sus

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See also: Sus, SUS, süs, šus, -sus, sus', Sus., and šūs

English[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

sus ‎(uncountable)

  1. (Britain, informal) Suspicion (in terms of a sus law).
    • 2002, Simon James, British Government: A Reader in Policy Making (page 84)
      The committee [] said 'sus' had acquired a symbolic significance out of all proportion to its significance as a criminal charge.

Aromanian[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Vulgar Latin sūsum, from Latin sursūm. Compare Daco-Romanian sus.

Adverb[edit]

sus

  1. up

Antonyms[edit]


Cebuano[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Shortened form of susmaryosep.

Interjection[edit]

sus

  1. Used as an expression of anger, frustration or disbelief.

Chuukese[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Borrowing from English shoes.

Noun[edit]

sus

  1. shoe

Danish[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /suːs/, [suːˀs]

Noun[edit]

sus n (singular definite suset, plural indefinite sus)

  1. whistling, singing
  2. whisper, soughing
  3. whizz
  4. rush (pleasurable sensation experienced after use of a stimulant)

Synonyms[edit]

Inflection[edit]

Verb[edit]

sus

  1. imperative of suse

Finnish[edit]

Interjection[edit]

sus

  1. oh; used only in the expression shown in the example below.

French[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Old French [Term?], from Vulgar Latin sūsum, from Latin sūrsum. Cognate to Italian su.

Adverb[edit]

sus

  1. (dated) up
Derived terms[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

see savoir

Verb[edit]

sus

  1. first-person singular past historic of savoir
  2. second-person singular past historic of savoir

External links[edit]


Irarutu[edit]

Noun[edit]

sus

  1. (woman's) breast

References[edit]

  • J. C. Anceaux, The Linguistic Situation in the Islands of Yapen, Kurudu, Nau and Miosnum (2013), page 46

Latin[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Indo-European *suH-. Compare Ancient Greek ὗς ‎(hûs), English swine, sow.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

sūs m, f ‎(genitive suis); third declension

  1. pig

Declension[edit]

Third declension, irregular.

Case Singular Plural
nominative sūs suēs
genitive suis suum
dative suī suibus
sūbus
subus
accusative suem suēs
ablative sue suibus
sūbus
subus
vocative sūs suēs

Synonyms[edit]

Derived terms[edit]

Descendants[edit]

  • Italian: suino
  • Sardinian: sue (Campidanese)

References[edit]

  • sus in Charlton T. Lewis & Charles Short (1879) A Latin Dictionary, Oxford: Clarendon Press
  • sus in Charlton T. Lewis (1891) An Elementary Latin Dictionary, New York: Harper & Brothers
  • SUS in Charles du Fresne du Cange’s Glossarium Mediæ et Infimæ Latinitatis (augmented edition, 1883–1887)
  • sus in Félix Gaffiot (1934), Dictionnaire Illustré Latin-Français, Paris: Hachette.
  • Meissner, Carl; Auden, Henry William (1894) Latin Phrase-Book[1], London: Macmillan and Co.
    • (ambiguous) to have become independent, be no longer a minor: sui iuris factum esse
    • (ambiguous) to outlive, survive all one's kin: omnium suorum or omnibus suis superstitem esse
    • (ambiguous) to shed one's blood for one's fatherland: sanguinem suum pro patria effundere or profundere
    • (ambiguous) to take measures for one's safety; to look after one's own interests: suis rebus or sibi consulere
    • (ambiguous) to employ in the furtherance of one's interests: aliquid in usum suum conferre
    • (ambiguous) to leave a great reputation behind one: magnam sui famam relinquere
    • (ambiguous) to use up, make full use of one's spare time: otio abūti or otium ad suum usum transferre
    • (ambiguous) to win renown amongst posterity by some act: nomen suum posteritati aliqua re commendare, propagare, prodere
    • (ambiguous) to immortalise one's name: memoriam nominis sui immortalitati tradere, mandare, commendare
    • (ambiguous) to take a thing to heart: demittere aliquid in pectus or in pectus animumque suum
    • (ambiguous) to be contented: rebus suis, sorte sua contentum esse
    • (ambiguous) to lose one's head, be beside oneself: sui (mentis) compotem non esse
    • (ambiguous) to despair of one's position: desperare suis rebus
    • (ambiguous) to cause oneself to be expected: exspectationem sui facere, commovere
    • (ambiguous) self-confidence: fiducia sui (Liv. 25. 37)
    • (ambiguous) a man of no self-control, self-indulgent: homo impotens sui
    • (ambiguous) to do one's duty: officium suum facere, servare, colere, tueri, exsequi, praestare
    • (ambiguous) to neglect one's duty: officium suum deserere, neglegere
    • (ambiguous) to be courteous, obliging to some one: aliquem officiis suis complecti, prosequi
    • (ambiguous) to follow one's inclinations: studiis suis obsequi (De Or. 1. 1. 3)
    • (ambiguous) to be a strict disciplinarian in one's household: severum imperium in suis exercere, tenere (De Sen. 11. 37)
    • (ambiguous) to go into mourning: vestem mutare (opp. ad vestitum suum redire) (Planc. 12. 29)
    • (ambiguous) to give audience to some one: sui potestatem facere, praebere alicui
    • (ambiguous) to have no debts: in suis nummis versari (Verr. 4. 6. 11)
    • (ambiguous) (a state) has its own laws, is autonomous: suis legibus utitur (B. G. 1. 45. 3)
    • (ambiguous) to grant a people its independence: populum liberum esse, libertate uti, sui iuris esse pati
    • (ambiguous) to assert one's right: ius suum persequi
    • (ambiguous) to obtain justice: ius suum adipisci (Liv. 1. 32. 10)
    • (ambiguous) to maintain one's right: ius suum tenere, obtinere
    • (ambiguous) to accept battle: potestatem sui facere (alicui) (cf. sect. XII. 9, note audientia...)
  • De Vaan, Michiel (2008) Etymological Dictionary of Latin and the other Italic Languages (Leiden Indo-European Etymological Dictionary Series; 7), Leiden, Boston: Brill

Middle French[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old French sus.

Adverb[edit]

sus

  1. on; on top of

Preposition[edit]

sus

  1. on; on top of; atop

Descendants[edit]

  • French: sus (obsolete)

Norman[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

  • (file)

Etymology 1[edit]

From Old French sus, from Latin sursum.

Preposition[edit]

sus

  1. (Guernsey) on

Etymology 2[edit]

Verb[edit]

sus

  1. first-person singular preterite of saver

Northern Sami[edit]

Pronoun[edit]

sus

  1. locative of son

Old French[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Latin subtus.

Preposition[edit]

sus

  1. under; underneath
Descendants[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

From Vulgar Latin sūsum, from Latin sūrsum.

Preposition[edit]

sus

  1. on; on top of; atop
Descendants[edit]

Romanian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Vulgar Latin, Late Latin root sūsum, from Latin sūrsum.

Adverb[edit]

sus

  1. up

Antonyms[edit]

See also[edit]


Spanish[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Adjective[edit]

sus pl

  1. plural of su His, her, its, one's.
  2. (formal) Your.
Related terms[edit]

Turkish[edit]

Verb[edit]

sus

  1. second-person singular imperative of susmak

West Frisian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From suster, from Old Frisian swester, from Proto-Germanic *swestēr, from Proto-Indo-European *swésōr. Compare Dutch zuster, zus, Low German swester, English sister, German Schwester, Danish søster.

Noun[edit]

sus c ‎(plural sussen)

  1. sister