capote

Definition from Wiktionary, the free dictionary
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See also: Capote and capoté

English[edit]

Traditional capote made with a Hudson's Bay point blanket.
Straw capote.
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Etymology[edit]

Borrowed from French capote.

Noun[edit]

capote (plural capotes)

  1. A long coat or cloak with a hood.
    • 1812, Lord Byron, Childe Harold’s Pilgrimage, London: John Murray, Canto 2, stanza 51, p. 86,[1]
      [] pensive o’er his scatter’d flock,
      The little shepherd in his white capote
      Doth lean his boyish form along the rock,
    • 1967, Joseph Singer and Elaine Gottlieb (translators), The Manor by Isaac Bashevis Singer, New York: Farrar, Straus and Giroux, Part 3, Chapter 26, p. 359,[2]
      It was said that the Rabbi of Kotsk had been in Favor of European dress, but the Rabbi of Gur and his followers had insisted on the Russian capote, trousers tucked into the boots, a kerchief around the neck, and the Russian cap adapted to the native style.
  2. (historical) A coat made from a blanket, worn by 19th-century Canadian woodsmen.
    • 1888, Theodore Roosevelt, Frontier Types, The Century Illustrated Monthly Magazine, October 1888.
      The fourth member of our party round the camp-fire that night was a powerfully built trapper, partly French by blood,who wore a gayly colored capote, or blanket-coat, a greasy fur cap, and moccasins.
  3. (historical) A close-fitting woman's bonnet.
    • 1908, Arnold Bennett, The Old Wives’ Tale, Garden City, NY: Doubleday, Book 3, Chapter 2, page 308,[3]
      Tied round her head with a large bow and flying blue ribbons under the chin, was a fragile flat capote like a baby’s bonnet, which allowed her hair to escape in front and her great chignon behind.

Derived terms[edit]

Anagrams[edit]


French[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Ultimately from Latin caput (head), with the diminutive French suffix -ote.

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /ka.pɔt/
  • (file)

Noun[edit]

capote f (plural capotes)

  1. greatcoat
  2. (of a car) soft top
  3. (slang) Ellipsis of capote anglaise (condom)
    • 1994, “Zig Zag de l'aisé”, in Obsolète, performed by MC Solaar:
      Le pape demande de choisir hostie ou capote / Oh Shit ! Moins de fidèles et plus de sex shops
      (please add an English translation of this quote)

Derived terms[edit]

Verb[edit]

capote

  1. first-person singular present indicative of capoter
  2. third-person singular present indicative of capoter
  3. first-person singular present subjunctive of capoter
  4. third-person singular present subjunctive of capoter
  5. second-person singular imperative of capoter

See also[edit]

Further reading[edit]

Anagrams[edit]


Italian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

capo- +‎

Noun[edit]

capote f (invariable)

  1. bonnet (British), hood (US) (of a car)
  2. soft top

Norman[edit]

Etymology[edit]

(This etymology is missing or incomplete. Please add to it, or discuss it at the Etymology scriptorium.)

Noun[edit]

capote f (plural capotes)

  1. condom

Portuguese[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Borrowed from French capote.

Noun[edit]

capote m (plural capotes)

  1. cloak
  2. (figuratively) disguise
  3. (slang) condom

Verb[edit]

capote

  1. first-person singular (eu) present subjunctive of capotar
  2. third-person singular (ele and ela, also used with você and others) present subjunctive of capotar
  3. third-person singular (você) affirmative imperative of capotar
  4. third-person singular (você) negative imperative of capotar

Spanish[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Borrowed from French capot. Doublet of capó.

Noun[edit]

capote m (plural capotes)

  1. cloak
  2. (bullfighting) cape worn by bullfighters

Derived terms[edit]