bos

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See also: Bos, , bõs, boš, boș, boş, bo's, Bos., and Boś

English[edit]

Noun[edit]

bos

  1. plural of bo

Anagrams[edit]


Afrikaans[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Dutch bos.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

bos (plural bosse, diminutive bossie)

  1. wood, forest
  2. bush, shrub
  3. bunch, bundle, sheaf, bouquet
    Hy het vir my 'n bossie blomme gegee
    He gave me a bunch/bouquet of flowers

Derived terms[edit]


Cornish[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Verb[edit]

bos

  1. to be

Conjugation[edit]



Mutation[edit]


Czech[edit]

Adverb[edit]

bos

  1. (literary) barefoot, barefooted

Synonyms[edit]

Related terms[edit]


Dalmatian[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

Possibly from Latin buxus (box tree).

Noun[edit]

bos m

  1. oak tree

Etymology 2[edit]

Unknown.

Noun[edit]

bos m

  1. thigh, hind quarters

Danish[edit]

Noun[edit]

bos n

  1. genitive singular indefinite of bo

Dutch[edit]

een bos (n, a forest)

Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Middle Dutch bosch, busch, from Old Dutch *busk, from Proto-Germanic *buskaz.

Noun[edit]

bos n (plural bossen, diminutive bosje n)

  1. wood, forest
    Zij ging wandelen in de bossen.
    She went walking in the woods.

bos m (plural bossen, diminutive bosje n)

  1. bouquet, cluster, bunch
    Hij bracht een bosje bloemen mee.
    He brought me a bouquet of flowers.

Derived terms[edit]


Friulian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin buxus, from Ancient Greek πύξος (púxos).

Noun[edit]

bos m (plural bos)

  1. box (tree)
  2. boxwood

Irish[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old Irish bas, bos (palm), from Proto-Celtic *bostā (palm, fist) (compare Breton boz (hollow of the hand)), from Proto-Indo-European *gʷosto-, *gʷosdʰo- (branch).

Noun[edit]

bos f (genitive singular boise, nominative plural bosa)

  1. (anatomy) palm of the hand
  2. (hurling) the flattened, curved end of a hurley

Declension[edit]

Synonyms[edit]

Mutation[edit]

Irish mutation
Radical Lenition Eclipsis
bos bhos mbos
Note: Some of these forms may be hypothetical. Not every
possible mutated form of every word actually occurs.

References[edit]

  • "bos" in Foclóir Gaeilge-Béarla, An Gúm, 1977, by Niall Ó Dónaill.
  • 1 bas” in Dictionary of the Irish Language, Royal Irish Academy, 1913–76.

Kristang[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Portuguese vós (ye), from Old Portuguese vos, from Latin vōs (ye).

Pronoun[edit]

bos

  1. you; thou (second-person singular personal pronoun)[1]

See also[edit]

Kristang personal pronouns (edit)
Person Singular Plural
First yo nus
Second bos bolotu
Third eli olotu

References[edit]

  1. ^ 2010, Ladislav Prištic, Kristang - Crioulo de Base Portuguesa, Masaryk University, page 26.

Ladino[edit]

Noun[edit]

bos f (Latin spelling, plural bozes)

  1. Alternative form of boz

Latin[edit]

Latin Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia la
bōs (a bull)

Etymology[edit]

Borrowed from Osco-Umbrian, most likely Sabellic (vs. expected Latin **ūs ~ **vōs), from Proto-Italic *gʷōs; ultimately from Proto-Indo-European *gʷṓws, which also gave Ancient Greek βοῦς (boûs), Sanskrit गो (go) (nominative singular gaús), and English cow.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

bōs m, f (genitive bovis); third declension

  1. a cow, bull, or ox
    • c. 98 CE, Tacitus, Germania 18
      Hoc iuncti boves, hoc paratus equus, hoc data arma denuntiant.
      The yoked oxen, the harnessed steed, the gift of arms, proclaim this fact.

Inflection[edit]

Third declension, irregular.

Case Singular Plural
nominative bōs bovēs
genitive bovis boum
dative bovī bōbus
būbus
accusative bovem bovēs
ablative bove bōbus
būbus
vocative bōs bovēs

Synonyms[edit]

Hypernyms[edit]

  • iumenta (when used to pull carts); armenta (when used to pull plows)

Hyponyms[edit]

Derived terms[edit]

Related terms[edit]

Descendants[edit]

See also[edit]

Taxonomy: Bos taurus (domestic cow) on Wikipedia

References[edit]

  • bos in Charlton T. Lewis and Charles Short (1879) A Latin Dictionary, Oxford: Clarendon Press
  • bos in Charlton T. Lewis (1891) An Elementary Latin Dictionary, New York: Harper & Brothers
  • du Cange, Charles (1883), “bos”, in G. A. Louis Henschel, Pierre Carpentier, Léopold Favre, editors, Glossarium Mediæ et Infimæ Latinitatis (in Latin), Niort: L. Favre
  • bos” in Félix Gaffiot’s Dictionnaire Illustré Latin-Français, Hachette (1934)

Serbo-Croatian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Slavic *bosъ.

Pronunciation[edit]

Adjective[edit]

bȏs (definite bȏsī, Cyrillic spelling бо̑с)

  1. barefoot

Declension[edit]


Slovene[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Adjective[edit]

bós or bòs (not comparable)

  1. barefoot

Declension[edit]


Swedish[edit]

Noun[edit]

bos

  1. indefinite genitive singular of bo

Verb[edit]

bos

  1. infinitive passive of bo.
  2. present tense passive of bo.

Synonyms[edit]


Tok Pisin[edit]

Etymology[edit]

English boss

Noun[edit]

bos

  1. boss; overseer; master
    • 1989, Buk Baibel long Tok Pisin, Bible Society of Papua New Guinea, Genesis 1:26 (translation here):
      Bihain God i tok olsem, “Nau yumi wokim ol manmeri bai ol i kamap olsem yumi yet. Bai yumi putim ol i stap bos bilong ol pis na ol pisin na bilong olgeta kain animal na bilong olgeta samting bilong graun.”

Synonyms[edit]

Related terms[edit]

This entry has fewer than three known examples of actual usage, the minimum considered necessary for clear attestation, and may not be reliable. Tok Pisin is subject to a special exemption for languages with limited documentation. If you speak it, please consider editing this entry or adding citations. See also Help and the Community Portal.

Volapük[edit]

Pronoun[edit]

bos

  1. something

Declension[edit]