cape

Definition from Wiktionary, the free dictionary
Jump to navigation Jump to search
See also: Cape, capé, cápe, and çapë

English[edit]

Cape Cod.

Pronunciation[edit]

  • enPR: kāp, IPA(key): /keɪp/
  • (file)
  • Rhymes: -eɪp

Etymology 1[edit]

Borrowed from Middle French cap, from Occitan cap, from Latin caput (head).

Noun[edit]

cape (plural capes)

  1. (geography) A piece or point of land, extending beyond the adjacent coast into a sea or lake; a promontory; a headland.
    Synonyms: chersonese, peninsula, point
Derived terms[edit]
Translations[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

English Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia

From French cape, from Old Occitan capa, from Late Latin cappa (cape).

A young woman in a crocheted cape.

Noun[edit]

cape (plural capes)

  1. A sleeveless garment or part of a garment, hanging from the neck over the back, arms, and shoulders.
    • 1977, Agatha Christie, chapter 4, in An Autobiography, part II, London: Collins, →ISBN:
      Mind you, clothes were clothes in those days. […]  Frills, ruffles, flounces, lace, complicated seams and gores: not only did they sweep the ground and have to be held up in one hand elegantly as you walked along, but they had little capes or coats or feather boas.

Derived terms[edit]

Translations[edit]
See also[edit]

Verb[edit]

cape (third-person singular simple present capes, present participle caping, simple past and past participle caped)

  1. To incite or attract (a bull) to charge a certain direction, by waving a cape.
    • 2013, Odie Hawkins, The Black Matador, "Sugar" (AuthorHouse, →ISBN), page 140:
      “I became a novillero when I was fourteen, but I had already been going to the fields and caping bulls since I was about twelve."
  2. (nautical) To head or point; to keep a course.
    The ship capes southwest by south.
  3. To skin an animal, particularly a deer.
  4. (uncommon) To wear a cape.
    • 2017, April Daniels, Dreadnought: Nemesis - Book One (Diversion Books, →ISBN):
      Calamity tells me about the adventures she's had caping around the city, and I tell her about how I transitioned. When I tell her about David, and how he suddenly became a jerk overnight, she surprises me by nodding along.

Etymology 3[edit]

From Middle English capen (to stare, gape, look for, seek), from Old English capian (to look), from Proto-Germanic *kapjaną. Cognate with German gaffen (to stare at curiously, rubberneck), Low German gapen (to stare). Related to keep.

Verb[edit]

cape (third-person singular simple present capes, present participle caping, simple past and past participle caped)

  1. (obsolete) To look for, search after.
    Long may they search ere that they find that they after cape.
    (Geoffrey Chaucer)
  2. (rare, dialectal or obsolete) To gaze or stare.
    The captain just caped mindlessly into the distance as his ship was hit by volley after volley.
    This Nicholas ever caped upward into the air.
    (Geoffrey Chaucer)
References[edit]

Anagrams[edit]


French[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Borrowed from Old Occitan capa, from Late Latin cappa (compare the inherited doublet chape; cf. also the Old Northern French variant cape).

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

cape f (plural capes)

  1. cape

Verb[edit]

cape

  1. first-person singular present indicative of caper
  2. third-person singular present indicative of caper
  3. first-person singular present subjunctive of caper
  4. third-person singular present subjunctive of caper
  5. second-person singular imperative of caper

Further reading[edit]


Indonesian[edit]

Adjective[edit]

cape

  1. (slang) tired

Italian[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

cape f

  1. plural of capa

Anagrams[edit]


Latin[edit]

Verb[edit]

cape

  1. second-person singular present active imperative of capiō

References[edit]


Middle English[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Old English cæppe.

Noun[edit]

cape

  1. Alternative form of cappe

Etymology 2[edit]

From Latin cāpa, potentially through an Old English *cāpa.

Noun[edit]

cape

  1. Alternative form of cope

Neapolitan[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

cape f

  1. plural of capa

Norwegian Bokmål[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From English cape, from French cape, from Late Latin cappa. Cognate with kappe (cloak), kåpe (cloak), kapp (cape, headland).

Noun[edit]

cape m (definite singular capen, indefinite plural caper, definite plural capene)

  1. a cape (sleeveless garment worn by women, which covers the shoulders and arms)

References[edit]

  • “cape” in The Bokmål Dictionary.
  • cape” in The Ordnett Dictionary

Norwegian Nynorsk[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From English cape, from French cape, from Late Latin cappa.

Noun[edit]

cape m (definite singular capen, indefinite plural capar, definite plural capane)

  1. a cape (sleeveless garment worn by women, which covers the shoulders and arms)

References[edit]


Portuguese[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Verb[edit]

cape

  1. first-person singular (eu) present subjunctive of capar
  2. third-person singular (ele and ela, also used with você and others) present subjunctive of capar
  3. third-person singular (você) affirmative imperative of capar
  4. third-person singular (você) negative imperative of capar

Spanish[edit]

Verb[edit]

cape

  1. First-person singular (yo) present subjunctive form of capar.
  2. Formal second-person singular (usted) present subjunctive form of capar.
  3. Third-person singular (él, ella, also used with usted?) present subjunctive form of capar.
  4. Formal second-person singular (usted) imperative form of capar.

Swedish[edit]

Noun[edit]

cape c

  1. cape (sleeveless garment used by women)

Declension[edit]

Declension of cape 
Singular Plural
Indefinite Definite Indefinite Definite
Nominative cape capeen capeer capeerna
Genitive capes capeens capeers capeernas