motion

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English[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Borrowed from Anglo-Norman motion, Middle French motion, Old French mocion, and their etymon Latin motio (movement, motion).

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

motion (countable and uncountable, plural motions)

  1. (uncountable) A state of progression from one place to another.
    Synonym: movement
    Antonym: rest
  2. (countable) A change of position with respect to time.
    • (Can we date this quote by Dr. H. More and provide title, author's full name, and other details?)
      This is the great wheel to which the clock owes its motion.
  3. (physics) A change from one place to another.
    Synonyms: move, movement
    Antonym: rest
    • 1839, Denison Olmsted, A Compendium of Astronomy Page 95
      Secondly, When a body is once in motion it will continue to move forever, unless something stops it. When a ball is struck on the surface of the earth, the friction of the earth and the resistance of the air soon stop its motion.
  4. (countable) A parliamentary action to propose something. A similar procedure in any official or business meeting.
    The motion to amend is now open for discussion.
  5. (obsolete) An entertainment or show, especially a puppet show.
    • 1644, John Milton, Aeropagitica
      when God gave him reason, he gave him freedom to choose, for reason is but choosing; he had bin else a meer artificiall Adam, such an Adam as he is in the motions.
  6. (philosophy) from κίνησις (kinesis); any change. Traditionally of four types: generation and corruption, alteration, augmentation and diminution, and change of place.
    • 1662, Henry More, An Antidote Against Atheism, Book II, A Collection of Several Philosophical Writings of Dr. Henry More, p. 53:
      "I say, it is no uneven jot, to pass from the more faint and obscure examples of Spermatical life to the more considerable effects of general Motion in Minerals, Metalls, and sundry Meteors, whose easie and rude shapes may have no need of any Principle of Life, or Spermatical form distinct from the Rest or Motion of the particles of the Matter."
  7. Movement of the mind, desires, or passions; mental act, or impulse to any action; internal activity.
    • (Can we date this quote by South and provide title, author's full name, and other details?)
      Let a good man obey every good motion rising in his heart, knowing that every such motion proceeds from God.
  8. (law) A formal request, oral or written, made to a judge or court of law to obtain an official court ruling or order for a legal action to be taken by, or on behalf of, the movant.
  9. (euphemistic) A movement of the bowels; the product of such movement.
    • 1857, William Braithwaite, The Retrospect of Medicine:
      From that time to the present (three weeks) she has taken one pill every night, and had one comfortable motion every morning without the aid of any other aperient, and her health has much improved.
  10. (music) Change of pitch in successive sounds, whether in the same part or in groups of parts. (Conjunct motion is that by single degrees of the scale. Contrary motion is when parts move in opposite directions. Disjunct motion is motion by skips. Oblique motion is when one part is stationary while another moves. Similar or direct motion is when parts move in the same direction.)
    • (Can we date this quote by Grove and provide title, author's full name, and other details?)
      The independent motions of different parts sounding together constitute counterpoint.
  11. (obsolete) A puppet, or puppet show.
    • (Can we date this quote by Beaumont and Fletcher and provide title, author's full name, and other details?)
      What motion's this? the model of Nineveh?
  12. (mechanical engineering) A piece of moving mechanism, such as on a steam locomotive.
    • 1939 June, “Pertinent Paragraphs: The Bideford, Westward Ho! & Appledore Railway”, in Railway Magazine, page 459:
      [...] three 2-4-2 tank engines were secured from the Hunslet Engine Co. of Leeds. As the line began on the Quay in Bideford, the locomotives had their motion encased, as shown in the illustrations on page 414.

Derived terms[edit]

Translations[edit]

Verb[edit]

motion (third-person singular simple present motions, present participle motioning, simple past and past participle motioned)

  1. To gesture indicating a desired movement.
    He motioned for me to come closer.
    • 2020 March 1, Anthony Zurcher, “Trump addresses Congress: A kinder, gentler president”, in BBC News[1]:
      After spending a few paragraphs blasting Obamacare, including motioning directly at the Democrats during his sharpest condemnations, the president laid down a few markers for what he wanted to see replace the current system.
  2. (proscribed) To introduce a motion in parliamentary procedure.
  3. To make a proposal; to offer plans.
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Shakespeare to this entry?)

Usage notes[edit]

The parliamentary sense is incorrectly used by people who are not familiar with parliamentary procedure. They might say “I motion that such-and-such” – however, it would be correct to say “I move that such-and-such”.

Related terms[edit]


Danish[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Borrowed from French motion, from Latin mōtio (movement), from movēre (to move).

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /mosjoːn/, [moˈɕoːˀn]

Noun[edit]

motion c (singular definite motionen, not used in plural form)

  1. exercise (physical activity intended to improve strength and fitness)

Further reading[edit]


French[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old French motion, mocion, borrowed from Latin motiō, motiōnem, noun of action from perfect passive participle motus (having been moved), from verb movere (move), + noun of action suffix -io.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

motion f (plural motions)

  1. motion (4)
    Il s'agit d'une motion de censure.It's all about a motion of no confidence.

Related terms[edit]

Further reading[edit]


Norman[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old French motion, mocion, borrowed from Latin mōtio (movement, motion).

Noun[edit]

motion f (plural motions)

  1. (Jersey) motion

Swedish[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

motion c

  1. exercise (physical activity)
  2. a motion[2] (proposal from a member of parliament)

Declension[edit]

Declension of motion 
Singular Plural
Indefinite Definite Indefinite Definite
Nominative motion motionen motioner motionerna
Genitive motions motionens motioners motionernas

Related terms[edit]

Derived terms[edit]

References[edit]