sob

Definition from Wiktionary, the free dictionary
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See also: SOB

English[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Middle English sobben, perhaps from Middle Low German sabben (to drool, slobber, salivate). Cognate with West Frisian sabje, sobje (to suck), Dutch zabben, sabbelen (to suck), zabberen (to drool), German Low German sabbeln, severn (to drool), German sabbern (to drool, slobber), Norwegian sabbe (to spill, drop, make a mess). Compare also Old English sēofian (to lament), German saufen (to drink, swig).

Noun[edit]

sob (plural sobs)

  1. A cry with a short, sudden expulsion of breath.
  2. (onomatopoeia) sound of sob
    • 1874, George Carter Stent, The Jade Chaplet in Twenty-four Beads:
      “My husband, alas! whom I now (sob, sob) mourn,
      A short time since (sob) to this grave (sob) was borne;
      And (sob) he lies buried in this (sob, sob) grave.”
Derived terms[edit]
Translations[edit]

Verb[edit]

sob (third-person singular simple present sobs, present participle sobbing, simple past and past participle sobbed)

  1. (intransitive) To weep with convulsive gasps.
    • 1697, “Pastoral 5”, in Virgil; John Dryden, transl., The Works of Virgil: Containing His Pastorals, Georgics, and Æneis. [], London: [] Jacob Tonson, [], OCLC 403869432:
      She sigh'd, she sobb'd, and, furious with despair, / She rent her garments, and she tore her hair.
  2. (transitive) To say (something) while sobbing.
    "He doesn't love me!" she sobbed.
Synonyms[edit]
Translations[edit]


The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables, removing any numbers. Numbers do not necessarily match those in definitions. See instructions at Wiktionary:Entry layout § Translations.

Etymology 2[edit]

See sop.

Verb[edit]

sob (third-person singular simple present sobs, present participle sobbing, simple past and past participle sobbed)

  1. To soak.
    • 1707, J[ohn] Mortimer, The Whole Art of Husbandry; or, The Way of Managing and Improving of Land. [], 2nd edition, London: [] J[ohn] H[umphreys] for H[enry] Mortlock [], and J[onathan] Robinson [], published 1708, OCLC 13320837:
      the Tree, being sobbed and wet, ſwells the Wood

Anagrams[edit]


Czech[edit]

sob

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

sob m

  1. reindeer (an Arctic and Subarctic-dwelling deer)

Declension[edit]

Further reading[edit]

  • sob in Příruční slovník jazyka českého, 1935–1957
  • sob in Slovník spisovného jazyka českého, 1960–1971, 1989

Esperanto[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): [sob]
  • Hyphenation: sob

Adverb[edit]

sob

  1. (nonstandard) down, downwards (direction to the center of the Earth)

Synonyms[edit]

Antonyms[edit]

  • supren (up, upwards)
  • (neologism, nonstandard) sor (up, upwards)

Portuguese[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old Portuguese sob, so, su, from Latin sub, from Proto-Italic *supo, from Proto-Indo-European *upo (under, below).

Pronunciation[edit]

Preposition[edit]

sob

  1. under

Antonyms[edit]


Serbo-Croatian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Borrowed from Czech sob

Noun[edit]

sob m (Cyrillic spelling соб)

  1. reindeer

See also[edit]


Tzotzil[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

sob

  1. early morning

Adjective[edit]

sob

  1. of early morning

References[edit]


Volapük[edit]

Noun[edit]

sob (nominative plural sobs)

  1. soap

Declension[edit]