movement

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English[edit]

English Wikipedia has articles on:
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Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Borrowed from Old French movement (modern French mouvement), from movoir + -ment; cf. also Medieval Latin movimentum, from Latin movere (move).

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /ˈmuːv.mənt/
  • (file)
  • Hyphenation: move‧ment

Noun[edit]

movement (countable and uncountable, plural movements)

  1. Physical motion between points in space.
    Synonym: motion
    Antonym: stasis
    I saw a movement in that grass on the hill.
  2. (engineering) A system or mechanism for transmitting motion of a definite character, or for transforming motion, such as the wheelwork of a watch.
  3. The impression of motion in an artwork, painting, novel etc.
  4. A trend in various fields or social categories, a group of people with a common ideology who try together to achieve certain general goals
    The labor movement has been struggling in America since the passage of the Taft-Hartley act in 1947.
  5. (music) A large division of a larger composition.
  6. (music) Melodic progression, accentual character, tempo or pace.
  7. (aviation) An instance of an aircraft taking off or landing.
    Albuquerque International Sunport serviced over 200,000 movements last year.
  8. (baseball) The deviation of a pitch from ballistic flight.
    The movement on his cutter was devastating.
  9. (bridge) A pattern in which pairs change opponents and boards move from table to table in duplicate bridge.
  10. An act of emptying the bowels.
    • 1923, Samuel Goodwin Gant, Diseases of the Rectum, Anus, and Colon, Including the Ileocolic Angle, page 47:
      when after a movement feces are streaked with blood and the patient suffers from sphincter algia, a fissure should be suspected,
  11. (obsolete) Motion of the mind or feelings; emotion.

Derived terms[edit]

Translations[edit]

See also[edit]


Middle French[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old French movement.

Noun[edit]

movement m (plural movemens)

  1. movement

Descendants[edit]

  • French: mouvement

Occitan[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old Occitan; equivalent to mover +‎ -ment. Cf. also Medieval Latin movimentum.

Noun[edit]

movement m (plural movements)

  1. movement (physical motion)
  2. movement (trend in various fields)

Related terms[edit]

Further reading[edit]

  • Joan de Cantalausa (2006) Diccionari general occitan a partir dels parlars lengadocians, 2 edition, →ISBN, page 664.

Old French[edit]

Etymology[edit]

movoir +‎ -ment; cf. also Medieval Latin mōvimentum (itself probably partly based on the Old French or other early Romance cognates), from Latin moveō.

Noun[edit]

movement m (oblique plural movemenz or movementz, nominative singular movemenz or movementz, nominative plural movement)

  1. movement

Descendants[edit]