caper

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English[edit]

English Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia

Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

Clipping of capriole.

Noun[edit]

caper (plural capers)

  1. A playful leap or jump.
  2. A jump while dancing.
  3. A prank or practical joke.
  4. (usually in plural) Playful behaviour.
  5. (figuratively) A crime, especially an elaborate heist, or a narrative about such a crime.
    • 2008 January–February, “70 Ways to Improve Every Day of the Week”, in Men's Health, volume 23, number 1, ISSN 1054-4836, page 135:
      59 sneak in some red Smuggle a bottle of wine, two glasses, and a corkscrew into a long matinee. Red wine is rich in life-extending antioxidants, and the caper will add zest even to a bad movie.
Derived terms[edit]
Related terms[edit]
Translations[edit]

Verb[edit]

caper (third-person singular simple present capers, present participle capering, simple past and past participle capered)

  1. To leap or jump about in a sprightly or playful manner.
  2. To jump as part of a dance.
  3. To engage in playful behaviour.
Translations[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

From Dutch kaper.

Noun[edit]

caper (plural capers)

  1. A vessel formerly used by the Dutch; privateer.
Translations[edit]

Etymology 3[edit]

A caper bush.

From Latin capparis, from Ancient Greek κάππαρις (kápparis).

Noun[edit]

caper (plural capers)

  1. The pungent grayish green flower bud of the European and Oriental caper (Capparis spinosa), which is pickled and eaten.
  2. A plant of the genus Capparis.
    Synonyms: caper bush, caper tree, caperberry
Derived terms[edit]
Translations[edit]

Further reading[edit]

Etymology 4[edit]

Shortening of capercaillie.

Noun[edit]

caper (plural capers)

  1. (Scotland) The capercaillie.
Translations[edit]

Anagrams[edit]


French[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From English cap + -er.

Pronunciation[edit]

Verb[edit]

caper

  1. (finance) to cap (set a limit to)
  2. (sports) to cap (award a player a cap for playing for their national team)

Conjugation[edit]


Indonesian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From blend of cari (seeking) +‎ perhatian (attention), from calque of English attention-seeking.

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): [ˈt͡ʃapər]
  • Hyphenation: ca‧pêr

Adjective[edit]

capêr (plural caper-caper)

  1. (colloquial, acronym) attention-seeking.

Further reading[edit]


Latin[edit]

Etymology[edit]

caper

From Proto-Indo-European *kápros (buck, he-goat).

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

caper m (genitive caprī); second declension

  1. a male goat, billy goat
    Synonym: hircus
  2. vocative singular of caper

Declension[edit]

Second-declension noun (nominative singular in -er).

Case Singular Plural
Nominative caper caprī
Genitive caprī caprōrum
Dative caprō caprīs
Accusative caprum caprōs
Ablative caprō caprīs
Vocative caper caprī

Related terms[edit]

Descendants[edit]

  • Italian: capro
  • French: chevron
  • Spanish: cabro, cabrón

References[edit]

  • caper in Charlton T. Lewis and Charles Short (1879) A Latin Dictionary, Oxford: Clarendon Press
  • caper in Charlton T. Lewis (1891) An Elementary Latin Dictionary, New York: Harper & Brothers
  • caper in Gaffiot, Félix (1934) Dictionnaire Illustré Latin-Français, Hachette
  • caper in Harry Thurston Peck, editor (1898) Harper's Dictionary of Classical Antiquities, New York: Harper & Brothers
  • caper in William Smith, editor (1848) A Dictionary of Greek Biography and Mythology, London: John Murray

Middle French[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Borrowed from Latin capere.

Verb[edit]

caper

  1. to seize

Conjugation[edit]

  • Middle French conjugation varies from one text to another. Hence, the following conjugation should be considered as typical, not as exhaustive.

Norwegian Bokmål[edit]

Noun[edit]

caper m

  1. indefinite plural of cape