tut

Definition from Wiktionary, the free dictionary
Jump to navigation Jump to search
See also: TUT, Tut, tút, and tût

English[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

Imitative.

Pronunciation[edit]

Interjection[edit]

tut

  1. Tut tut; an expression of disapproval.
    • 1593, Gabriel Harvey, Pierces Supererogation: Or A New Prayse of the Old Asse, London: Imprinted by Iohn Wolfe, OCLC 165778203; republished as John Payne Collier, editor, Pierces Supererogation: Or A New Prayse of the Old Asse. A Preparative to Certaine Larger Discourses, Intituled Nashes S. Fame (Miscellaneous Tracts. Temp. Eliz. & Jac. I; no. 8), [London: [s.n.], 1870], OCLC 23963073, page 181:
      She [] hath ſtiled him with an immortall penne, the bawewawe of ſchollars, the tutt of gentlemen, the tee-heegh of gentlewomen, the phy of citizens, the blurt of Courtiers, the poogh of good letters, the faph of good manners, and the whoop-hooe of good boyes in London ſtreetes.
  2. Hush; be silent.
Synonyms[edit]

Verb[edit]

tut (third-person singular simple present tuts, present participle tutting, simple past and past participle tutted)

  1. To make a tut tut sound of disapproval.

Etymology 2[edit]

Shortening of tutorial.

Alternative forms[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

tut (plural tuts)

  1. (Internet slang) A tutorial.
    • 2002, "Little Penny", Looking for sites, tuts, videos to learn html (newbie) (on newsgroup alt.html)

Etymology 3[edit]

Compare Swedish tut (a point, pipe, tube), Danish tut (a cornet).

Pronunciation[edit]

Phonetik.svg This entry needs pronunciation information. If you are familiar with enPR or the IPA then please add some!

Noun[edit]

tut (plural tuts)

  1. An imperial ensign consisting of a golden globe with a cross on it.
  2. (Britain, obsolete, dialectal) A hassock.

Etymology 4[edit]

Noun[edit]

tut (plural tuts)

  1. (obsolete) A piece of work.

Verb[edit]

tut (third-person singular simple present tuts, present participle tutting, simple past and past participle tutted)

  1. (obsolete) To work by the piece; to carry out tut-work.

Part or all of this entry has been imported from the 1913 edition of Webster’s Dictionary, which is now free of copyright and hence in the public domain. The imported definitions may be significantly out of date, and any more recent senses may be completely missing.
(See the entry for tut in
Webster’s Revised Unabridged Dictionary, G. & C. Merriam, 1913.)

Anagrams[edit]


Amanab[edit]

Noun[edit]

tut

  1. milk

Aromanian[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin tōtus. Compare Romanian tot.

Adjective[edit]

tut m (feminine tutã, masculine plural tuts, feminine plural tuti/tute)

  1. all

Derived terms[edit]


Danish[edit]

Noun[edit]

tut c (singular definite tutten, plural indefinite tutter)

  1. stall (a cover to a finger)
  2. roll (a roll of coins)

Declension[edit]

Noun[edit]

tut n (singular definite tuttet, plural indefinite tut)

  1. toot

Declension[edit]

References[edit]


Dutch[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

  • (file)
  • Rhymes: -ʏt

Noun[edit]

tut f (plural tutten, diminutive tutje n)

  1. a stiff wooden woman
  2. (chiefly Belgium) a pacifier
    Synonym: fopspeen

French[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Verb[edit]

tut

  1. third-person singular past historic of taire

German[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Verb[edit]

tut

  1. Third-person singular present of tun.
    Es tut mir leid.
    I am sorry.
  2. Second-person plural present of tun.
  3. Imperative plural of tun.

Maltese[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Arabic تُوت(tūt), mulberry.

Noun[edit]

tut m

  1. mulberry

Norwegian Bokmål[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

Noun[edit]

tut m (definite singular tuten, indefinite plural tuter, definite plural tutene)

  1. spout (on a teapot etc.)

Etymology 2[edit]

From the verb tute

Noun[edit]

tut n (definite singular tutet, indefinite plural tut, definite plural tuta or tutene)

  1. toot

Etymology 3[edit]

Verb[edit]

tut

  1. imperative of tute

References[edit]


Norwegian Nynorsk[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

Noun[edit]

tut m (definite singular tuten, indefinite plural tutar, definite plural tutane)

  1. spout (on a teapot, etc.)

Etymology 2[edit]

From the verb tute

Noun[edit]

tut n (definite singular tutet, indefinite plural tut, definite plural tuta)

  1. toot

References[edit]


Old French[edit]

Adjective[edit]

tut m (oblique and nominative feminine singular tute)

  1. (Anglo-Norman) Alternative form of tot

Declension[edit]

Adverb[edit]

tut

  1. (Anglo-Norman) Alternative form of tot

Piedmontese[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin tōtus.

Pronunciation[edit]

Adjective[edit]

tut

  1. all

Pronoun[edit]

tut

  1. everything, all
  2. anything

Noun[edit]

tut m

  1. whole

Romansch[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Latin tōtus.

Adverb[edit]

tut

  1. (Rumantsch Grischun, Sursilvan, Sutsilvan) all
Alternative forms[edit]
  • (Surmiran) tot
  • (Puter, Vallader) tuot

Etymology 2[edit]

Noun[edit]

tut m (plural tuts)

  1. (Sursilvan) nap
Synonyms[edit]

Swedish[edit]

Etymology[edit]

onomatopoeia

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

tut n

  1. The sound of a car horn or a train's whistle; honk.

Declension[edit]

Declension of tut 
Singular Plural
Indefinite Definite Indefinite Definite
Nominative tut tutet tut tuten
Genitive tuts tutets tuts tutens

Turkish[edit]

Verb[edit]

tut

  1. second-person singular imperative of tutmak

Antonyms[edit]


Vilamovian[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

tūt m

  1. death

Volapük[edit]

Noun[edit]

tut (nominative plural tuts)

  1. tooth

Declension[edit]

Derived terms[edit]

Related terms[edit]


Zazaki[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /tut/
  • Hyphenation: tut

Alternative forms[edit]

Noun[edit]

tut m

  1. child