idem

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See also: Idem, IDEM, and ídem

English[edit]

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Etymology[edit]

From Latin idem ‎(the same).

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /ˈaɪ.dɛm/, /ˈɪ.dɛm/

Adjective[edit]

idem ‎(not comparable)

  1. The same.

Derived terms[edit]

Usage notes[edit]

  • Used almost exclusively in footnotes of academic or scholarly papers, especially those of the legal profession, to indicate that the source referred to in a footnote is the same as the source in the preceding footnote; usually abbreviated when so used.

Anagrams[edit]


Dutch[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Adverb[edit]

idem

  1. idem, ditto

Anagrams[edit]


French[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Adverb[edit]

idem

  1. idem, likewise

Anagrams[edit]

External links[edit]


Italian[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /ˈidem/
  • Hyphenation: ì‧dem

Adverb[edit]

idem

  1. ditto, and so, likewise, also

Pronoun[edit]

idem

  1. ditto, the same

Anagrams[edit]


Latin[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From the pronoun is ‎(he) + Proto-Italic *-im ‎(emphatic marker) (whence Sabellic *-om, Oscan 𐌝𐌔𐌝𐌃𐌖𐌌 ‎(ísídum), 𐌄𐌔𐌝𐌃𐌖𐌌 ‎(esídum)), from Proto-Indo-European *im (whence also Old Latin im, em), accusative singular of *éy. The s was lost and the i lengthened by compensatory lengthening.[2]

When the ablative cases eōd, eād became , , the true forms eōd-em, eād-em were interpreted as eō-dem, eā-dem. The neuter nominative singular id-em is natural and gives earlier emem (= later eundem). The new marker -dem then served to create totidem, tantumdem, ibīdem, etc. Compare tam-en with its later doublet: tan-dem.

Determiner[edit]

īdem m ‎(feminine eadem, neuter idem)

  1. the same (usually with ablative)
    • 29 bc. Vergil. Georgics, III
      amor omnibvs idem
      Sex is the same for all of them [viz., every form of man, beast, aquatic or winged life, and livestock]

Inflection[edit]

Irregular declension. Similar to the declension of is, ea, id. Irregular: similar to first and second declensions, except for singular genitives ending in "-ius" and singular datives ending in "-ī".
Irregular: similar to first and second declensions, except for singular genitives ending in "-ius" and singular datives ending in "-ī".

Number Singular Plural
Case / Gender Masculine Feminine Neuter Masculine Feminine Neuter
nominative īdem eadem idem īdem eaedem eadem
genitive eiusdem /
ejusdem
eōrundem eārundem eōrundem
dative eīdem eīsdem /
īsdem
accusative eundem eandem idem eōsdem eāsdem eadem
ablative eōdem eādem eōdem eīsdem /
īsdem


See also[edit]

References[edit]

  • idem in Charlton T. Lewis & Charles Short (1879) A Latin Dictionary, Oxford: Clarendon Press
  • idem in Charlton T. Lewis (1891) An Elementary Latin Dictionary, New York: Harper & Brothers
  • idem” in Félix Gaffiot (1934), Dictionnaire Illustré Latin-Français, Paris: Hachette.
  • Meissner, Carl; Auden, Henry William (1894) Latin Phrase-Book[1], London: Macmillan and Co.
    • to hold the same views: idem sentire (opp. dissentire ab aliquo)
    • to agree with a person: consentire, idem sentire cum aliquo
    • to have the same meaning: idem valere, significare, declarare
    • synonyms: vocabula idem fere declarantia
    • to have the same political opinions: idem de re publica sentire
  • Sihler, Andrew L. (1995) New Comparative Grammar of Greek and Latin, Oxford, New York: Oxford University Press
  1. ^ idem in Charlton T. Lewis & Charles Short (1879) A Latin Dictionary, Oxford: Clarendon Press
  2. ^ De Vaan, Michiel (2008), “-dem”, in Etymological Dictionary of Latin and the other Italic Languages (Leiden Indo-European Etymological Dictionary Series; 7), Leiden, Boston: Brill, page 166

Portuguese[edit]

Pronoun[edit]

idem

  1. (demonstrative) the aforesaid; ditto

Serbo-Croatian[edit]

Verb[edit]

idem (Cyrillic spelling идем)

  1. first-person singular present tense form of ići.