sue

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See also: Sue, sué, su'e, and

English[edit]

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Etymology[edit]

From Middle English seuen, sewen, siwen, borrowed from Anglo-Norman suer, siwer et al. and Old French sivre (to follow after) ( > French suivre), from Vulgar Latin *sequere (to follow), from Latin sequi. Cognate with Italian seguire and Spanish seguir. Doublet of segue. Related to suit.

Pronunciation[edit]

Verb[edit]

sue (third-person singular simple present sues, present participle suing, simple past and past participle sued)

  1. (transitive) To file a legal action against someone, generally a non-criminal action.
    sue someone for selling a faulty product
    I plan to sue you for everything you have.
    • 1897, Warren Bert Kimberly, “W. Horgan”, in History of West Australia:
      He was sued by the late Geo. Walpole Leake for slander, and after two trials, occupying eight days, he was mulcted in heavy damages and costs.
  2. (transitive, intransitive) To seek by request; to make application; to petition; to entreat; to plead.
  3. (transitive, falconry, of a hawk) To clean (the beak, etc.).
  4. (transitive, nautical) To leave high and dry on shore[1].
    to sue a ship
  5. (obsolete, transitive) To court.
  6. (obsolete, transitive) To follow.
    • a. 1472, Thomas Malory, “Capitulum iv”, in [Le Morte Darthur], book XIII, [London: [] by William Caxton], published 31 July 1485, OCLC 71490786; republished as H[einrich] Oskar Sommer, editor, Le Morte Darthur [], London: David Nutt, [], 1889, OCLC 890162034:
      And the olde knyght seyde unto the yonge knyght, ‘Sir, swith me.’
    • 1590, Edmund Spenser, The Faerie Queen, III. iv:
      though oft looking backward, well she vewd, / Her selfe freed from that foster insolent, / And that it was a knight, which now her sewd, / Yet she no lesse the knight feard, then that villein rude.

Quotations[edit]

Derived terms[edit]

Related terms[edit]

Translations[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ 1841, Richard Henry Dana Jr., The Seaman's Friend

Anagrams[edit]


Ewe[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Adjective[edit]

sue

  1. small

French[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Verb[edit]

sue

  1. inflection of suer:
    1. first/third-person singular present indicative/subjunctive
    2. second-person singular imperative
  2. feminine singular past participle of savoir

Anagrams[edit]


Italian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin suae.

Pronunciation[edit]

  • Hyphenation: su‧e

Adjective[edit]

sue

  1. his, her, its; plural of sua

Anagrams[edit]


Japanese[edit]

Romanization[edit]

sue

  1. Rōmaji transcription of すえ

Latin[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Verb[edit]

sue

  1. second-person singular present active imperative of suō

Noun[edit]

sue

  1. ablative singular of sūs

Middle English[edit]

Noun[edit]

sue

  1. Alternative form of sowe

Portuguese[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

  • Hyphenation: su‧e

Verb[edit]

sue

  1. first-person singular (eu) present subjunctive of suar
  2. third-person singular (ele and ela, also used with você and others) present subjunctive of suar
  3. third-person singular (você) affirmative imperative of suar
  4. third-person singular (você) negative imperative of suar

Tarantino[edit]

Pronoun[edit]

sue m (possessive, feminine soje)

  1. his