crime

Definition from Wiktionary, the free dictionary
Jump to navigation Jump to search

English[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Middle English cryme, crime, from Old French crime, crimne, from Latin crīmen. Displaced native Old English firen.

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /kɹaɪm/
  • (file)
  • Rhymes: -aɪm

Noun[edit]

crime (countable and uncountable, plural crimes)

  1. (countable) A specific act committed in violation of the law.
  2. (countable) Any great sin or wickedness; iniquity.
    • 1708, Alexander Pope, Ode for Music on St Cecilia's Day:
      No crime was thine, if 'tis no crime to love.
  3. (countable, obsolete) That which occasions crime.
  4. (uncountable) Criminal acts collectively.
    Synonyms: criminality, delinquency
  5. (uncountable) The habit or practice of committing crimes.
    Crime doesn’t pay.

Usage notes[edit]

  • Adjectives often applied to crime: organized, brutal, terrible, horrible, heinous, horrendous, hideous, financial, sexual, international.

Hyponyms[edit]

Derived terms[edit]

Translations[edit]

The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables, removing any numbers. Numbers do not necessarily match those in definitions. See instructions at Wiktionary:Entry layout § Translations.

References[edit]

Verb[edit]

crime (third-person singular simple present crimes, present participle criming, simple past and past participle crimed)

  1. (Britain, military, transitive) To subject to disciplinary punishment.
    • 1846, John Mercier McMullen, Camp and Barrack-room, Or, The British Army as it is (page 298)
      Nevertheless, in the course of a few days he is again intoxicated, creates disturbance in his quarters, is confined by his sergeant, crimed, and brought before the commanding officer []
  2. (nonce word) To commit crime(s).
    • 1987, Robert Sampson, Yesterday's Faces: From the Dark Side, →ISBN, page 61:
      If, during the 1920s, the master criminal was a gamester, criming for self expression, during the 1930s he performed in other ways for other purposes.

See also[edit]

Anagrams[edit]


French[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old French crimne, borrowed from Latin crīmen, from Proto-Italic *kreimen, from Proto-Indo-European *kréymn̥, from *krey- (sieve) + *-mn̥.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

crime m (plural crimes)

  1. A category of severe infractions within French law, with the strongest of penalties; a felony. (10 years and more according to law)
    Le meurtre, la trahison, ces sont les crimes punissable par la loi d'une peine lourde.

Derived terms[edit]

Related terms[edit]

See also[edit]

Further reading[edit]

Anagrams[edit]


Italian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Borrowed from Latin crīmen.

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /ˈkri.me/
  • Hyphenation: crì‧me

Noun[edit]

crime m (plural crimi)

  1. (literary, rare) crime
    Synonyms: crimine, delitto

Related terms[edit]

References[edit]

  • crime in Treccani.it – Vocabolario Treccani on line, Istituto dell'Enciclopedia Italiana

Middle English[edit]

Noun[edit]

crime

  1. Alternative form of cryme

Portuguese[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From French crime, from Latin crīmen.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

crime m (plural crimes)

  1. crime
    O ladrão cometeu um crime horrível.
    The thief committed a terrible crime.

Quotations[edit]

For quotations using this term, see Citations:crime.

Related terms[edit]


Romanian[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

crime f

  1. indefinite plural of crimă
  2. indefinite genitive/dative singular of crimă