doot

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See also: Doot

English[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

Verb[edit]

doot

  1. (chiefly Scotland) doubt
    • 1902, Jack London, A Daughter of the Snows[1]:
      "Mair'd be a bother; an' I doot not ye'll mak' it all richt, lad."
  2. (chiefly Scotland) think
    • 1920, James C. Welsh, The Underworld[2]:
      Andrew knew that Geordie would not have had a smoke for a long time, and this was his way of leaving him with a pipeful of tobacco.
      "I think my pipe's on the mantelshelf," returned Geordie, "but I doot it's empty."
      Andrew took down the pipe, filled it generously []

Noun[edit]

doot (plural doots)

  1. (chiefly Scotland) doubt
    • 1917, John Hay Beith, All In It: K(1) Carries On[3]:
      No doot he'll try to pass himself off as an officer, for to get better quarters!"

Etymology 2[edit]

Onomatopoeic, from Cantonese (dut1).

Verb[edit]

doot (third-person singular simple present doots, present participle dooting, simple past and past participle dooted)

  1. (Hong Kong) to tap a card
    • 2006 July 6, Andrew Sun, “Thursday Think Tank”, in South China Morning Post[4]:
      Macau and Shenzhen will soon accept Octopus cards ...it'll be convenient at Lowu, but it won't quite be the same to 'doot' your card at the Lisboa's craps table.
    • 2009 September 17, “Always Coca Cola...”, in South China Morning Post[5]:
      I had dragged myself to one of those exclusive vending machines (1/F, Windsor House); I dooted my Octopus card; I waited with anticipation; and then I finally dove in with faith.
  2. (Hong Kong) to scan
    • 2015 May 22, “What is your ideal summer job?”, in SCMP Young Post[6]:
      I'd like to work as a cashier in a supermarket. It has been my dream since childhood to "doot" things.
    • 2022 December 14, Robert Chung, Twitter[7]:
      On no more doot doot day...
      Record temperature with a record time on a dootless day: 14C in water for 500 butt using 15m54s on this special day with a little bit more freedom than one day before.

Noun[edit]

doot (plural doots)

  1. (Hong Kong) beep (electronically-produced tone)
    • 2011 September 29, “Octopus expands into worthy causes”, in South China Morning Post[8], archived from the original on 2021-07-29:
      In a landmark deal between Octopus Cards and the Hong Kong Council of Social Services, up to 30 charities could be giving you a doot as well as a thank you when you shell out to help the needy.
    • 2015 June 16, u/themdreamers, r/Hong Kong[9]:
      This card is used for almost all forms of public transportation in Hong Kong, and is also accepted is basically any major chain store, restaurant, fast food chain, etc. Just tap the card/your wallet to the reader, and wait for the doot sound, at which point it will flash your remaining balance on the screen.
    • 2017 March 1, “Let’s stop thinking of 65 as the benchmark age of retirement”, in South China Morning Post[10], archived from the original on 2017-03-01:
      No, mine is the sort of green card that says “Deet!” instead of “Doot!” when I press it on the Octopus card reader on the bus. It then reduces my fare to HK$2.

Anagrams[edit]


Bau Bidayuh[edit]

Noun[edit]

doot

  1. wild boar (Sus scrofa)

Synonyms[edit]


Cua[edit]

Noun[edit]

doot

  1. mountain

References[edit]


German Low German[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Middle Low German dôt, from Old Saxon dōd, from Proto-West Germanic *daud, from Proto-Germanic *daudaz. Compare Dutch dood, German tot, English dead, Danish død.

Adjective[edit]

doot (comparative döder, superlative döödst)

  1. dead

Declension[edit]


Middle Dutch[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Old Dutch dōt, from Proto-West Germanic *daud, from Proto-Germanic *daudaz.

Adjective[edit]

dôot

  1. dead
  2. lifeless
  3. invalid, void
Inflection[edit]
Adjective
Masculine Feminine Neuter Plural
Nominative Indefinite dôot dôde dôot dôde
Definite dôde dôde
Accusative Indefinite dôden dôde dôot dôde
Definite dôde
Genitive dôots dôder dôots dôder
Dative dôden dôder dôden dôden
Descendants[edit]
  • Dutch: dood
  • Limburgish: doead

Etymology 2[edit]

From Old Dutch dōth, from Proto-West Germanic *dauþu, from Proto-Germanic *dauþuz.

Noun[edit]

dôot m or f

  1. death
  2. death penalty
Inflection[edit]

This noun needs an inflection-table template.

Descendants[edit]

Further reading[edit]


Plautdietsch[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Middle Low German dôt, from Old Saxon dōd, from Proto-West Germanic *daud, from Proto-Germanic *daudaz.

Adjective[edit]

doot

  1. dead, lifeless, deceased