saver

Definition from Wiktionary, the free dictionary
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See also: savér and savêr

English[edit]

Etymology[edit]

save +‎ -er

Pronunciation[edit]

  • (file)

Noun[edit]

saver (plural savers)

  1. One who saves.
    a saver of souls
    • 2013 June 1, “End of the peer show”, in The Economist, volume 407, number 8838, page 71:
      Finance is seldom romantic. But the idea of peer-to-peer lending comes close. This is an industry that brings together individual savers and lenders on online platforms. Those that want to borrow are matched with those that want to lend.
  2. One who keeps savings more than usual.
    He's a saver and she's a spender; you'd think the marriage would be doomed, but he keeps them from going into bankruptcy and she makes sure they have a lot of fun.
  3. A ticket or coupon that offers a discount.
    • 2017, Off Track Planet's Travel Guide for the Young, Sexy, and Broke
      Tickets are cheaper the younger you are—snag a youth ticket (if you're twenty-five or under) for a 35 percent discount. If both you and your travel partner are twenty-six or older, the Small Group Saver will knock off 15 percent.

Translations[edit]

Derived terms[edit]

See also[edit]

These words are easily confused with this one:

Anagrams[edit]


Middle English[edit]

Noun[edit]

saver

  1. Alternative form of saveour

Norman[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old French saveir, savoir, from Vulgar Latin *sapēre (to know), from Classical Latin sapiō, sapĕre (taste), from Proto-Indo-European *sap- (to try, to research).

Verb[edit]

saver

  1. (Jersey, Guernsey) to know

Old Frisian[edit]

Ēnes bērnes sāver.

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-West Germanic *saifr.

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /ˈsaːfer/
  • (Late Old Frisian) IPA(key): /ˈsaːwer/

Noun[edit]

sāver m

  1. spittle, saliva

Alternative forms[edit]

Further reading[edit]

  • Bremmer, Rolf H. (2009) An Introduction to Old Frisian: History, Grammar, Reader, Glossary, Amsterdam: John Benjamins Publishing Company, →ISBN, page 28

Romansch[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

  • (Rumantsch Grischun, Puter, Vallader) savair
  • (Surmiran) saveir

Etymology[edit]

From Vulgar Latin *sapēre, from Classial Latin sapiō, sapere (taste), from Proto-Indo-European *seh₁p- (to try, to research).

Verb[edit]

saver

  1. (Sursilvan, Sutsilvan) to know (how to do something)

Venetian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Vulgar Latin *sapēre, from Classical Latin sapere, present active infinitive of sapiō (taste). Compare Italian sapere.

Verb[edit]

saver

  1. (transitive) to know (how to)
  2. (transitive) to be able to; can