tot

From Wiktionary, the free dictionary
Jump to navigation Jump to search

English[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

Borrowed from Scots tot, a shortened form of totum (small child; tot), of uncertain origin. Compare totter, tottle. Compare also Old Norse tottr (name of a dwarf), Swedish tutte (small child), Danish tommeltot (little child).

Noun[edit]

tot (plural tots)

  1. A small child.
    He learned to run when he was just a tot.
    • 1932, Aldous Huxley, Brave New World[1], London: Chatto & Windus:
      Death conditioning begins at eighteen months. Every tot spends two mornings a week in a Hospital for the Dying. All the best toys are kept there, and they get chocolate cream on death days.
  2. A measure of spirits, especially rum.
    • 1897, Mary H. Kingsley, Travels in West Africa:
      Then I give them a tot of rum apiece, as they sit huddled in their blankets.
    • 1916, Siegfried Sassoon, The Working Party:
      And tot of rum to send him warm to sleep.
  3. Ellipsis of tater tot.
  4. (Barbados) A small cup, usually made of tin.
  5. (UK, dialect, obsolete) A foolish fellow.
    • a. 1660, A Contemporary History Of Affairs In Ireland:
      Whoe answeared like a toute, or a maddman, as he was, that he was for the Kinge.
Derived terms[edit]
Translations[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

Clipping of total (to sum)

Verb[edit]

tot (third-person singular simple present tots, present participle totting, simple past and past participle totted)

  1. To sum or total.
    • 2017, Paul Lockhart, Arithmetic:
      There are, of course, many ways to proceed from here, the most likely being that you, as an experienced tradesman, would simply know what these amounts come to (in terms of groups of ten) and can tot them up in your head.
  2. (UK, historical) To mark (a debt) with the word tot (Latin for "so much"), indicating that it was good or collectible for the amount specified.
    a totted debt
Derived terms[edit]

Noun[edit]

tot (plural tots)

  1. A total, an addition of a long column of figures.

Anagrams[edit]

Afrikaans[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Dutch tot, from Middle Dutch tot, tōte, from Old Dutch tote, toti (to, until).

Pronunciation[edit]

Conjunction[edit]

tot

  1. until

Preposition[edit]

tot

  1. until

Aragonese[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin totus.

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /ˈtot/
  • Rhymes: -ot
  • Syllabification: tot

Determiner[edit]

tot m sg (feminine tota or toda, masculine plural totz, feminine plural totas or todas)

  1. all

Pronoun[edit]

tot m sg (feminine tota or toda, masculine plural totz, feminine plural totas or todas)

  1. all of it

Derived terms[edit]

References[edit]

  • todo”, in Aragonario, diccionario castellano–aragonés (in Spanish)

Aromanian[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Noun[edit]

tot m (plural toteanj)

  1. old man
  2. grandfather

Synonyms[edit]

See also[edit]

Catalan[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Inherited from Vulgar Latin tōttus, alteration of Classical Latin tōtus.

Pronunciation[edit]

Adjective[edit]

tot (feminine tota, masculine plural tots, feminine plural totes)

  1. all
    Antonym: cap

Pronoun[edit]

tot

  1. everything
    Antonym: res

Derived terms[edit]

Further reading[edit]

Chinook Jargon[edit]

Noun[edit]

tot

  1. uncle

Coordinate terms[edit]

  • (with regard to gender): kwalh

Crimean Tatar[edit]

Noun[edit]

tot

  1. rust, corrosion

Dalmatian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin tōtus. Compare Romanian, Romansch, Occitan, and Catalan tot, Italian tutto, French tout, Spanish and Portuguese todo.

Adjective[edit]

tot (feminine tota, masculine plural toč)

  1. all

Pronoun[edit]

tot

  1. everything

Dutch[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Middle Dutch tot, tōte, from Old Dutch tote, toti (to, until), equivalent to toe + te. Compare Old Saxon tōte (to, until), Old Frisian tot (until), Old High German zuo ze.

Pronunciation[edit]

Preposition[edit]

tot

  1. to, up to
  2. until
  3. (telephony, Suriname) Used to answer a telephone call, followed by one's name, shortened from "u spreekt tot..."
    Synonym: (Netherlands) met
    • 2020 August 25, Gerold Rozenblad, “Tafra drai [The table has turned]”, in De Ware Tijd[2], retrieved 14 July 2021:
      Gaat een telefoon over ergens in Paramaribo. "Ja, halloo tot Rabin."
      A phone rings somewhere in Paramaribo. "Yes, hello. This is Rabin."

Inflection[edit]

Derived terms[edit]

Descendants[edit]

  • Afrikaans: tot
  • Berbice Creole Dutch: tutu
  • Jersey Dutch: tut, tût
  • Negerhollands: tot, tee

Conjunction[edit]

tot

  1. until, till
    Ik kan niet wachten tot het hier ook weer gaat sneeuwen!I can't wait till it snows here as well!

Anagrams[edit]

German[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Middle High German tōt, from Old High German tōt (akin to Old Saxon dōd), from Proto-West Germanic *daud, from Proto-Germanic *daudaz. Compare Dutch dood, English dead, Danish død, Norwegian Nynorsk daud, Swedish död.

Pronunciation[edit]

Adjective[edit]

tot (strong nominative masculine singular toter, not comparable)

  1. dead, deceased

Declension[edit]

Derived terms[edit]

Related terms[edit]

Further reading[edit]

  • tot” in Duden online
  • tot” in Digitales Wörterbuch der deutschen Sprache

Italian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Unadapted borrowing from Latin tot.

Pronunciation[edit]

Adjective[edit]

tot (invariable)

  1. so many

Noun[edit]

tot m (invariable)

  1. so much

Latin[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Indo-European *toti, adverb from *só. Cognate with Sanskrit तति (táti), Ancient Greek τόσος (tósos).

Pronunciation[edit]

Determiner[edit]

tot (indeclinable)

  1. so many
    • 43 BCEc. 17 CE, Ovid, Fasti 2.229:
      Quid faciant paucī contrā tot mīlia fortēs?
      What can a few brave men do against so many thousands [of soldiers]?
      (Ovid here recounts the Battle of the Cremera.)

Derived terms[edit]

Related terms[edit]

References[edit]

  • tot”, in Charlton T. Lewis and Charles Short (1879) A Latin Dictionary, Oxford: Clarendon Press
  • tot”, in Charlton T. Lewis (1891) An Elementary Latin Dictionary, New York: Harper & Brothers
  • tot in Gaffiot, Félix (1934) Dictionnaire illustré latin-français, Hachette
  • Carl Meißner; Henry William Auden (1894) Latin Phrase-Book[3], London: Macmillan and Co.
    • many men, many minds: quot homines, tot sententiae
  • Sihler, Andrew L. (1995) New Comparative Grammar of Greek and Latin, Oxford, New York: Oxford University Press, →ISBN

Maranao[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Malayo-Polynesian *qətut (fart; flatulence), from Proto-Austronesian *qətut (fart; flatulence). Compare Thai ตด (dtòt) and Lao ຕົດ (tot).

Noun[edit]

tot

  1. fart, flatulence

Verb[edit]

tot

  1. to break wind, to fart

References[edit]

  • Howard P. McKaughan, Batua A. Macaraya (1967) A Maranao Dictionary[4] (in Maranao & English), University of Hawaii Press

Occitan[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old Occitan tot, from Vulgar Latin tōttus, alteration of Classical Latin tōtus.

Pronunciation[edit]

Adjective[edit]

tot m (feminine singular tota, masculine plural tots, feminine plural totas)

  1. all
  2. each, every
    Synonym: cada

Derived terms[edit]

Pronoun[edit]

tot

  1. everything

Derived terms[edit]

Old French[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Vulgar Latin tōttus, alteration of Latin tōtus.

Adjective[edit]

tot m (oblique and nominative feminine singular tote)

  1. all

Declension[edit]

Adverb[edit]

tot

  1. all; completely

Descendants[edit]

Old High German[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-West Germanic *daud, from Proto-Germanic *daudaz.

Adjective[edit]

tōt

  1. dead

Related terms[edit]

Descendants[edit]

  • Middle High German: tōt
    • Alemannic German:
    • Bavarian: doud
      Cimbrian: tòat
    • Central Franconian: dut, dot
      Hunsrik: dot
      Luxembourgish: dout
    • East Central German:
      Erzgebirgisch: duud
      Upper Saxon German:
    • East Franconian:
    • German: tot
    • Rhine Franconian: dut, dot
    • Yiddish: ⁧טויט(toyt)

Old Occitan[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin tōtus.

Adjective[edit]

tot (nominative singular tuih)

  1. all

Descendants[edit]

Romagnol[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Vulgar Latin tōttus, alteration of Latin tōtus.

Pronoun[edit]

tot

  1. everyone

Romanian[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

Inherited from Latin tōtus. Compare Aromanian tut, Catalan tot, French tout, Italian tutto, Portuguese todo, Spanish todo. First attested in the Hurmuzaki Psalter, dated to circa 1500–1510.

Adverb[edit]

tot

  1. (temporal) still
    Mai avem o oră și tot nu suntem gata.
    We have an hour left and we still aren’t ready.
    • 1682, Dosoftei, Viața și petreacerea svinților [Lives and deaths of the saints]‎[5], folio 36v (л҃ѕ); edited and transliterated in Rodica Frențiu, editor, Viața și petreacerea svinților[6], Cluj-Napoca: Echinox, 2002, →ISBN, page 44:
      Шѝ а҆ꙋѕѫ́н̾дь ꙟ҆пъра́ᲅꙋл꙽ къй ᲅѡ́ᲅ ві́ꙋ ѕѫ́сѫ лꙋй Гар꙽га́ль дарѫ ᲅѡ́ᲅꙋй ві́ꙋ ꙟ҆кѫ а҆че́ль фърмъкъᲅо́рю ;
      Și, audzînd împăratul că-i tot viu, dzîsă lui Gargal: "Dară totu-i viu încă acel fărmăcătoriu?"
      And the emperor, upon hearing that he’s still alive, said to Gargal: “Is that sorcerer still alive?”
    • 1837 June 24, Costache Negruzzi, “Fragment dintr-o călătorie [Fragment from a journey]”, in Albina Românească, supplement to Alăuta Românească[7], number 49, Iași, page 217; republished as “Scrisoarea 1 (Primblare) [Letter 1 (A wandering)]”, in Negru pe alb [Black on white], 1857:
      Бисерика Епископіей нꙋ съ деосъбеще прин алтъ дин челеланте де кѫт прин о клопотницъ де мꙋлцй анй ѫнчепꙋтъ ши тот ѫнчепꙋтъ.
      Biserica Episcopiei nu să deosebește prin altă din celelante de cât prin o clopotniță de mulți ani începută și tot începută.
      The church of the bishopry is not distinguished from any other in anything but a steeple begun many years ago and still begun.[sic – meaning unfinished]
    • 1921 April, Grigore Graur, “Îndrumarea medicală în alegerea meseriei [Medical counselling in selecting one’s job]”, in Arhiva pentru știința și reforma socială [Archive for science and social reform]‎[8], year 3, number 1, page 322:
      Publicul tot mai crede că datoria statului este numai să dea ajutoare bănești invalizilor, și atâta tot.
      The public still thinks that the state’s duty is only to grant monetary help to invalids, and nothing more.
    • 1984, Adrian Munțiu, Blazonul[9], Cluj: Editura Dacia, page 106:
      Desigur, pe la casele bogate tot se mai găsea.
      Of course, one could still find it in the houses of the rich.
    • 2019, Ela Negreanu, transl., Ceea ce nu poate fi ascuns [That which cannot be hidden]‎[10], Bucharest: Trei, translation of Une évidence by Agnès Martin-Lugand, →ISBN:
      La ora 21, Noé tot nu se întorsese.
      At 9 PM, Noé still hadn’t returned.
  2. nevertheless, still, anyway
    Nu aveam voie, dar tot m-am dus.
    I wasn’t allowed to, but still went.
    • 1643, Varlaam, Carte românească de învățătură[11], Iași, folio 152v (рн҃в):
      ꙟ҆трачѣѧ фъ́нтъ́нѫ ꙟ҆то́ци а҆́ии къте ѡ҆ да́тѫ ꙟ҆трꙋнь а҆́нь, съпогоръѧ̀ ꙟ҆́н̓џероуⷧ҇ лꙋи дн҃ѕъ́ꙋ детꙋрбꙋра̀ а҆́па. ши ка́ре ѡ҆м̾ врѣ ꙟ҆тра̀маи́н̾те,дꙋпъ ꙟ҆́нџерь . хїе дечѐ бо́алѫ врѣхѝ боⷧ҇нав̾ то́ть сътѫмѫдꙋѧ́ .
      Într-acea fântână în toți aii, câte o dată într-un an, să pogora îngerul lui Dumnezeu de turbura apa, și care om vrea întra mainte după înger, hie de ce boală vrea hi bolnav tot să tămăduia.
      In that well, in every year once a year, the angel of God would descend and disturb the water, and whichever man would go in after the angel, no matter what disease he’d suffer from, he’d be healed nevertheless.
    • 1875 October 1, Ion Creangă, “Soacra cu trei nurori [The mother-in-law with three daughters-in-law]”, in Convorbiri Literare[12], volume 9, number 7, page 285:
      „Soacră, soacră, poamă acră!
      „De te-ai coace, căt te-ai coace,
      „Dulce tot nu te’i mai face . . .“
      “Mother-in-law, mother-in-law, you sour fruit!
      Were you to ripen as much as you’d ripen,
      You still wouldn’t become sweet…”
    • 1921, Dumitru Cornilescu, transl., The Bible, Haggai 1:6:
      Sămănați mult, și strîngeți puțin, mîncați, și tot nu vă săturați, beți, și tot nu vă potoliți setea, vă îmbrăcați, și tot nu vă este cald; []
      Ye sow much, and gather little, ye eat, and still aren’t satiated, ye drink, and still quench not your thirst, ye dress up, and still aren’t warm; []
    • 1996, Mircea Cărtărescu, Orbitor [Blinding]‎[13], volume 1, Bucharest: Humanitas, →ISBN, page 157:
      Oricît de mult ar flutura drapelul în vînt, tot se zăresc, în colțul din stînga, sus, secera și ciocanul încrucișate savant.
      No matter how much the flag were to wave in the wind, the masterfully crossed hammer and sickle in the upper left corner can still be seen.
    1. (informal, in justifications) anyway (introduces circumstances favourable to the fulfillment of a request)
      Dacă tot n-avem ce căuta aici, hai să plecăm acasă.
      Since we have no business here anyway, let’s go home.
      • 1882, Petre Ispirescu (gatherer), “Înşir’te mărgăritarĭ”, in Legende sau basmele românilor[14], Bucharest: Romanian Academy, page 64:
        [] din eĭ să facĭ, din doĭ, doĕ scândurĭ la patŭ, că totŭ ne lipsesce câte-va scândurĭ.
        […din ei să faci, din doi, două scânduri la pat, că tot ne lipsesc câteva scânduri.]
        [] make from the two of them two bed boards, since we have a few boards missing anyway.
      • 1989, Pavel Pereș, Să ajungi înaintea răsăritului de soare [Arrive before sunrise]‎[15], Bucharest: Cartea Românească, →ISBN, page 18:
        ― Dacă tot crezi în cineva pe care nu l-ai întîlnit vreodată, de ce n-ai crede și în asta ?
        “Since you believe in someone you’ve never met anyway, why wouldn’t you also believe in this?”
  3. Indicates that a notion or quality is the same as one previously known.
    tot așa dejust as, to the same degree
    Tot eu sunt.It’s me again.
    • 1840, Descriere cu de-amănuntul asupra așezământului de cură cu apă rece [] [16], Bucharest: Saint Sava College, translation of original by Carol Munde, page 53:
      Кᲈрџереа апеĭ есtе tоt аша де гроасъ ка шi ачеа дела дᲈшеле бърбацiлор.
      Curgerea apei este tot așa de groasă ca și acea dela dușele bărbaților.
      The flow of the water is as intense as that of the men’s showers.
  4. (somewhat informal) repeatedly, unceasingly, all the time, habitually, constantly
    • c. 1744, Ion Neculce, chapter 83, in Letopisețul Țării Moldovei [Chronicle of the country of Moldova] (manuscript), folio 248v; as edited in Gabriel Ștrempel, editor, Opere [Works]‎[17], Bucharest: Minerva, 1982, page 310:
      Și s-au întorsu înapoi pe Bîrlad, tot vînînd vînaturi și pesșté.
      And they came back on the Bârlad river, hunting for game and fish all the time.
    • 1776, Bishop Chesarie, Mineiul pe luna lui octombrie[18], Râmnic, folio 160r, column 2, lines 34–37:
      [] непꙋтѫ́ндь до́фторїй ними́ка а҆й фолосѝ , шѝ бо́ала то́т ꙟ҆търи́ндꙋсе , нъꙁꙋѝ ла ᲃфн҃та Бесѣ́рикъ а҆ Мꙋчени́кꙋлꙋй []
      [] neputând doftorii nimica a-i folosi, și boala tot întărindu-se, năzui la sfânta Besearică a Mucenicului []
      [] with the doctors not being able to help him at all, and the disease constantly growing worse, he turnt to the holy Church of the Martyr []
    • 1823, Costache Negruzzi, Memnon (manuscript), translation of Memnon ou la Sagesse humaine by Voltaire; published and edited by Eugen Lovinescu in Convorbiri Literare, volume 45, issue 6, Bucharest, 1911, page 631:
      Măcar să mă tot cheme și să mă tot poftească,
      Prietenii la masa lor n’or să mă mai zărească.
      Let them repeatedly call me and repeatedly invite me,
      My friends won’t see me at their table anymore.
    • 1887, Barbu Ștefănescu Delavrancea, Trubadurul[19], Bucharest, pages 105–106:
      Sĕ cerc o novelă. Am subiect pe care ’l tot plib[sic] cu mine pe la băĭ, pe la țară, pe podul Mogoșoaiĭ; []
      Let me try a short story. I have a topic that I’m repeatedly taking with me to the baths, in the countryside, on the Mogoșoaia bridge; []
    • 1919, Lucian Blaga, Pietre pentru templul meu [Stones for my temple]‎[20], Sibiu, page 61:
      [] tot mergi și în cele din urmă te trezești iarăș, în locul de unde ai plecat . . .
      [] you’re continually going and in the end wake up again in the place you started from…
    • 1967, Mihai Beniuc, Folclor din Transilvania [Transylvanian folklore]‎[21], Bucharest: Editura pentru Literatură, page 169:
      De-ar ști omul ce-ar ajunge
      Tot ar suspina și-ar plînge
      Și-ar vărsa lacrimi de sînge.
      Should man know what’d become of him
      He’d unceasingly sigh and cry
      And shed tears of blood.
    • 2005, Liviu Oltean, Beți dintru acesta toți [Drink ye all of this]‎[22], Cluj: Eikon, →ISBN, pages 208–209:
      După aceasta, cam la două, trei luni tot eram chemat la miliție și mă tot acuzau de tot felul de lucruri pe care nici nu le făcusem și nici nu le vorbisem.
      After that, about every two or three months I’d repeatedly be called to the police station and they’d constantly accuse me of all manner of things I had neither done nor said.
  5. exclusively, only
    • 1643, Varlaam, Carte românească de învățătură[23], Iași, folio 228r (ск҃и):
      Ꙗ҆́рѫ сата́на ю҆бѣ́ще то́ть прече́и мъ́н꙽дри , къ є҆ль ꙗ҆́сте ꙟ҆пѫраⷮ тꙋторо́рь мъ́н꙽дрилорь .
      Iară satana iubeaște tot pre cei mândri, că el iaste împăratul tuturor mândrilor.
      And Satan loves the prideful only, for he is the emperor of all the prideful.
    • 1906, George Coșbuc, transl., Georgice (Biblioteca pentru toți), Bucharest: Alcalay, translation of Georgics by Virgil, part 3, line 386, page 108:
      Oile-apoile-alegi tot albe cu lâna țigae.
      Then choose sheep, all [of them] white and with silky wool.
  6. every (expressing periodicity)
    • 1774–1808, Gheorghe Șincai, Hronica românilor și a mai multor neamuri [Chronicle of the Romanians and other peoples]‎[24] (manuscript), published 1808, page 205; edited in Florea Fugariu, editor, Opere [Works], volume 2, Editura Pentru Literatură, 1969, page 205:
      [] са́ꙋ ѡ҆търи́т ꙟ҆трѫнса, ка нꙋ̀ нꙋ́май то́цй Мирѣ́ній дин А҆рдѣ́л, ка́рій пꙋтѣ̀ пꙋрта̀ а҆́рме, чѝ шѝ Пре́ѡцій се при́ндъ а҆́рме а҆сꙋ́пра Тꙋ́рчилѡр, а҆ша̀, кѫ́т то́т пентрꙋ до́аѡ са́те се ремѫ́нъ а҆ка́съ о҆у́н Пре́ѡт, []
      [] s-au otărât într-însa, ca nu numai toți Mirenii din Ardeal, carii putea purta arme, ci și Preoții să prindă arme asupra Turcilor, așa, cât tot pentru doao sate să remână acasă un Preot, []
      [] in it they decided that not only every arms-bearing layperson in Transylvania should take up arms against the Turks, but the priests as well, so that one priest remain home for every two villages.
    • 1907, Ion Agârbiceanu, “Scrisoare din Ardeal [Letter from Transylvania]”, in Nicolae Iorga, editor, Neamul Românesc[25], volume 2, number 33, Bucharest, page 517:
      [] ministrul Andrássy trimesese aicĭ 1.500 de baionete,—tot la doi alegătorĭ o suliță.
      [] minister Andrássy had sent here 1500 bayonets―one spear every two voters.
    • 1979 October 6, Pavel Suian, “Note de drum din R.D. Germană [Travel notes from the GDR]”, in Luceafărul[26], year 22, number 40, Bucharest, page 8:
      Dacă în Berlin, în 1970, tot al 7-lea muncitor a fost inovator, în 1975 tot al 4-lea muncitor a realizat o inovație, iar în 1977 tot al treilea om al muncii aducea ceva nou în perfecționarea activității, ridicarea calității și randamentului muncii.
      If in Berlin, in 1970, every seventh worker was an innovator, in 1975 every fourth worker made an innovation, and in 1977 every third working man came up with something new pertaining to improvement of activity, raising of quality and yield of work.
    • 2016, chapter 5, in Alina Simuț, transl., Surori în luna de miere[27], Bucharest: Corint Junior, translation of The Honeymoon Sisters by Gwyneth Rees, →ISBN:
      Dar, după cum am explicat, din moment ce eu petrec tot al doilea și al treilea sfârșit de săptămână acasă la tata, îmi dau seama de ce el nu vrea să irosească tot acel spațiu.
      But, as I explained, seeing that I spend every second and third weekend at my dad’s, I realise why he doesn’t want to waste all that space.
  7. (modifying mai) increasingly (yielding more and more, ever more)
    • 1643, Varlaam, Carte românească de învățătură[28], Iași, folio 284r (сп҃д):
      ꙗ҆́рѫ є҆́и то́ть маи ꙟ҆рѫ́ꙋ мерџѣ̀. демꙋнчїѧ̀ ши ᲂу҆чид̀ѣ прече́ѧ че кред̀ѣ ꙟ҆х҃с.
      Iară ei tot mai în rău mergea, de muncea și ucidea pre ceia ce credea în Hristos.
      And they were becoming increasingly worse, so much that they would torture and kill those who believed in Christ.
    • 1883, Mihai Eminescu, “De-or trece anii…”, in Poesii [Poems]‎[29], Bucharest: Socec, page 159, lines 1–2:
      De-ori trece anii cum trecură,
      Ea tot mai mult im va plăcè, []
      Should the years pass as they have passed,
      I shall like her increasingly more, []
    • 1912, Liviu Rebreanu, “Dintele [The tooth]”, in Frământări [Worries]‎[30], Orăștie: Editura Națională, page 10:
      Dăscălița Aglaia o privì dintru’ntâiu necăjită, apoi clipă cu clipă tot mai înseninată.
      Teacher Aglaia looked at her dejectedly at first, then more and more serenely every moment.
  8. (informal, modifying verb in subjunctive, slightly dated) let’s say, approximately, about
    • 1893, Anton Bacalbașa, “Un rond sever [A severe inspection]”, in Moș Teacă[31], Bucharest, archived from the original on 26 July 2023, page 54:
      tot fi fost mĭezul nopțiĭ, ora crimelor și a misterelor, cînd umbra ronduluĭ se arată ’n fața santineliĭ adormite.
      It was, let’s say, midnight, the hour of crimes and mysteries, when the shadow of the inspector appeared before the sleeping sentry.
    • 1953, George Călinescu, chapter 2, in Bietul Ioanide [Poor Ioanide]; reedited in Opere[32], volume 5, Bucharest: Editura pentru Literatură, 1967, page 60:
      ― Măi Ioanide, tu trebuie să fii destul de în vîrstă acum! Cîți ani să tot ai? Stai să vedem.
      “Ioanide, you must be quite advanced in age by now! How old must you be? Let’s see.”
    • 2001, Ioan Victor Pica, Călăuza pustiurilor [The guide in the wastelands], Bistrița: Aletheia, →ISBN, page 247:
      Din clipa desfacerii lăzii și până la anunțul dramatic “s-a terminat”, să fi tot luat unt vreo treizeci de persoane.
      From the moment the crate was opened until the dramatic announcement “it’s gone”, about thirty people must’ve taken butter.
Usage notes[edit]

In the first sense, tot is succeeded by mai when modifying a verb that is not negated.

  • (file)
  • (file)

Senses 1–3 are distinguished with a high pitch and are unstressed; the latter senses take a normal pitch and are relatively stressed. These contrast in a sentence like “tot mă duc”, which may either mean “I’m habitually/repeatedly/constantly going” or “I’m going anyway”. Sense 2.1 also takes a low pitch, despite being a subsense of a high pitched one.

In both the sense of “repeatedly, habitually” and the sense of “either way”, tot must stand right before the verb it modifies, but, in case of a reflexive verb, the latter cannot stand between the verb and the reflexive pronoun. Consequently, “mă tot duc” can only mean “I’m going habitually”.

In older popular narratives and especially fairy tales, tot in the sense of “repeatedly” is used with no precise meaning, modifying verbs such as pleca (leave) or se duce (go).

Synonyms[edit]
Derived terms[edit]
Collocations[edit]
  • tot înainteforwards

Determiner[edit]

tot m or n (feminine singular toată, masculine plural toți, feminine and neuter plural toate)

  1. all, the whole
    • 1581–1582, Palia de la Orăștie (manuscript); edited in Viorica Pamfil, editor, Palia de la Orăștie. 1581–1582. Text—Facsimile—Indice[33], Bucharest: Academy of the Socialist Republic of Romania, 1968, page 144:
      ши мергѫндь а҆фа́рѫ де́ла Фа́раѡ҆́нь ꙟмблѫ то́ть пъмѫнтоуⷧ Є҆ги́петꙋлꙋи .
      Și mergând afară de la Faraon îmblă tot pământul Eghipetului.
      And Joseph went out from the presence of Pharaoh, and went throughout all the land of Egypt. (Genesis 41:46)
    • 1840, Ion Heliade Rădulescu, transl., Don Quichotte[34], volume 2, Bucharest, translation of Don Quixote by Miguel de Cervantes, archived from the original on 19 August 2023, page 329:
      Îĭ аскᲈnсе тот плаnᲈл съᲈ̆ []
      He had hid his entire plan from him []
    • 1876, Ion Creangă, Povestea porcului:
      În sfârșit, s-a hotărât a se duce în toată lumea, să-și caute bărbatul.
      In the end, she decided to go out in the entire world to search for her man.
    • 1928, Panait Istrati, Ciulinii Bărăganului:
      Am aflat curând toată povestea []
      I soon found out the whole story []
    • 1972, Anuarul Observatorului din București [Yearly of the Bucharest Observatory], Bucharest: Academy of the Socialist Republic of Romania, page 92:
      Uranus se află tot anul în constelația Fecioara.
      Uranus is in Virgo all year.
    • 2016, Carmen Pațac, transl., Jurnalul lui Adam și al Evei[35] (ebook), Litera, translation of The Diaries of Adam and Eve by Mark Twain, →ISBN:
      După o săptămână am înțeles și noi că toată treaba cu-ntrerupătorul era o păcăleală și-o capcană.
      After a week we finally understood that the whole thing about the switch was a sham and a trap.
  2. (in the plural) all, every [from c. 1500–1510]
    • 1521, Neacșu’s letter, lines 6–7:
      ипаⷦ҇ сьщїи кьбагь денᲅоᲅѐ·ѡ҆́рашеле·кьᲅе·м҇·деѡмиⷩ҇·сьѧ
      фїе ꙟнажꙋᲅоⷬ·ꙟкорабїи
      I pak să știi că bagă den tote orașele câte 50 de oamini să <ia>
      fie în ajutor în corabii.

      Then, know that they are enlisting fifty people each from all towns to help on the ships.
    • 1673, Dosoftei, Psaltirea în versuri [Metrical psalter]‎[36], Iași, folio 9r (ѳ҃):
      Те​воⷬ҇ ꙟⷩ҇ кꙋн꙽ џꙋра́те[sic] нъроа́де де​глоа́те,
       Ка́риле цай[sic] цѫнꙋ́тꙋц꙽ порꙋ́нчиле тоа́те.
      Te vor încungiura-te năroade de gloate,
       Carile ț-au țânutu-ți poruncile toate.
      Congregations of people shall surround you,
       Which have kept all your commandments. (Psalm 7:7)
    • 1714, Antim the Iberian, Capete de poruncă la toată ceata besericească[37], folio 11v:
      а҆ши́ждерѣ мъ рѡ́гь шѝ тꙋтꙋрѡ́рь Крещи́нилѡрь кꙋ́й че́вою фѝ греши́ть ᲃъмъ ꙗ҆́рте:
      Așijderea mă rog și tuturor Creștinilor cui ce voiu fi greșit să mă iarte.
      Likewise I ask all Christians to forgive me whatever I might have wronged them with.
    • 1838, Ioan Albineț, Macroviotica[38], Iași, translation of original by Joseph Friedrich Sobernheim, page 198:
      Ла лꙋкрарѣ де сѣръ съ пот рекомендꙋі маі̆ кꙋ самъ лампеле, пентрꙋ къ еле ꙟмпръщіе ꙟн тоате пърціле о деопотрівъ лꙋмінъ.
      La lucrarea de seară să pot recomendui mai cu samă lampele, pentru că ele împrăștie în toate părțile o deopotriva lumină.
      For evening work, lamps are especially recommended, as they spread an equal light in all directions.
    • 1946, Lucian Blaga, Hronicul și cântecul vârstelor [Chronicle and song of the ages], 4th edition, Bucharest: Minerva, published 1990, →ISBN, page 174:
      Manifestul era adresat tuturor popoarelor din monarhie, numai nouă, românilor, nu.
      The manifesto was addressed to all of the peoples of the Monarchy, except for us, the Romanians.
    • 1985 February, Aneta Dumitriu, Femeia[39], year 38, number 2, page 7:
      Sînt chemați toți specialiștii, toți pricepuții.
      All the specialists, all the skilled are called in.
  3. (with singular countable nouns or relative pronouns; archaic, regional or colloquial) every
    în tot loculall over the place
    tot felulall kinds
    • c. 1500–1510, Hurmuzaki Psalter, folio 125r, lines 23–24; edited in Ion Gheție, Mirela Teodorescu, editors, Psaltirea Hurmuzaki, volume I, Bucharest: Romanian Academy Press, 2005:
      ᲅоаᲅъ​дыханїа​се​лаоуде​дѡ́мнꙋлъ:⁓
      Toată dihania se laude Domnul.
      Let every thing that hath breath praise the Lord. (Psalm 150:6)
    • 1648, New Testament of Bălgrad[40], Alba Iulia, folio 117r (рꙁ҃ї), lines 8–9:
      Ръспꙋ́нсе Іᲃ҃ ло́р, а҆девъ́р а҆́девъ́р гръе́скꙋ во́аѡ, къ̀ то́т̾ чи́не фа́че пъка́ть ро́бь ꙗ҆́сте пъка́тꙋлꙋи.
      Răspunse Is[us] lor, adevăr adevăr grăesc voao, că tot cine face păcat rob iaste păcatului.
      Jesus answered them, Verily, verily, I say unto you, Whosoever committeth sin is the servant of sin. (John 8:34)
    • 1856, Dimitrie Bolintineanu, Călĕtoriĭ la Ierusalim în serbătorile Pascelui şi în Egiptŭ [Journeys to Jerusalem during Easter and to Egypt]‎[41], 2nd edition, Bucharest, published 1867, page 96:
      În ajunul Epifanieĭ, în tot anul, venéŭ aicĭ mulţime de chreştinĭ.
      On the day before Epiphany, each year, a multitude of Christians would come here.
    • 1940 February 4, Victor Popovici, “Întâmpinarea Domnului [Welcoming the Lord]”, in Foaia Diecezană [Newsletter of the Diocese]‎[42], year 55, number 5, Caransebeș, page 3:
      Prescris era în legea veche, că toată femeia la patruzeci de zile după naștere să se ducă cu copilul la sfânta biserică și să ducă și jertfă.
      In the old law it was prescribed that every woman go to the holy church forty days after giving birth, and to bring a sacrifice as well.
    • 2012 July 27, Diana Răileanu, quoting a Moldovan peasant, “Țări mai mici, mai puțin dezvoltate ca noi au irigare…”, in Radio Free Europe Moldova[43]:
      Începând chiar cu porumbul, la care tot țăranul trăgea nădejde că o să hrănească o vită, e la zero.
      The maize, to begin with, with which every peasant would hope to feed a cow—it’s nil.
  4. (mostly used of bodies; preposited or postposited) all over
    • 1866, Vasile Alecsandri (gatherer), “Erculean”, in Poesii populare ale românilor[44], Bucharest, page 15:
      ― Cum se es din peatră
      Că sunt gólă tótă
      Şi mĕ tem de sóre…
      [―Cum să ies din piatră
      Că sunt goală toată
      Și mă tem de soare…]
      “How can I get out from the stone
      When I’m all naked
      And fear the sun…”
    • 1916, Henric Sanielevici, Icoane fugare: documente omenești [Ephemeral icons: human documents]‎[45], Bucharest: Socec, page 11:
      Da-i udă toată și ni strică hainele!
      But it’s all wet and it spoils our clothes!
    • 1980, Alfred Neagu, transl., Insulele lui Thomas Hudson[46], Univers, translation of Islands in the Stream by Ernest Hemingway, page 459:
      Willie se arătă pe puntea de comandă, încă tot umflat de la înțepăturile de țînțari.
      Willie showed up on the control deck, still swollen all over from the mosquito stings.
    • 1990, Miodrag Milin, Timișoara, 15–21 decembrie ’89[47], Timișoara, page 108:
      Adrian era tot murdar, cu o vînătaie urîtă sub ochi.
      Adrian was all dirty, with an ugly bruise under an eye.
Usage notes[edit]

The singular genitive case is not used; the word întreg is substituted. Nonstandard usage is, however, encountered in old texts:

1829, contract (manuscript); published in I. Cojocaru, editor, Documente privitoare la economia Țării Românești. 1800-1850 [Documents concerning the economy of Wallachia], volume 1, Bucharest: Editura Științifică, 1958, page 443:
Și pentru săvârșirea a tot lucrului, să-mi dea taleri patruzeci și cinci de mii []
And, for completion of the entire matter, let him give me forty five thousand thalers []

Tot is only ever found in articulated constructions, but it is never articulated itself, even (as Romanian grammar otherwise dictates) when placed before the noun. This preposited usage is most neutral in style and fits any register.

While singular tot (sense 1) is not markedly informal, it is especially in elevated writing that it is replaced by its synonym întreg, particularly when modifying countable nouns.

Declension[edit]
Synonyms[edit]
Derived terms[edit]

Noun[edit]

tot n (uncountable)

  1. a totality, whole [from 1836]
    Synonyms: întreg, unitate
    un tot unitara unified whole
    • 1836, Gheorghe Asachi, Aritmetica[48], volume 1, Iași: Tipografia Albinei, page 50:
      Кꙋ пꙋтинцъ есте а ꙟмпърци ꙋн тотꙋл (лꙋкрꙋ ꙟнтрег) ꙟ атѫте пърцй кѫте вом вои.
      Cu putință este a împărți un totul (lucru întreg) în atâte părți câte vom voi.
      It is possible to divide a whole (an entire thing) into as many parts as we want.
    • 1951, Mihai Băcescu, Fauna Republicii Populare Române, volume 4, part 1, Bucharest: Romanian Academy, page 63:
      Carapacea scurtă și groasă, cu 3 pliuri pe laturi, formează împreună cu toracele un tot umflat, net deosebit de abdomenul subțire, cilindric.
      The short and thick shell, with 3 indentations on the sides, forms, together with the thorax, a swollen whole, visibly distinct from the thin, cylindrical abdomen.
    • 1987 April 23, Aurel Papadiuc, Cezar Ioana, Scânteia[49], number 13894, Bucharest, page 3:
      Este dificil de sintetizat în cîteva rînduri activitatea acestui combinat, ce cuprinde 75 de unități de producție de bază și auxiliare, în care lucrează peste 10 000 de oameni și care funcționează ca un tot unitar, continuu, ritmic și constant pe tot parcursul anului.
      It is difficult to synthesise in a few lines the activity of this combine, which encompasses 75 base and auxiliary production units, in which work over 10000 people and which functions as a unified whole, continually, rhythmically and constantly the whole year.
  2. (articulated, only as nominal predicate) everything (the crucial part, the crux)
Declension[edit]

Pronoun[edit]

tot

  1. everything
    Tot ce faci contează.Everything you do matters.
  2. everyone
    Vă mulțumesc tuturor.I thank you all.
Declension[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

Noun[edit]

tot m (plural toți) (Transylvania)

  1. Alternative form of tăut (Slovak)

References[edit]

Romansch[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

  • tut (Rumantsch Grischun, Sursilvan, Sutsilvan)
  • tuot (Puter, Vallader)

Etymology[edit]

From Vulgar Latin tōttus, alteration of Latin tōtus.

Adverb[edit]

tot

  1. (Surmiran) all

Walloon[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old French tot, from Vulgar Latin tōttus, alteration of Latin tōtus.

Pronunciation[edit]

Adjective[edit]

tot

  1. all

Wastek[edit]

Noun[edit]

tot

  1. turkey vulture

References[edit]