these

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See also: These and thèse

English[edit]

English Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia

Etymology[edit]

Middle English thes, from Old English þas, from Proto-Germanic.

Pronunciation[edit]

Determiner[edit]

these

  1. plural of this

Note: depending on the context, the word those may be used either in place of or interchangeably with these.

Translations[edit]

The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables, removing any numbers. Numbers do not necessarily match those in definitions. See instructions at Wiktionary:Entry layout#Translations.

Pronoun[edit]

these

  1. plural of this

Translations[edit]

The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables, removing any numbers. Numbers do not necessarily match those in definitions. See instructions at Wiktionary:Entry layout#Translations.

Anagrams[edit]


Dutch[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Borrowed from French thèse, from Latin thēsis, from Ancient Greek θέσις (thésis).

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

these f (plural theses or thesen)

  1. statement, thesis, proposition
    Synonym: stelling

Latin[edit]

Noun[edit]

these

  1. ablative singular of thesis

Old Dutch[edit]

Etymology[edit]

EB1911 - Volume 01 - Page 001 - 1.svg This entry lacks etymological information. If you are familiar with the origin of this term, please add it to the page per etymology instructions, or discuss it at the Etymology scriptorium.

Determiner[edit]

these

  1. this, these

Inflection[edit]


Descendants[edit]

Further reading[edit]

  • these”, in Oudnederlands Woordenboek, 2012

Old Saxon[edit]

Determiner[edit]

these m

  1. this, these
    an thesum uueroldrīkea uuirkean scoldin: They should work on this world.

Declension[edit]


Descendants[edit]


Portuguese[edit]

Noun[edit]

these f (plural theses)

  1. Obsolete spelling of tese (used in Portugal until September 1911 and died out in Brazil during the 1920s).