dood

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See also: Dood

English[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

Back-formation from dudhwallah, doodwallah (milk-man, literally milk-ward), reinterpreting the wallah of milk as a wallah of camels by dint of misremembrance of the Bengali word for “camel” which is উট (uṭ).

Noun[edit]

dood (plural doods)

  1. A riding camel or dromedary.
    • 1860, William Howard Russell, My Diary in India, in the Year 1858–9, volume 2, London: Routledge, Warne and Routledge, page 25:
      The Chief was lying down beside my dooly, aking a nap while his tent was being prepared, with his head resting on his hand, for he refused to accept the loan of my pillow, when a camel-driver came by, leading a huge dood so carelessly as to bring him right across Sir Colin.
    • 1892, George Manville Fenn, Gil the Gummer, Or, The Youngest Officer in the East, Society for Promoting Christian Knowledge, page 42:
      “I have never seen it,” he replied, “but I have seen them attack a dood.”
      “What is a dood?”
      “A camel; one of a troop fording the river.”

Etymology 2[edit]

Noun[edit]

dood (plural doods or doodz)

  1. Eye dialect spelling of dude.
    • 1884 August, “The Boston Dude”, in Brotherhood of Locomotive Engineer's Monthly Journal, volume 18, number 8:
      "Talk about yer doods," said a Texas stockman, on the Chicago, Burlington and Quincy train last night, "but a leetle the doodest dood I ever seen wuz a feller that come down from Boston into our kentry a year ago las' September."
    • 1888 November 17, “The Cook's Soliloquy”, in Time, volume 8, number 223, page 7:
      An' now Oi suppose if Oi don't get thim rolls riddy fer der brikfus' av that small dood that comes ter see Alice, Oi'll niver hear der end av it. Wot do Oi kee-ur? If he gives me a quarter whin he goes, it's more'n he'll do, fer all he's a dood an' all.
    • 1925, Collier's - Volume 76, page 34:
      On the dood ranch the dweller from the city can renew his almost forgotten ambition to be one with the rider of the Western plains --the cowpuncher, the Indian fighter, the pony express rider, the buffalo hunter, the scout.
Related terms[edit]

Anagrams[edit]


Afrikaans[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Dutch dood, from Middle Dutch dôot, from Old Dutch dōt, from Proto-West Germanic *daud, from Proto-Germanic *daudaz.

Adjective[edit]

dood (attributive dooie, comparative dooier, superlative doodste or dooiste)

  1. dead
  2. (figuratively) exhausted; listless; fatigued
Derived terms[edit]

Adverb[edit]

dood

  1. dead
  2. (figuratively) exhausted; listless; fatigued
    Hy het gister dood aangekom.
    Yesterday, he arrived exhausted.

Etymology 2[edit]

From Dutch dood, from Middle Dutch dôot, from Old Dutch dōth, from Proto-West Germanic *dauþu, from Proto-Germanic *dauþuz.

Noun[edit]

dood (uncountable)

  1. death; the act of dying
  2. the dead; something that is no longer alive
  3. (figuratively) a complete loss
Derived terms[edit]

Etymology 3[edit]

From Dutch doden, from Middle Dutch dôden, from Old Dutch *dōden, from Proto-West Germanic *daudijan, from Proto-Germanic *daudijaną.

Verb[edit]

dood (present dood, present participle dodende, past participle gedood)

  1. (transitive) to kill
  2. (transitive) to end permanently
Derived terms[edit]

Dutch[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /doːt/
  • (file)
  • Hyphenation: dood
  • Rhymes: -oːt

Etymology 1[edit]

From Middle Dutch dôot, doet, from Old Dutch dōt, from Proto-West Germanic *daud, from Proto-Germanic *daudaz. Compare West Frisian dead, German tot, English dead, Danish død.

Adjective[edit]

dood (comparative doder, superlative doodst)

  1. dead
Inflection[edit]
Inflection of dood
uninflected dood
inflected dode
comparative doder
positive comparative superlative
predicative/adverbial dood doder het doodst
het doodste
indefinite m./f. sing. dode dodere doodste
n. sing. dood doder doodste
plural dode dodere doodste
definite dode dodere doodste
partitive doods doders
Derived terms[edit]
Descendants[edit]
  • Afrikaans: dood

Adverb[edit]

dood

  1. (colloquial, East and West Flanders) A lot.

Etymology 2[edit]

From Middle Dutch dôot, doet, from Old Dutch dōth, dōt, from Proto-West Germanic *dauþu, from Proto-Germanic *dauþuz. Compare West Frisian dead, German Tod, English death, Danish død.

Noun[edit]

dood m (uncountable)

  1. death
Derived terms[edit]
Descendants[edit]

Etymology 3[edit]

From doden.

Verb[edit]

dood

  1. first-person singular present indicative of doden
  2. imperative of doden

Anagrams[edit]


Saterland Frisian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old Frisian dād, from Proto-West Germanic *daud, from Proto-Germanic *daudaz.

Adjective[edit]

dood

  1. dead

Somali[edit]

Verb[edit]

dood

  1. to debate; to dispute