sop

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See also: SOP and söp

English[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Middle English sop, soppe, sope, from Old English sopa (sopped bread), from Proto-Germanic *supô (compare Dutch sop, Old High German sopfa), deverbative of *sūpaną (to sup). More at sup; compare soup.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

sop (plural sops)

  1. Something entirely soaked.
  2. A piece of solid food to be soaked in liquid food.
  3. Something given or done to pacify or bribe.
    • 1692, Roger L’Estrange, “ (please specify the fable number.) (please specify the name of the fable.)”, in Fables, of Æsop and Other Eminent Mythologists: [], London: [] R[ichard] Sare, [], OCLC 228727523:
      All Nature is [] cur;d with a sop.
    • 1996, Bernard Knox, Introduction to Robert Fagles's translation of The Odyssey:
      The suggested petrification of the ship is a sop to gratify Poseidon and compensate him for a concession--the Phaeacians will not be cut off from the sea.
    • 2020, Robert Kagan, “China’s dangerous Taiwan temptation”, in Washington Post[1]:
      That agreement, with its lofty promises of “one country, two systems,” was a fig leaf, as most knew at the time — a sop to Western consciences guilty for condemning the people of Hong Kong to their ultimate fate as wards of Beijing. What is happening today is exactly what was predicted and exactly what Chinese leaders intended. Our outrage, while appropriate, is also embarrassing.
  4. A weak, easily frightened or ineffectual person; a milksop
  5. (Appalachia) Gravy.
  6. (obsolete) A thing of little or no value.
  7. A piece of turf placed in the road as a target for a throw in road bowling.

Derived terms[edit]

Translations[edit]

Verb[edit]

sop (third-person singular simple present sops, present participle sopping, simple past and past participle sopped)

  1. (transitive) To steep or dip in any liquid.
    • 1928, Newman Ivey White, American Negro Folk-Songs, Cambridge: Harvard University Press, page 227:
      When I die, don't bury me deep, / Put a jug of 'lasses at my feet, / And a piece of corn bread in my hand, / Gwine to sop my way to the promised land.
    • 1945 December 27, Emily Post, “Sopping Bread May Be Done”, in The Spokesman-Review[2]:
      So again let me say that sopping bread into gravy can be done properly merely by putting a piece down on the gravy and then soaking it with the help of a knife and fork as though it were any other food. But taking a soft piece of bread and pushing it under the sauce with your fingers, submerging them as well as the bread, or even wiping the plate with it would be very bad manners indeed.
  2. (intransitive) To soak in, or be soaked; to percolate.

Derived terms[edit]

Translations[edit]

Anagrams[edit]


Dutch[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Middle Dutch sop (soup), from Old Dutch *sop, from Proto-Germanic *suppą. In the sense “water with soap” it is a shortening of zeepsop.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

sop n (plural soppen, diminutive sopje n)

  1. water with soap, usually for washing
  2. the sea in terms of somebody who will sail on it
    Het ruime sop kiezen.
    To set sail.
  3. (now dialectal) Archaic form of soep.

Derived terms[edit]

Descendants[edit]

  • Afrikaans: sop

Indonesian[edit]

Noun[edit]

sop (plural, first-person possessive sopku, second-person possessive sopmu, third-person possessive sopnya)

  1. soup

Irish[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Middle Irish sop(p), from Latin stuppa (coarse flax, tow)

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

sop m (genitive singular soip, nominative plural soip)

  1. wisp, small bundle (of straw, etc.)
  2. straw bedding; (straw) bed

Declension[edit]

Derived terms[edit]

Verb[edit]

sop (present analytic sopann, future analytic sopfaidh, verbal noun sopadh, past participle soptha)

  1. (transitive) light with straw

Conjugation[edit]

Mutation[edit]

Irish mutation
Radical Lenition Eclipsis
sop shop
after an, tsop
not applicable
Note: Some of these forms may be hypothetical. Not every possible mutated form of every word actually occurs.

Further reading[edit]


Middle English[edit]

Noun[edit]

sop

  1. small amount of food

Tok Pisin[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From English soap.

Noun[edit]

sop

  1. cleaner

West Frisian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

(This etymology is missing or incomplete. Please add to it, or discuss it at the Etymology scriptorium.)

Noun[edit]

sop n (plural soppen, diminutive sopke)

  1. juice
  2. soup

Derived terms[edit]

Further reading[edit]

  • “sop”, in Wurdboek fan de Fryske taal[3] (in Dutch), 2011

West Uvean[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From English soap.

Noun[edit]

sop

  1. soap

References[edit]

  • Claire Moyse-Faurie, Borrowings from Romance languages in Oceanic languages, in Aspects of Language Contact (2008, →ISBN