shrub

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See also: Shrub

English[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

  • (UK, US) enPR: shrŭb, IPA(key): /ʃɹʌb/
  • (file)
  • Rhymes: -ʌb

Etymology 1[edit]

From Middle English schrub, schrob, (also unassibilated as scrub), from Old English *sċrob (in placenames) and sċrybb (a shrub; shrubbery; underbrush); akin to Norwegian skrubbe (the dwarf cornel tree).

Noun[edit]

English Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia

shrub (plural shrubs)

  1. A woody plant smaller than a tree, and usually with several stems from the same base.
  2. (Kenyan English) A word mispronounced by replacing some consonant sounds with others of a similar place of articulation due to interference from one's knowledge of an indigenous Kenyan language.
    • 2010, Norma Mendoza-Denton; Dana Osborne, “Two Languages, Two Identities?”, in Carmen Llamas; Dominic Watt, editors, Language and Identities, →ISBN, page 121:
      It is not only in face-to-face contexts that Kenyans police shrubbing; there are newspaper columns inviting readers to send in shrubs that they have witnessed, []
    • 2011 September 23, Yeye, “Fuck it!”, in Media Madness[1], archived from the original on 2011-09-24:
      One of the first people to go on air on X Fm, Raabia (It’s not a kuyu [Kikuyu] shrub for labia) is about to exit the station, she’s being replaced by Mao (their lispy producer) []
Synonyms[edit]
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Verb[edit]

Examples (mispronounce a word)
  • Pronouncing shrub as /sɹʌb/ instead of /ʃɹʌb/

shrub (third-person singular simple present shrubs, present participle shrubbing, simple past and past participle shrubbed)

  1. (obsolete) To lop; to prune.
    • 1573, Anthony Anderson, An Exposition of the Hymne commonly called Benedictus:
      The Papistes [] though they be woll shrubbed, and shred, yet they begin euen nowe before the springe, to budde.
  2. (transitive, Kenyan English) To mispronounce a word by replacing some consonant sounds with others of a similar place of articulation due to interference from one's knowledge of an indigenous Kenyan language.
    • 2010, Norma Mendoza-Denton; Dana Osborne, quoting Heidi Orcutt-Gachiri, “Two Languages, Two Identities?”, in Carmen Llamas; Dominic Watt, editors, Shrubbing and the evaluation of expertise in Kenyan English and Kiswahili: placing Kenyan indigenous languages at risk, 2008, page 7, quoted in Language and Identities, →ISBN, page 121:
      The people who benefit from making fun of shrubbing, therefore, are Kenyans who do not speak indigenous languages, because they are less likely to shrub than Kenyans who learned English as a second language in school and may have a heavier accent.
    • 2014, Michael Gathonjia Wairungu, “The notion of shrubbing vs. Mother tongue interference: a question of generation”, in "A Language of Many Hats": The Rise of Sheng and other Linguistic Styles among Urban Youth in Kenya, page 310:
      However, Mwandani and her brother had noted that their mother had shrubbed and pointed it out right away.
    • 2019 April 19, Alice Wairimu Nderitu, “Harro! I shrub because, really, I have no otherwise, do I?”, in The East African[2], retrieved 2021-11-05:
      It is still considered embarrassing if people in authority like teachers or newscasters “shrub.”
Derived terms[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

From Arabic شِرَاب(širāb, a drink, beverage), شَرِبَ(šariba, to drink), akin to syrup, sherbet

Noun[edit]

English Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia

shrub (countable and uncountable, plural shrubs)

  1. A liquor composed of vegetable acid, fruit juice (especially lemon), sugar, sometimes vinegar, and a small amount of spirit as a preservative. Modern shrub is usually non-alcoholic, but in earlier times it was often mixed with a substantial amount of spirit such as brandy or rum, thus making it a liqueur.
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