bull

Definition from Wiktionary, the free dictionary
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See also: Bull and Bull.

English[edit]

English Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /ˈbʊl/
  • (file)
  • Rhymes: -ʊl

Etymology 1[edit]

From Middle English bole, bul, bule, from a conflation of Old English bula (bull, steer) and Old Norse boli, both from Proto-Germanic *bulô (bull), from Proto-Indo-European *bʰl̥no-, from *bʰel- (to blow, swell up). Cognate with West Frisian bolle, Dutch bul, German Low German Bull, German Bulle, Swedish bulla; also Old Irish ball (limb), Latin follis (bellows, leather bag), Thracian βόλινθος (wild bull), Albanian buall (buffalo) or related bolle (testicles), Ancient Greek φαλλός (phallós, penis)).

Noun[edit]

A statue of a Spanish fighting bull or toro de lidia in Tordesillas, Valladolid, Spain

bull (countable and uncountable, plural bulls)

  1. An adult male of domesticated cattle or oxen.
    1. Specifically, one that is uncastrated.
  2. A male of domesticated cattle or oxen of any age.
  3. An adult male of certain large mammals, such as whales, elephants and seals.
  4. A large, strong man.
  5. (finance) An investor who buys (commodities or securities) in anticipation of a rise in prices.
  6. (slang) A policeman.
    1. (US) Specifically, a policeman employed in a railroad yard.
  7. (Britain, historical, obsolete slang) A crown coin; its value, 5 shillings.
  8. (Britain) Clipping of bullseye.
    1. (military, firearms) The central portion of a target, inside the inner and magpie.
  9. (Philadelphia, slang) A man.
  10. (uncountable, vulgar, slang) Clipping of bullshit..
  11. A man who has sex with another man's wife or girlfriend with the consent of both.
  12. (obsolete) A drink made by pouring water into a cask that previously held liquor.
Synonyms[edit]
Antonyms[edit]
  • (finance: investor who sells in anticipation of a fall in prices): bear
Coordinate terms[edit]
Derived terms[edit]
Translations[edit]
The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables, removing any numbers. Numbers do not necessarily match those in definitions. See instructions at Wiktionary:Entry layout#Translations.

Adjective[edit]

bull (not comparable)

  1. Large and strong, like a bull.
  2. (of large mammals) adult male
    a bull elephant
  3. (finance) Of a market in which prices are rising (compare bear)
  4. stupid
Synonyms[edit]
Antonyms[edit]
Translations[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

Shortened from bullshit

Verb[edit]

bull (third-person singular simple present bulls, present participle bulling, simple past and past participle bulled)

  1. (intransitive) To force oneself (in a particular direction).
    He bulled his way in.
  2. (intransitive) To lie, to tell untruths.
  3. (intransitive) To be in heat; to manifest sexual desire as cows do.
  4. (Britain, military) To polish boots to a high shine.
  5. (finance, transitive) To endeavour to raise the market price of.
    to bull railroad bonds
  6. (finance, transitive) To endeavour to raise prices in.
    to bull the market
Translations[edit]

Derived terms[edit]

Etymology 3[edit]

Middle English bulle, from Old French bulle, from Latin bulla, from Gaulish. Doublet of bull (bubble).

Noun[edit]

bull (plural bulls)

  1. A papal bull, an official document or edict from the Pope.
  2. A seal affixed to a document, especially a document from the Pope.
Translations[edit]

Verb[edit]

bull (third-person singular simple present bulls, present participle bulling, simple past and past participle bulled)

  1. (dated, 17th century) to publish in a Papal bull

Etymology 4[edit]

Middle English bull (falsehood), of unknown origin. Possibly related to Old French boul, boule, bole (fraud, deceit, trickery). Popularly associated with bullshit.

Noun[edit]

bull (uncountable)

  1. A lie.
  2. (euphemistic, informal) Nonsense.
Synonyms[edit]
Translations[edit]

Verb[edit]

bull (third-person singular simple present bulls, present participle bulling, simple past and past participle bulled)

  1. to mock, cheat

Etymology 5[edit]

Old French boule (ball), from Latin bulla (round swelling), of Gaulish origin. Doublet of bull (papal bull).

Noun[edit]

bull (plural bulls)

  1. (16th century, obsolete) a bubble

Catalan[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From bullir.

Noun[edit]

bull m (plural bulls)

  1. boiling
  2. effervescence

Verb[edit]

bull

  1. third-person singular present indicative form of bullir
  2. second-person singular imperative form of bullir

Etymology 2[edit]

Noun[edit]

bull m (plural bulls)

  1. a type of pork sausage

Further reading[edit]


French[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From bulldozer.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

bull m (plural bulls)

  1. (construction) bulldozer

Synonyms[edit]


Icelandic[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

bull n (genitive singular bulls, no plural)

  1. nonsense, gibberish

Declension[edit]

Synonyms[edit]

Related terms[edit]

  • bulla (to talk nonsense, to boil)

Westrobothnian[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Old Norse bolli, from Proto-Germanic *bullô.

Noun[edit]

bull m

  1. Wooden bowl, lathed vessel, big bowl.

Etymology 2[edit]

From Proto-Germanic *bullǭ.

Noun[edit]

bull f

  1. Loaf.
Derived terms[edit]