ticket

From Wiktionary, the free dictionary
Jump to navigation Jump to search
See also: Ticket

English[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Middle English ticket, from Middle French etiquet m, estiquet m, and etiquette f, estiquette f (a bill, note, label, ticket), from Old French estechier, estichier, estequier (to attach, stick), (compare Picard estiquier (to stick, pierce)), from Frankish *stikkjan, *stekan (to stick, pierce, sting), from Proto-Germanic *stikaną, *stikōną, *staikijaną (to be sharp, pierce, prick), from Proto-Indo-European *(s)teyg- (to be sharp, to stab). Doublet of etiquette. More at stick.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

ticket (plural tickets)

A ticket.
  1. A pass entitling the holder to admission to a show, concert, etc.
  2. A pass entitling the holder to board a train, a bus, a plane, or other means of transportation
  3. A citation for a traffic violation.
  4. A permit to operate a machine on a construction site.
  5. A service request, used to track complaints or requests that an issue be handled. (Generally technical support related).
  6. (politics, informal) A list of candidates for an election, or a particular theme to a candidate's manifesto.
    Joe has joined the party's ticket for the county elections.
    Joe will be running on an anti-crime ticket.
    • 2019 March 3, Simon van Zuylen-Wood, “When Did Everyone Become a Socialist?”, in New York Magazine[1]:
      Candidates like Ocasio-Cortez and Sanders are no longer too precious to run on the Democratic ticket, though the proposals they suggest are so ambitious — like Medicare for All, a Green New Deal, and free public college — that they don’t feel like compromises at all.
    • 2020 November 7, Chelsea Janes, “Kamala Harris, daughter of Jamaican and Indian immigrants, elected nation’s first female vice president”, in Washington Post[2]:
      Harris’s victory comes 55 years after the Voting Rights Act abolished laws that disenfranchised Black Americans, 36 years after the first woman ran on a presidential ticket and four years after Democrats were devastated by the defeat of Hillary Clinton
  7. A solution to a problem; something that is needed.
    That's the ticket.
    I saw my first bike as my ticket to freedom.
  8. (dated) A little note or notice.
    • a. 1662 (date written), Thomas Fuller, The History of the Worthies of England, London: [] J[ohn] G[rismond,] W[illiam] L[eybourne] and W[illiam] G[odbid], published 1662, →OCLC:
      He constantly read his lectures twice a week for above forty years, giving notice of the time to his auditors in a ticket on the school doors.
  9. (dated) A tradesman's bill or account (hence the phrase on ticket and eventually on tick).
  10. A label affixed to goods to show their price or description.
  11. A certificate or token of a share in a lottery or other scheme for distributing money, goods, etc.
  12. (dated) A visiting card.
    • 1878, Mrs. James Mason, All about Edith, page 124:
      I asked for a card, please, and she was quite put about, and said that she didn't require tickets to get in where she visited.
    • 1899, The Leisure Hour: An Illustrated Magazine for Home Reading:
      "Mr. Gibbs come in just now," said Mrs. Blewett, "and left his ticket over the chimley. There 'tis. I haven't touched it."
  13. (law enforcement slang) A warrant.
    • 1999, Doug Most, Always in Our Hearts, page 148:
      [] I need a ticket, Bobby.” Agnor knew a ticket meant a search warrant.
  14. A certificate of qualification as a ship's master, pilot, or other crew member.
    • 1942 July-August, T. F. Cameron, “How the Staff of a Railway is Recruited”, in Railway Magazine, page 207:
      The variety of the demands of the railways for staff is almost endless. They require men with master's tickets as dock masters and to command their steamships.

Derived terms[edit]

Descendants[edit]

Translations[edit]

The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables. See instructions at Wiktionary:Entry layout § Translations.

See also[edit]

Verb[edit]

ticket (third-person singular simple present tickets, present participle ticketing, simple past and past participle ticketed)

  1. To issue someone a ticket, as for travel or for a violation of a local or traffic law.
  2. To mark with a ticket.
    to ticket goods in a retail store

Derived terms[edit]

Translations[edit]

Anagrams[edit]

Dutch[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Borrowed from English ticket.

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /ˈtɪ.kət/
  • (file)
  • Hyphenation: tic‧ket

Noun[edit]

ticket n or m (plural tickets, diminutive ticketje n)

  1. ticket or voucher

Derived terms[edit]

Descendants[edit]

French[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Orthographic borrowing from English ticket, itself a borrowing from Middle French estiquet (thus a reborrowing). Doublet of étiquette

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

ticket m (plural tickets)

  1. ticket (admission, pass)
  2. receipt
  3. (Quebec) ticket (traffic citation)

Derived terms[edit]

Further reading[edit]

Italian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Unadapted borrowing from English ticket. Doublet of etichetta.

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /ˈti.ket/
  • Rhymes: -iket
  • Hyphenation: tìc‧ket

Noun[edit]

ticket m (invariable)

  1. prescription charge
  2. ticket stub (especially at a horserace)

Further reading[edit]

  • ticket in Treccani.it – Vocabolario Treccani on line, Istituto dell'Enciclopedia Italiana

Portuguese[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Unadapted borrowing from English ticket.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

ticket m (plural tickets)

  1. (Brazil) Alternative form of tíquete

Spanish[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Unadapted borrowing from English ticket.

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /ˈtiket/ [ˈt̪i.ket̪]
  • Rhymes: -iket
  • Syllabification: tic‧ket

Noun[edit]

ticket m (plural tickets)

  1. receipt

Usage notes[edit]

According to Royal Spanish Academy (RAE) prescriptions, unadapted foreign words should be written in italics in a text printed in roman type, and vice versa, and in quotation marks in a manuscript text or when italics are not available. In practice, this RAE prescription is not always followed.

Swedish[edit]

Noun[edit]

ticket

  1. definite singular of tick