iste

Definition from Wiktionary, the free dictionary
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See also: isté, işte, -iste, -ište, and -iště

Aragonese[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin iste (that). Cognate to Spanish este (this)

Determiner[edit]

iste

  1. this

Danish[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From is (ice) +‎ te (tea).

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

iste c (singular definite isteen, not used in plural form)

  1. iced tea

Further reading[edit]


Estonian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

(This etymology is missing or incomplete. Please add to it, or discuss it at the Etymology scriptorium.) Related to istuma.

Noun[edit]

iste (genitive [please provide], partitive [please provide])

  1. seat

Declension[edit]

This noun needs an inflection-table template.


Interlingua[edit]

Determiner[edit]

iste

  1. (demonstrative) this; these

Latin[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From is + -te, from Proto-Indo-European *só, with only the second part declining. Cognate with Lepontic 𐌉𐌑𐌏𐌔 (iśos) and Albanian ashtu. See also Latin tum, tam.

Pronunciation[edit]

Determiner[edit]

iste (feminine ista, neuter istud); demonstrative pronoun (pronominal)

  1. (determiner) that (near you); those (in the plural)
  2. (pronoun) that one (near you); that (thing); those ones (in the plural); those (things); he, she, it

Declension[edit]

Demonstrative pronoun (pronominal).

Number Singular Plural
Case / Gender Masculine Feminine Neuter Masculine Feminine Neuter
Nominative iste ista istud istī istae ista
Genitive istīus istōrum istārum istōrum
Dative istī istīs
Accusative istum istam istud istōs istās ista
Ablative istō istā istō istīs

Usage notes[edit]

  • This demonstrative determiner/pronoun is used to refer to a person or thing, or persons or things, near the listener. It contrasts with hic (this), which refers to people or things near the speaker, and ille (that), which refers to people or things far from both speaker and listener.
  • As Latin had no person pronouns specifically meaning "he", "she" or "it", any of ille, iste, hic or (most frequently) is could assume that function.
  • In Classical usage, iste frequently has a secondary, pejorative function of casting the referent in a negative light; for example, iste homō tends to mean "that (infamous/no good) man". This is opposite to ille, which is often used to cast the referent in a positive light. For example:
  1. "Iste," inquit, "sceleribus suis tollētur."
    "That man," he said, "will be taken away for his crimes."
  • For this reason, iste is often avoided in Classical usage as a neutral demonstrative. However, the pejorative function was missing or disappeared in Vulgar Latin, where iste was frequently used as a simple demonstrative and eventually came to replace hoc in the meaning "this" (cf. Spanish este), sometimes strengthened with ecce (cf. French cet from Old French cist) or with eccum (cf. Italian questo).

Derived terms[edit]

Related terms[edit]

Descendants[edit]

From eccu (from eccum, from ecce eum) + iste

See also[edit]

References[edit]


Norwegian Bokmål[edit]

Norwegian Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia no

Etymology[edit]

From is +‎ te

Noun[edit]

iste m (definite singular isteen, uncountable)

  1. iced tea

References[edit]


Norwegian Nynorsk[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From is +‎ te

Noun[edit]

iste m (definite singular isteen, uncountable)

  1. iced tea

Serbo-Croatian[edit]

Adjective[edit]

iste

  1. inflection of isti:
    1. feminine genitive singular
    2. feminine nominative/accusative/vocative plural
    3. masculine accusative plural

Turkish[edit]

Noun[edit]

iste

  1. locative singular of is

Verb[edit]

iste

  1. second-person singular imperative of istemek