proposition

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See also: Proposition

English[edit]

English Wikipedia has articles on:
Wikipedia

Etymology[edit]

From Middle English proposicioun, from Old French proposicion, from Latin prōpositiō(n-) (a proposing, design, theme, case), from the verb prōpositiō.

Pronunciation[edit]

  • (US) enPR: präp'ə-zĭshʹən IPA(key): /ˌpɹɑpəˈzɪʃən/
  • (file)
  • Rhymes: -ɪʃən
  • Hyphenation: prop‧o‧si‧tion

Noun[edit]

proposition (countable and uncountable, plural propositions)

  1. (uncountable) The act of offering (an idea) for consideration.
  2. (countable) An idea or a plan offered.
    • 1898, Winston Churchill, chapter 8, in The Celebrity:
      The humor of my proposition appealed more strongly to Miss Trevor than I had looked for, and from that time forward she became her old self again; for, even after she had conquered her love for the Celebrity, the mortification of having been jilted by him remained.
  3. (countable, business settings) The terms of a transaction offered.
  4. (countable, US, politics) In some states, a proposed statute or constitutional amendment to be voted on by the electorate.
  5. (grammar) A complete sentence.
    • The Popular Educator: a Complete Encyclopaedia of Elementary, Advanced, and Technical Education. New and Revised Edition. Volume I., p.98:
      Our English nouns remain unchanged, whether they form the subject or the object of a proposition.
  6. (countable, logic) The content of an assertion that may be taken as being true or false and is considered abstractly without reference to the linguistic sentence that constitutes the assertion; (Aristotelian logic) a predicate of a subject that is denied or affirmed and connected by a copula.
    “'Wiktionary is a good dictionary' is a proposition” is a proposition.
  7. (countable, mathematics) An assertion so formulated that it can be considered true or false.
  8. (countable, mathematics) An assertion which is provably true, but not important enough to be called a theorem.
  9. A statement of religious doctrine; an article of faith; creed.
    the propositions of Wyclif and Huss
    • Jeremy Taylor
      Some persons [] change their propositions according as their temporal necessities or advantages do turn.
  10. (poetry) The part of a poem in which the author states the subject or matter of it.

Synonyms[edit]

Derived terms[edit]

Translations[edit]

The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables, removing any numbers. Numbers do not necessarily match those in definitions. See instructions at Wiktionary:Entry layout#Translations.

Verb[edit]

proposition (third-person singular simple present propositions, present participle propositioning, simple past and past participle propositioned)

  1. (transitive, informal) To make a suggestion of sexual intercourse to (someone with whom one is not sexually involved).
  2. (transitive, informal) To make an offer or suggestion to (someone).

Related terms[edit]

Translations[edit]

Anagrams[edit]


Finnish[edit]

Noun[edit]

proposition

  1. Genitive singular form of propositio.

French[edit]

French Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia fr

Etymology[edit]

From Latin prōpositiō (statement, proposition), from prōpōnō (propose), from pōnō (place; assume).

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

proposition f (plural propositions)

  1. proposition, suggestion
  2. (grammar) proposition
  3. (grammar) clause

Further reading[edit]


Middle English[edit]

Noun[edit]

proposition

  1. Alternative form of proposicioun

Norman[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin prōpositiō, prōpositiōnem.

Noun[edit]

proposition f (plural propositions)

  1. (Jersey) proposition
  2. (Jersey, grammar) clause

Derived terms[edit]


Swedish[edit]

Swedish Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia sv

Noun[edit]

proposition c

  1. a proposition, a government bill[1] (draft of a law, proposed by the government)

Usage notes[edit]

  • bills introduced by members of parliament are called motion

Declension[edit]

Declension of proposition 
Singular Plural
Indefinite Definite Indefinite Definite
Nominative proposition propositionen propositioner propositionerna
Genitive propositions propositionens propositioners propositionernas

Related terms[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Government terms, Government Offices of Sweden