crime

Definition from Wiktionary, the free dictionary
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English[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Middle English cryme, crime, from Old French crime, crimne, from Latin crīmen.

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /kɹaɪm/
  • (file)
  • Rhymes: -aɪm

Noun[edit]

crime (countable and uncountable, plural crimes)

  1. (countable) A specific act committed in violation of the law.
  2. (countable) Any great sin or wickedness; iniquity.
    • 1708, Alexander Pope, Ode for Music on St Cecilia's Day:
      No crime was thine, if 'tis no crime to love.
  3. (countable, obsolete) That which occasions crime.
    • (Can we date this quote by Spenser and provide title, author's full name, and other details?)
      the tree of life, the crime of our first father's fall
  4. (uncountable) Criminal acts collectively.
    Synonyms: criminality, delinquency
  5. (uncountable) The habit or practice of committing crimes.
    Crime doesn’t pay.

Usage notes[edit]

  • Adjectives often applied to crime: organized, brutal, terrible, horrible, heinous, horrendous, hideous, financial, sexual, international.

Hyponyms[edit]

Derived terms[edit]

Translations[edit]

The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables, removing any numbers. Numbers do not necessarily match those in definitions. See instructions at Wiktionary:Entry layout#Translations.

References[edit]

Verb[edit]

crime (third-person singular simple present crimes, present participle criming, simple past and past participle crimed)

  1. (Britain, military, transitive) To subject to disciplinary punishment.
    • 1846, John Mercier McMullen, Camp and Barrack-room, Or, The British Army as it is (page 298)
      Nevertheless, in the course of a few days he is again intoxicated, creates disturbance in his quarters, is confined by his sergeant, crimed, and brought before the commanding officer []
  2. (nonce word) To commit crime(s).
    • 1987, Robert Sampson, Yesterday's Faces: From the Dark Side, →ISBN, page 61:
      If, during the 1920s, the master criminal was a gamester, criming for self expression, during the 1930s he performed in other ways for other purposes.

See also[edit]

Anagrams[edit]


French[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old French crimne, borrowed from Latin crīmen, from Proto-Italic *kreimen, from Proto-Indo-European *kréymn̥, from *krey- (sieve) + *-mn̥.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

crime m (plural crimes)

  1. A category of severe infractions within French law, with the strongest of penalties; a felony. (10 years and more according to law)
    Le meurtre, la trahison, ces sont les crimes punissable par la loi d'une peine lourde.

Related terms[edit]

See also[edit]

Further reading[edit]

Anagrams[edit]


Italian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Borrowed from Latin crīmen.

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /ˈkri.me/
  • Hyphenation: crì‧me

Noun[edit]

crime m (plural crimi)

  1. (literary, rare) crime
    Synonyms: crimine, delitto

Related terms[edit]

References[edit]

  • crime in Treccani.it – Vocabolario Treccani on line, Istituto dell'Enciclopedia Italiana

Middle English[edit]

Noun[edit]

crime

  1. Alternative form of cryme

Portuguese[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From French crime, from Latin crīmen.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

crime m (plural crimes)

  1. crime
    O ladrão cometeu um crime horrível.
    The thief committed a terrible crime.

Quotations[edit]

For quotations of use of this term, see Citations:crime.

Related terms[edit]


Romanian[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

crime f

  1. indefinite plural of crimă
  2. indefinite genitive/dative singular of crimă