pronunciation[edit]

Pronoun[edit]

me ‎(personal, objective case)

  1. (direct object) me
  2. (indirect object) to me
Related terms[edit]

External links[edit]


Galician[edit]

Etymology[edit]

As an accusative singular/objective direct pronoun and reflexive pronoun, from Old Portuguese me, from Latin , accusative singular form of ego. As a dative singular/objective indirect pronoun, possibly in part from Latin mihi (dative singular form of ego), through a Vulgar Latin *mi.

Pronoun[edit]

me accusative and dative (nominative eu, oblique min)

  1. (to) me (dative singular first-person personal pronoun)
  2. me (accusative singular first-person personal pronoun)
  3. myself (reflexive singular first-person personal pronoun)

See also[edit]


Guaraní[edit]

Noun[edit]

me

  1. male
  2. husband

Haitian Creole[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From French mai ‎(May)

Noun[edit]

me

  1. May

Hawaiian[edit]

Preposition[edit]

me

  1. with

Icelandic[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Interjection[edit]

me

  1. baa (representing the bleating sound sheep make)

Ido[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From English me, French me, Italian me, Spanish me, from Proto-Indo-European *(e)me-, *(e)me-n- ‎(me).

Pronunciation[edit]

Pronoun[edit]

me ‎(first-person singular)

  1. I, me
    Me es tre felica.
    I am very happy.
    Ka vu parolas a me?
    Are you talking to me?

Derived terms[edit]

  • mea ‎(my, mine)
  • meo ‎(something belonging to me)

Istriot[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin , accusative singular of ego.

Pronoun[edit]

me

  1. objective of i; me; to me
    • 1877, Antonio Ive, Canti popolari istriani: raccolti a Rovigno, volume 5, Ermanno Loescher, page 40:
      Ti me pari oûna dea infra li dai,
      You seem to me a goddess among the gods,

Italian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin .

Pronunciation[edit]

Pronoun[edit]

me ‎(personal, objective case)

  1. to me

Related terms[edit]


Japanese[edit]

Romanization[edit]

me

  1. rōmaji reading of
  2. rōmaji reading of

Kurdish[edit]

Pronoun[edit]

me

  1. we (the speaker/writer and at least one other person)


This Kurdish entry was created from the translations listed at we. It may be less reliable than other entries, and may be missing parts of speech or additional senses. Please also see me in the Kurdish Wiktionary. This notice will be removed when the entry is checked. (more information) April 2008


Latin[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Indo-European *(e)me-, *(e)me-n- ‎(me). Cognate with Ancient Greek με ‎(me), εμέ ‎(emé, me), Sanskrit मा ‎(, me), Old English me, Old Frisian mi, Old Saxon , Dutch mij, Old High German mih (German mich), Old Norse mik, Gothic 𐌼𐌹𐌺 ‎(mik). The Indo-European root is also the source of Latin me, Greek με ‎(me), Old Irish (Irish , Welsh mi), Proto-Slavic *mene (Old Church Slavonic мене ‎(mene), Russian меня́ ‎(menjá)), Lithuanian mi, Albanian mua.

Pronunciation[edit]

Pronoun[edit]

‎(personal pronoun)

  1. me, myself; accusative singular of ego
  2. by me, with me, from me; ablative singular of ego

Derived terms[edit]

Descendants[edit]

  • Portuguese: me
  • Romanian:
  • Sicilian: mi
  • Spanish: me

References[edit]

  • me in Charlton T. Lewis & Charles Short (1879) A Latin Dictionary, Oxford: Clarendon Press
  • me in Charlton T. Lewis (1891) An Elementary Latin Dictionary, New York: Harper & Brothers

Lojban[edit]

Cmavo[edit]

me ‎(selma'o ME )

  1. Converts a sumti to a selbri; x1 is specific to the following sumti in aspect x2.
    ti me la meris.
    This is-Mary (or is-related-to-Mary).
    ta me li ny. me'u moi le'i mi ratcu
    That is-the-n-th of-the-set-of my rats.
    That is my n-th rat.

Usage notes[edit]

  • The phrase begun with me, which contains the sumti, can be terminated (if necessary) with me'u.

Mandarin[edit]

Romanization[edit]

me (Zhuyin ㄇㄜ˙)

  1. Pinyin transcription of
  2. Pinyin transcription of
  3. Pinyin transcription of
  4. Pinyin transcription of ,

Usage notes[edit]

  • English transcriptions of Mandarin speech often fail to distinguish between the critical tonal differences employed in the Mandarin language, using words such as this one without the appropriate indication of tone.

Mengen[edit]

Noun[edit]

me

  1. (drinkable) water
  2. any liquid
  3. (non-tidal) stream, river

References[edit]


Middle English[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Old English , from Proto-Indo-European. More at English me.

Pronunciation[edit]

Pronoun[edit]

me

  1. me (first-person singular object pronoun)

Middle French[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

  • m' (before a vowel)

Etymology[edit]

From Old French me.

Pronoun[edit]

me

  1. me, first-person singular object pronoun
  2. to me, first-person singular indirect object pronoun

Synonyms[edit]

  • (first-person singular object and indirect object pronoun): moy (with verbs in the imperative)

Descendants[edit]

  • French: me

Nalca[edit]

Noun[edit]

me

  1. son
  2. child

Nauruan[edit]

Conjunction[edit]

me

  1. and

Neapolitan[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin .

Pronunciation[edit]

Pronoun[edit]

me

  1. me (accusative or dative or reflexive or prepositional)

Coordinate terms[edit]

Number Person Nominative Accusative Dative Reflexive Possessive Prepositional
singular first-person io (i') me mìo, mìa, mieje, meje me, méne
second-person, familiar tu te tùjo, tòja, tùoje, tòje te, téne
second-person, formal vuje ve vuósto, vósta, vuóste, vóste vuje
third-person, masculine ìsso 'o, 'u (lo, lu) 'i, 'e (li, le) se sùjo, sòja, sùoje, sòje ìsso
third-person, feminine éssa 'a (la) 'e (le) éssa
plural first-person nuje ce nuósto, nòsta, nuóste, nòste nuje
second-person, plural vuje ve vuósto, vòsta, vuóste, vòste vuje
third-person, masculine ìsse 'i, 'e (li, le) llòro se llòro (invariable) llòro
third-person, feminine llòro 'e (le)

Norman[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

  • (continental Normandy, Jersey)
  • maïr (Guernsey)

Noun[edit]

me f ‎(plural mes)

  1. (Sark) sea

Norwegian Nynorsk[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Probably from Old Norse mit ‎(us two).

Pronunciation[edit]

Pronoun[edit]

me

  1. we
    Kva skal me gjera?
    What shall we do?

Synonyms[edit]

References[edit]

See also[edit]


Novial[edit]

Pronoun[edit]

me

  1. I; me
  2. (reflexive) myself

Related terms[edit]


Old English[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Germanic *miz, dative of *ek, from Proto-Indo-European *me. Cognate with Old Frisian mi, Old Saxon , Dutch mij, Old High German mih (German mich), Old Norse mik, Gothic 𐌼𐌹𐌺 ‎(mik). The Indo-European root is also the source of Latin me, Greek με ‎(me), Old Irish (Irish , Welsh mi), Proto-Slavic *mene (Old Church Slavonic мене ‎(mene), Russian меня́ ‎(menjá)), Lithuanian mi, Albanian mua.

Pronunciation[edit]

Pronoun[edit]

‎(personal pronoun)

  1. me: accusative or dative singular form of

Old French[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin , accusative of ego. As an indirect object pronoun, possibly in part from Latin mihi, dative singular of ego, through a Vulgar Latin *mi (cf. the form mi in particular, found in early Old French in the Oaths of Strasbourg).

Pronoun[edit]

me

  1. myself (first-person singular reflexive pronoun)
  2. me (first-person singular direct object pronoun)
  3. to me (first-person singular indirect object pronoun)

Related terms[edit]

Descendants[edit]

  • Middle French: me
    • French: me

Portuguese[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old Portuguese me, from Latin (accusative of ego), from Proto-Indo-European *(e)me-. As an objective indirect pronoun, possibly in part from Latin mihi (dative of ego), through a Vulgar Latin *mi.

Pronunciation[edit]

Pronoun[edit]

me ‎(personal pronoun)

  1. first-person singular objective direct personal pronoun; me
    • 2005, Lya Wyler (translator), J. K. Rowling (English author), Harry Potter e o Enigma do Príncipe (Harry Potter and the Half-Blood Prince), Rocco, page 228:
      Você está me chamando de maluco?
      Are you calling me crazy?
    Meus amigos me ligaram.
    My friends called me.
  2. first-person singular objective indirect personal pronoun; (to) me
    Dê-me o copo.
    Give me the glass.
  3. first-person singular reflexive pronoun; myself
    Este tipo de tratamento me faz querer me enforcar.
    This kind of treatment makes me want to hang myself.

Quotations[edit]

For usage examples of this term, see Citations:me.

See also[edit]

Portuguese personal pronouns (edit)
Number Person Nominative
(subject)
Accusative
(direct object)
Dative
(indirect object)
Oblique Oblique
with com
Non-declining
m f m f m and f m f m f m f
Singular First eu me mim comigo
Second tu te ti contigo você
o senhor a senhora
Third ele ela o
(lo, no)
a
(la, na)
lhe ele ela com ele com ela o mesmo a mesma
se (reflexive) si (reflexive) consigo (reflexive)
Plural First nós nos nós connosco (Portugal)
conosco (Brazil)
a gente
Second vós vos vós convosco vocês
os senhores as senhoras
Third eles elas os
(los, nos)
as
(las, nas)
lhes eles elas com eles com elas os mesmos as mesmas
se (reflexive) si (reflexive) consigo (reflexive)
Indefinite se (reflexive) si (reflexive) consigo (reflexive)

Romani[edit]

Pronoun[edit]

me ‎(personal)

  1. I

Scottish Gaelic[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From mar eisimpleir.

Alternative forms[edit]

Adverb[edit]

me

  1. e.g.

Serbo-Croatian[edit]

Pronoun[edit]

me (Cyrillic spelling ме)

  1. of me (genitive singular of ‎(I))
  2. me (accusative singular of ‎(I))

Declension[edit]


Slovene[edit]

Etymology[edit]

EB1911 - Volume 01 - Page 001 - 1.svg This entry lacks etymological information. If you are familiar with the origin of this term, please add it to the page per etymology instructions.

Pronunciation[edit]

Pronoun[edit]

  1. we (feminine and neuter plural, more than two)

Declension[edit]

See also[edit]


Spanish[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin (accusative singular of ego), from Proto-Indo-European *(e)me-. As an indirect object, possibly in part from Latin mihi (dative of ego), through a Vulgar Latin *mi.

Pronunciation[edit]

Pronoun[edit]

me ‎(objective case)

  1. (personal, direct object) me
  2. (personal, indirect object) to me, for me
  3. (personal, reflexive) myself

See also[edit]


Turkish[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

Noun[edit]

me

  1. baa (sound of a sheep)

Etymology 2[edit]

Noun[edit]

me

  1. The name of the Latin-script letter M/m.

See also[edit]


Vietnamese[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

me

  1. tamarind