mover

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English[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

mover ‎(plural movers)

  1. Someone who or something which moves.
  2. A dancer.
  3. A person employed to help people move from one residence to another.

Derived terms[edit]

Anagrams[edit]


Asturian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin movēre, present active infinitive of moveō.

Verb[edit]

mover

  1. to move

Related terms[edit]


Galician[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin movēre, present active infinitive of moveō.

Verb[edit]

mover ‎(first-person singular present movo, first-person singular preterite movín, past participle movido)

  1. to move
  2. first-person and third-person singular future subjunctive of mover
  3. first-person and third-person singular personal infinitive of mover

Conjugation[edit]


Interlingua[edit]

Verb[edit]

mover

  1. (transitive) to move

mover se

  1. (reflexive) to move

Conjugation[edit]


Old French[edit]

Verb[edit]

mover

  1. (Anglo-Norman) Alternative form of movoir

Old Provençal[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Latin moveō.

Pronunciation[edit]

Verb[edit]

mover

  1. to move

References[edit]


Portuguese[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old Portuguese mover, Latin movēre, present active infinitive of moveō, from Proto-Indo-European *mew- ‎(to move).

Pronunciation[edit]

Verb[edit]

mover ‎(first-person singular present indicative movo, past participle movido)

  1. to move (to change position)
  2. to induce; to persuade
  3. (with contra following the object) to sue (to file legal action)
    João moveu uma ação contra Pedro.
    John sued Peter.
  4. (chess and other games) to move (to change the place of a piece)

Conjugation[edit]

Synonyms[edit]

Related terms[edit]


Spanish[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin movēre, present active infinitive of moveō.

Verb[edit]

mover ‎(first-person singular present muevo, first-person singular preterite moví, past participle movido)

  1. to move

Conjugation[edit]

  • Rule: o becomes a ue in stressed syllables.

Related terms[edit]